Prevalence of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O157 and Non-O157 Serogroups Isolated from Fresh Raw Beef Meat Samples in an Industrial Slaughterhouse

2021 ◽  
Vol 2021 ◽  
pp. 1-6
Author(s):  
Kiandokht Babolhavaeji ◽  
Leili Shokoohizadeh ◽  
Morteza Yavari ◽  
Abbas Moradi ◽  
Mohammad Yousef Alikhani

Background. The aims of the current study are the identification of O157 and non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups isolated from fresh raw beef meat samples in an industrial slaughterhouse, determination of antimicrobial resistance patterns, and genetic linkage of STEC isolates. Materials and Methods. A total of 110 beef samples were collected from the depth of the rump of cattle slaughtered at Hamadan industrial slaughterhouse. After detection of E. coli isolates, STEC strains were identified according to PCR for stx1, stx2, eaeA, and hlyA virulence genes, and STEC serogroups (O157 and non-O157) were identified by PCR. The genetic linkage of STEC isolates was analyzed by the ERIC- (Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus-) PCR method. The antimicrobial susceptibility of STEC isolates was detected by the disk diffusion method according to CLSI guidelines. Results. Among 110 collected beef samples, 77 (70%) were positive for E. coli. The prevalence of STEC in E. coli isolates was 8 (10.4%). The overall prevalence of O157 and non-O157 STEC isolates was 12.5% (one isolate) and 87.5% (7 isolates), respectively. The hemolysin gene was detected in 25% (2 isolates) of STEC strains. Evaluation of antibiotic resistance indicated that 100% of STEC isolates were resistant to ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, and cefazolin. Resistance to tetracycline and ciprofloxacin was detected in 62.5% and 12.5% of isolates, respectively. The analysis of the ERIC-PCR results showed five different ERIC types among the STEC isolates. Conclusion. The isolation of different clones STECs from beef and the presence of antibiotic-resistant isolates indicate that more attention should be paid to the hygiene of slaughterhouses.

2008 ◽  
Vol 71 (10) ◽  
pp. 2082-2086 ◽  
Author(s):  
LUCIANO BENEDUCE ◽  
GIUSEPPE SPANO ◽  
ARI Q. NABI ◽  
FRANCESCO LAMACCHIA ◽  
SALVATORE MASSA ◽  
...  

In this study, 100 raw meat samples were collected from 15 local Moroccan butcheries in five different areas of the city of Rabat during a period of 4 months. Overall, 7 of 15 butcheries from three areas of the city yielded strains of Escherichia coli O157. Single isolates from 9 (9%) of 100 raw meat samples were biochemically and serologically confirmed as E. coli O157. Using molecular techniques, two strains were positive for the Shiga toxin, with two additional strains containing an attaching-effacing gene. All potentially virulent serotypes isolated from these meat samples showed distinct pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. Based on antibiotic susceptibility testing, more than 70% of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin and clavulanic acid–amoxicillin. Moreover, one strain was resistant to more than three antibiotics. Our study represents the first survey of E. coli O157 and related serotypes in raw meat products in Morocco.


Foods ◽  
2020 ◽  
Vol 9 (11) ◽  
pp. 1543 ◽  
Author(s):  
Issmat I. Kassem ◽  
Nivin A Nasser ◽  
Joanna Salibi

Meat is an important source of high biological value proteins as well as many vitamins and minerals. In Lebanon, beef meats, including raw minced beef, are among the most consumed of the meat products. However, minced beef meat can also be an important source of foodborne illnesses. This is of a major concern, because food safety in Lebanon suffers from well-documented challenges. Consequently, the prevalence and loads of fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli were quantified to assess the microbiological acceptability of minced beef meat in Lebanon. Additionally, antibiotic resistance phenotypes of the E. coli were determined in response to concerns about the emergence of resistance in food matrices in Lebanon. A total of 50 meat samples and 120 E. coli isolates were analyzed. Results showed that 98% and 76% of meat samples harbored fecal coliforms and E. coli above the microbial acceptance level, respectively. All E. coli were resistant to at least one antibiotic, while 35% of the isolates were multidrug-resistant (MDR). The results suggest that Lebanon needs to (1) update food safety systems to track and reduce the levels of potential contamination in important foods and (2) implement programs to control the proliferation of antimicrobial resistance in food systems.


