Factors associated with emotional response of parents at the time of diagnosis of Down syndrome

2011 ◽  
Vol 16 (2) ◽  
pp. 113-120 ◽  
Author(s):  
Eun Kyoung Choi ◽  
Yong Ju Lee ◽  
Il Young Yoo
CRANIO® ◽  
2018 ◽  
Vol 38 (6) ◽  
pp. 365-369 ◽  
Author(s):  
Natália Cristina Ruy Carneiro ◽  
Isabela de Castro Souza ◽  
Tahyná Duda Deps Almeida ◽  
Júnia Maria Cheib Serra-Negra ◽  
Isabela Almeida Pordeus ◽  
...  

2008 ◽  
Vol 133 (4) ◽  
pp. 489.e1-489.e8 ◽  
Author(s):  
Ana Cristina Borges Oliveira ◽  
Saul Martins Paiva ◽  
Mônica Rodrigues Campos ◽  
Dina Czeresnia

2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Michelle Gates ◽  
Jennifer Pillay ◽  
Aireen Wingert ◽  
Samantha Guitard ◽  
Sholeh Rahman ◽  
...  

Background: To inform vaccine prioritization guidance by the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI), we reviewed evidence on the magnitude of association between risk factors and severe outcomes of COVID-19. Methods: We updated our existing review by searching online databases and websites for cohort studies providing multivariate adjusted associations. One author screened studies and extracted data. Two authors estimated the magnitude of association between exposures and outcomes as little-to-no (odds, risk, or hazard ratio <2.0, or >0.50 for reduction), large (2.0-3.9, or 0.50-0.26 for reduction), or very large (>=4.0, or <=0.25 for reduction), and rated the evidence certainty using GRADE. Results: Of 7,819 unique records we included 111 reports. There is probably (moderate certainty) at least a large increase in mortality from COVID-19 among people aged 60-69 vs. <60 years (11 studies, n=517,217), with 2+ vs. no comorbidities (4 studies, n=189,608), and for people with (vs. without): Down syndrome (1 study, n>8 million), type 1 and 2 diabetes (1 study, n>8 million), end-stage kidney disease (1 study, n>8 million), epilepsy (1 study, n>8 million), motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, or Huntingtons disease (as a grouping; 1 study, n>8 million). The magnitude of association with mortality is probably very large for Down syndrome and may (low certainty) be very large for age 60-69 years, and diabetes. There is probably little-to-no increase in severe outcomes with several cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, and for adult males vs. females. Interpretation: Future research should focus on risk factors where evidence is low quality (e.g., social factors) or non-existent (e.g., rare conditions), the pediatric population, combinations of comorbidities that may increase risk, and long-term outcomes. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO #CRD42021230185.


2012 ◽  
Vol 52 (4) ◽  
pp. 194
Author(s):  
Frieda Handayani Kawanto ◽  
Soedjatmiko Soedjatmiko ◽  
Aryono Hendarto

Introduction Despite the considerable number of children withDo\Vll syndrome in Indonesia, there is little data available on thesuccess of intervention programs. This study was performed todefine factors affecting the intelligence of young children withDo\Vll syndrome.Objective To determine factors associated Mth lower intelligencein children with Down syndrome, including growth parametersand participation in intervention programs.Methods This cross􀁃sectional study was undertaken fromDecember 2010 to March 2011. Subjects were 60 childrenwith Down syndrome aged 2􀁃6 years who were enrolled inan intervention program at both the Medical RehabilitationDepartment, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, and the Growthand Development Clinic, Harapan Kita Women's and Children'sHospital. Parents' data was obtained through self history􀁃takingand perusal of medical records. Subjects' anthropometricdata (body weight, body height, and head circumference) wasobtained through measurements using calibrated instruments.A psychologist administered IQ tests on the subjects. Results ofthe anthropometric and IQ tests were given to parents one weekfollowing the examinations.Results From the 111 children with Down syndromeregistered in the intervention programs, 60 children (36boys and 24 girls) met the inclusion criteria. The mean ageof subjects was 4 years 6 months. Most subjects were well􀁃nourished. Fifty􀁃five subjects had microcephaly. Eighty􀁃twopercent of subjects participated in the program regularly and70% of subjects had started in the program at less than 1 yearof age. Subjects' mean IQ was 52.8. Analysis showed thatgirls, subjects who were overweight and obese, subjects withmicrocephaly, those with irregular attendance in the program,and those living under the poverty line were at highest riskfor severe mental retardation.Conclusion Factors associated v.ith the intelligence in childrenwith Down syndrome were female gender, overweight/obesity, severe microcephaly, below􀁃poverty line economic status, andirregular participation in the program. [Paediatr Indones.2012;52:194-9].


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Poornima R. Wijayaratne ◽  
Katrina Williams ◽  
Margot J. Davey ◽  
Rosemary S.C. Horne ◽  
Gillian M. Nixon

2012 ◽  
Vol 52 ◽  
pp. 194-199
Author(s):  
Frieda Handayani Kawanto ◽  
Soedjatmiko Soedjatmiko ◽  
Aryono Hendarto

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