The Gut Microbiome Is Associated with Circulating Dietary Biomarkers of Fruit and Vegetable Intake in a Multiethnic Cohort

Author(s):  
Cara L. Frankenfeld ◽  
Meredith A.J. Hullar ◽  
Gertraud Maskarinec ◽  
Kristine R. Monroe ◽  
John A. Shepherd ◽  
...  
2013 ◽  
Vol 27 (S1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Song‐Yi Park ◽  
Nicholas J. Ollberding ◽  
Christy G. Woolcott ◽  
Lynne R. Wilkens ◽  
Brian E. Henderson ◽  
...  

2013 ◽  
Vol 28 (2) ◽  
pp. 71-79 ◽  
Author(s):  
Christy G. Woolcott ◽  
Rod K. Dishman ◽  
Robert W. Motl ◽  
Caroline Horwath Matthai ◽  
Claudio R. Nigg

2005 ◽  
Vol 8 (3) ◽  
pp. 309-314 ◽  
Author(s):  
Yuki Sato ◽  
Yoshitaka Tsubono ◽  
Naoki Nakaya ◽  
Keiko Ogawa ◽  
Kayoko Kurashima ◽  
...  

AbstractObjectiveAdequate fruit and vegetable intake has been suggested to protect against colorectal cancer. However, several recent prospective studies have reported no association. We therefore examined the association between fruit and vegetable intakes and the risk of colorectal cancer in a prospective cohort study in Japan.DesignBetween June and August 1990, 47 605 Japanese men and women completed a self-administered questionnaire, including a food-frequency questionnaire. We divided the subjects into quartiles based on their self-reported fruit and vegetable consumption. There were 165 colon cancer and 110 rectal cancer incidences identified during 7 years of follow-up, to the end of December 1997. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the relative risk (RR) of developing colorectal cancer according to the level of fruit and vegetable consumption, applying adjustments for potential confounders.ResultsNo statistically significant association was observed between fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of colorectal cancer. The multivariate RR of colon cancer in the highest quartile of fruit and vegetable intake compared with the lowest was 1.13 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73–1.75), the RR for vegetables alone was 1.24 (95% CI 0.79–1.95) and that for fruit alone was 1.45 (95% CI 0.85–2.47). The corresponding multivariate RRs for rectal cancer were 1.12 (95% CI 0.67–1.89), 1.14 (95% CI 0.67–1.93) and 1.41 (95% CI 0.73–2.73).ConclusionsWe found no association between the consumption of fruit and vegetables and the risk of colorectal cancer among the Japanese population.


2004 ◽  
Vol 92 (6) ◽  
pp. 963-972 ◽  
Author(s):  
Luc Dauchet ◽  
Jean Ferrières ◽  
Dominique Arveiler ◽  
John W. Yarnell ◽  
Fred Gey ◽  
...  

Fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with low CHD risk in the USA and Northern Europe. There is, in contrast, little information about these associations in other regions of Europe. The goal of the present study was to assess the relationship between frequency of fruit and vegetable intake and CHD risk in two European populations with contrasting cardiovascular incidence rates; France and Northern Ireland. The present prospective study was in men aged 50–59 years, free of CHD, who were recruited in France (n 5982) and Northern Ireland (n 2105). Fruit and vegetable intake was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire. Incident cases of acute coronary events and angina were recorded over a 5-year follow-up. During follow-up there was a total of 249 ischaemic events. After adjustment on education level, smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption, employment status, BMI, blood pressure, serum total and HDL-cholesterol, the relative risks (RR) of acute coronary events were 0·67 (95% CI 0·44, 1·03) and 0·64 (95% CI 0·41, 0·99) in the 2nd and 3rd tertiles of citrus fruit consumption, respectively (P for trend <0·03). Similar results were observed in France and Northern Ireland. In contrast, the RR of acute coronary events for ‘other fruit’ consumption were 0·70 (95% CI 0·31, 1·56) and 0·52 (95% CI 0·24, 1·14) respectively in Northern Ireland (trend P<0·05) and 1·29 (95% CI 0·69, 2·4) and 1·15 (95% CI 0·68, 1·94) in France (trend P=0·5; interaction P<0·04). There was no evidence for any association between vegetable intake and total CHD events. In conclusion, frequency of citrus fruit, but not other fruits, intake is associated with lower rates of acute coronary events in both France and Northern Ireland, suggesting that geographical or related factors might affect the relationship between fruit consumption and CHD risk.


1999 ◽  
Vol 31 (3) ◽  
pp. 153-160 ◽  
Author(s):  
Elisabeth Schafer ◽  
Robert B. Schafer ◽  
Patricia M. Keith ◽  
Jana Böse

2005 ◽  
Vol 92 (11) ◽  
pp. 2059-2064 ◽  
Author(s):  
M H Tao ◽  
W H Xu ◽  
W Zheng ◽  
Y T Gao ◽  
Z X Ruan ◽  
...  

1997 ◽  
Vol 51 (9) ◽  
pp. 601-606 ◽  
Author(s):  
I Hininger ◽  
M Chopra ◽  
DI Thurnham ◽  
F Laporte ◽  
M-J Richard ◽  
...  

2012 ◽  
Vol 25 (2) ◽  
pp. 180-189 ◽  
Author(s):  
L. Wang ◽  
J. E. Manson ◽  
J. M. Gaziano ◽  
J. E. Buring ◽  
H. D. Sesso

Obesity ◽  
2017 ◽  
Vol 25 (8) ◽  
pp. 1321-1328 ◽  
Author(s):  
Maria Bernales-Korins ◽  
Ian Yi Han Ang ◽  
Shamima Khan ◽  
Allan Geliebter

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