2004 ◽  
Vol 67 (6) ◽  
pp. 1234-1237 ◽  
Author(s):  
N. BENKERROUM ◽  
Y. BOUHLAL ◽  
A. EL ATTAR ◽  
A. MARHABEN

Samples of meat and dairy products taken from the city of Rabat, Morocco, were examined for the presence of Escherichia coli O157 by the selective enrichment procedure followed by plating on cefixime–tellurite–sorbitol MacConkey agar and a latex agglutination test. The ability of isolates to produce Shiga toxins (ST1 or ST2) was also tested by an agglutination test using sensitized latex. Dairy samples (n = 44) included different products commonly consumed in the country. Meat samples (n = 36) were taken from traditional butchers because these products are generally marketed in this way. Random samples were taken from each product during the period of January through May. Of the 80 samples tested, 8 (10%) harbored E. coli O157. Four dairy and four meat samples were contaminated (9.1 and 11.1%, respectively). Of 10 E. coli O157 isolates from contaminated samples demonstrating true antigen-antibody agglutination, 5 (50%) produced either ST2 alone or ST2 plus ST1. Four of the five strains (80%) were meat isolates and produced ST2 with or without ST1, and the fifth was a dairy isolate producing ST2.


2021 ◽  
Vol 2021 ◽  
pp. 1-5
Author(s):  
Omid Zarei ◽  
Leili Shokoohizadeh ◽  
Hadi Hossainpour ◽  
Mohammad Yousef Alikhani

Background. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is known as a crucial zoonotic food-borne pathogen. A total of 257 raw chicken meat samples were collected from different markets in Hamadan, west of Iran, from January 2016 to May 2017. Materials and Methods. The samples were cultured in selective and differential culture media, and the virulence genes of E. coli isolates were analyzed by PCR assay. The antibiotic resistance patterns of E. coli isolates were determined by the disk diffusion method. The genetic relatedness of the E. coli O157 isolates was analyzed by ERIC-PCR. Results. In total, 93 (36% ± 3.12) of the isolates were identified as E. coli in this study. Based on serological and microbiological tests, 36 (38.7% ± 9.9), 7 (7.5% ± 5.35), and 12 (12.9% ± 6.81) of the E. coli isolates were characterized as STEC, enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and attaching and effacing E. coli (AEEC) strains, respectively. A high level of resistance to nalidixic acid (91.4% ± 5.7), tetracycline (89.2% ± 6.31), ampicillin (82.8% ± 7.67), and trimotoprime-sulfametoxazole (71% ± 9.22) was detected among the E. coli isolates. The analysis of the ERIC-PCR results showed five different ERIC types among the E. coli O157 isolates. Conclusions. Based on our findings, control and check-up of poultry meats should be considered as a crucial issue for public health.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Meshari Ahmed Alhadlaq ◽  
Mohammed I. Mujallad ◽  
Suliman M. I. Alajel

Abstract Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a foodborne pathogen, which causes various health conditions in humans, including fatigue, nausea, and bloody diarrhoea, and in some cases, even death. In 2017, 15.71% of the total imported food products in Saudi Arabia were meat-based. India and Brazil are two of the top five countries from where Saudi Arabia imports meat. According to the Saudi Food and Drug Authority, in 2017, at least 562, 280, and 50 samples of imported beef, chicken, and sheep meat, respectively, were tested for the presence of E. coli O157:H7. Amongst these, E. coli O157:H7 was detected in respectively 6.5% and 2.2% of the tested beef meat samples imported from India and Brazil as well as in respectively 6.96% and 3.57% of the tested chicken samples imported from Brazil and Ukraine. Moreover, the pathogen was detected in 2.1% of the tested sheep meat samples imported from India. The present report provides evidence that imported meat can serve as the carrier of E. coli O157:H7, leading to epidemics, within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.


2002 ◽  
Vol 68 (2) ◽  
pp. 576-581 ◽  
Author(s):  
Carl M. Schroeder ◽  
Cuiwei Zhao ◽  
Chitrita DebRoy ◽  
Jocelyn Torcolini ◽  
Shaohua Zhao ◽  
...  

