RCTs of complex interventions in mental health care: what works for whom?

2011 ◽  
Vol 38 (S 01) ◽  
Author(s):  
B Puschner ◽  
M Slade
2020 ◽  
Vol 11 ◽  
pp. 215013272090417
Author(s):  
Donald E Nease ◽  
Matthew J. Simpson ◽  
Linda Zittleman ◽  
Jodi Summers Holtrop ◽  
Tristen L. Hall ◽  
...  

Background: The evidence underlying clinical guidelines arising from typical scientific inquiry may not always match the needs and concerns of local communities. Our High Plains Research Network Community Advisory Council (HPRN CAC) identified a need for evidence regarding how to assist members of their community suffering from mental health issues to recognize their need for help and then obtain access to mental health care. The lack of evidence led our academic team to pursue linking Appreciative Inquiry with Boot Camp Translation (AI/BCT). This article describes the development and testing of this linked method. Method: We worked with the HPRN CAC and other communities affiliated with the State Networks of Colorado Ambulatory Practices and Partners (SNOCAP) practice-based research networks to identify 5 topics for testing of AI/BCT. For each topic, we developed AI interview recruitment strategies and guides with our community partners, conducted interviews, and analyzed the interview data. Resulting themes for each topic were then utilized by 5 groups with the BCT method to develop community relevant messages and materials to communicate the evidence generated in each AI set of interviews. At each stage for each topic, notes on adaptations, barriers, and successes were recorded by the project team. Results: Each topic successfully led to generation of community specific evidence, messages, and materials for dissemination using the AI/BCT method. Beyond this, 5 important lessons emerged regarding the AI/BCT method: Researchers must (1) first ensure whether the topic is a good fit for AI, (2) maintain a focus on “what works” throughout all stages, (3) recruit one or more experienced qualitative analysts, (4) ensure adequate time and resources for the extensive AI/BCT process, and (5) present AI findings to BCT participants in the context of existing evidence and the local community and allow time for community partners to ask questions and request additional data analyses to be done. Conclusions: AI/BCT represents an effective way of responding to a community’s need for evidence around a specific topic where standard evidence and/or guidelines do not exist. AI/BCT is a method for turning the “random” successes of individuals into “usual” practice at a community level.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Nicola Cogan ◽  
Heather Archbold ◽  
Karen Deakin ◽  
Bethany Griffith ◽  
Isabel Sáez Berruga ◽  
...  

Efforts have been made to adapt the delivery of mental health care and support services to the demands of COVID-19. Here we detail the perspectives and experiences of mental health workers (MHWs), in relation to what they found helpful when adapting mental health services during the COVID-19 pandemic and responding to its demands. We were interested in exploring what has helped to support MHWs’ own health and wellbeing given that staff wellbeing is central to sustaining the delivery of quality mental health services moving forward. Individual interviews were conducted with MHWs (n = 30) during the third COVID-19 lockdown. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and managed using NVIVO. Qualitative data was analyzed using an inductive thematic approach. Three major themes were created, which emphasized the importance of: (1) 'self-care and peer support (checking in with each other)', (2) 'team cohesion and collaboration' and (3) 'visible and supportive management and leadership (new ways of working)'. Our findings emphasize the importance of individual, team and systems-based support in helping MHWs maintain their own wellbeing, whilst adapting and responding to the challenges in providing mental health care and support during this pandemic. Guidance and direction from management, with adaptive leadership in providing sustained, efficient, and equitable delivery of mental healthcare, is essential. Our findings support future policy, research and mental health practice developments through sharing important salutogenic lessons learned and transferable insights which may help with preparedness for future pandemics.


BJPsych Open ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 7 (S1) ◽  
pp. S102-S102
Author(s):  
Sheena Shah ◽  
Arshad Hussain ◽  
Sabreena Qadri ◽  
Fazle Roub ◽  
Insha Rauf ◽  
...  

AimsWhile other mental health care outpatient facilities were moved to COVID-centers in March 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences in Kashmir remained the only functional outpatient facility in the region. It is the only mental health care hospital in the country with a residential facility for psychiatric inpatients catering to the whole population of Jammu and Kashmir, India. The Mental Health Care Act 2017 that neccesitated “halfway homes” is yet to be implemented in the state leaving it's inpatients entirely under the institution's care. This study is to investigate the seroprevalence of antibodies to SARS-COVID-19 virus in the 34 residential inpatients in separate male (23 patients) and female (11 patients) wards. This was done as an audit to strategies and measures taken by the institute in protecting it's inpatients.Method3 to 5 ml of peripheral venous blood samples were collected and plasma extracted and analysed using the CE-IVD Roche Cobas Elecsys AntiSARS-CoV-2, Electrochemiluminescence Immunoassay (ECLIA) for the qualitative detection of total Immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM and IgA; Pan Ig) generated against SARS-CoV-2 (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN, USA). The test was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions.ResultOut of the 34 inpatients, 2 male inpatients tested positive for antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 (seroprevalence of 5.88%). In comparison, based on a report conducted by the government's Department of Community Medicine and Biochemistry on the 28th of October 2020, out of 2,361 participants in the community, 959 tested positive (seroprevalence of 40.6%).One of the inpatients that tested positive was re-admitted after testing negative via RT-PCR. The second patient was admitted after being found homeless. He was tested negative on day 1 via RAT and on day 5 via RT-PCR. We believe both of them aquired the infection in the community.ConclusionThis audit shows that the strategies implemented by the institute were effective in the prevention of the spread of COVID-19. Practical implementations of what works and improvisations are the proven methods of decreasing the mortality and morbidity in vulnerable populations while continuously providing vital mental health services.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Michael C Mullarkey ◽  
Jessica L. Schleider

Clinical psychological scientists have spent decades attempting to understand “what works for whom” in the context of youth psychotherapy, toward the longstanding goal of personalizing psychosocial interventions to fit individual needs and characteristics. However, as the articles in this Special Issue jointly underscore, more than 50 years of psychotherapy research has yet to help us realize this goal. In this introduction to the special issue, we outline how and why “aspiration-method mismatches” have hampered progress toward identifying moderators of youth psychotherapy; emphasize the need to embrace etiological complexity and scientific humility in pursuing new methodological solutions; and propose individual and structural strategies for better-aligning clinical research methods with the goal of personalizing mental health care for youth with diverse identities and treatment needs.


2011 ◽  
Vol 38 (S 01) ◽  
Author(s):  
A Bramesfeld ◽  
K Kopke ◽  
M Walle ◽  
J Radisch ◽  
D Büchtemann ◽  
...  

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