ABSTRACT A total of 361 Escherichia coli O157 isolates, recovered from humans, cattle, swine, and food during the years 1985 to 2000, were examined to better understand the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among these organisms. Based on broth microdilution results, 220 (61%) of the isolates were susceptible to all 13 antimicrobials tested. Ninety-nine (27%) of the isolates, however, were resistant to tetracycline, 93 (26%) were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, 61 (17%) were resistant to cephalothin, and 48 (13%) were resistant to ampicillin. Highest frequencies of resistance occurred among swine isolates (n = 70), where 52 (74%) were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, 50 (71%) were resistant to tetracycline, 38 (54%) were resistant to cephalothin, and 17 (24%) were resistant to ampicillin. Based on the presence of Shiga toxin genes as determined by PCR, 210 (58%) of the isolates were identified as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Among these, resistance was generally low, yet 21 (10%) were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and 19 (9%) were resistant to tetracycline. Based on latex agglutination, 189 (52%) of the isolates were identified as E. coli O157:H7, among which 19 (10%) were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and 16 (8%) were resistant to tetracycline. The data suggest that selection pressure imposed by the use of tetracycline derivatives, sulfa drugs, cephalosporins, and penicillins, whether therapeutically in human and veterinary medicine or as prophylaxis in the animal production environment, is a key driving force in the selection of antimicrobial resistance in STEC and non-STEC O157.


2012 ◽  
Vol 49 (No. 9) ◽  
pp. 317-326 ◽  
Author(s):  
J. Osek

A total of 90 Escherichia coli O157 isolates recovered from humans, cattle, and pigs, were examined for the presence of the H7 antigen, ability to produce Shiga toxins and enterohemolysin as well as for antimicrobial resistance and biochemical properties. Fourteen of the human strains (n = 23) and 21 of the bovine isolates (n&nbsp;=&nbsp;29) were of the O157:H7 serotype as determined by agglutination and PCR methods. All E. coli O157 of porcine origin (n&nbsp;=&nbsp;38) were H-negative. Based on the ability to produce Shiga toxins (Stxs), all human and cattle isolates and 11&nbsp;strains recovered from swine were identified as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC). Among STEC, most human strains (18 isolates) were Stx1- and Stx2-positive whereas cattle strains were mostly Stx2-positive. Eleven porcine STEC produced either Stx1 (7 isolates) or Stx2 (4 strains) toxins; an additional 20 isolates recovered from these animals had the Stx2e toxin gene as previously determined by PCR. All human and cattle E. coli O157 produced enterohemolysin whereas only 4 strains recovered from pigs were ehly-positive. Moreover, the PCR identification of the lpf<sub>O113</sub> gene performed earlier revealed that this putative virulence marker was present in all porcine isolates, only in 5 strains of bovine origin but in none of E. coli O157 recovered from humans. All 90 E. coli O157 strains tested displayed 10&nbsp;biochemical profiles that were different at least in one of the reaction tested. The most common atypical reaction observed among porcine O157 isolates was ability to ferment sorbitol (all strains) and production of &beta;-glucuronidase (25 isolates). Moreover, none of the sorbitol-positive strains was able to produce indol. Four antimicrobial resistance profiles among 90 E. coli O157 strains tested were observed. Most of the isolates recovered from humans and all strains from cattle were resistant only to rifampicin whereas the porcine strains showed resistance to either 3 antimicrobials (4 isolates) or to 4 drugs tested (34 isolates). The phenotypic data shown in the present study, together with the previously published genotypic analyses of these strains, confirm earlier suggestions that the porcine E. coli O157 strains are mostly different from those of bovine and human O157 isolates and could therefore play less important role in human STEC O157 infections.


2019 ◽  
Author(s):  
Solomon Abreham ◽  
Akafete Teklu ◽  
Eric Cox ◽  
Tesfaye Sisay Tessema

Abstract Background: Cattle have been identified as a major reservoir of E. coli O157:H7 for human infection; the ecology of the organism in sheep and goats is less understood. This study was carried out to determine prevalence, source of infection, antibiotic resistance and molecular characterization of Escherichia coli O157: H7 isolated from sheep and goat. Methods: Systematic random sampling was carried out at Modjo export abattoir, Ethiopia, from November 2012 to April 2013 to collect 408 samples from 72 sheep and 32 goats. Samples collected were skin swabs, fecal samples, intestinal mucosal swabs and the inside and outside part of carcasses as well as carcass in contacts such as workers hands, knife, hook and carcass washing water. Then, samples were processed following standard bacteriological procedures. Non-Sorbitol fermenting colonies were tested on latex agglutination test and the positives are subjected to PCR for detection of attaching and effacing genes (eae) and shiga toxin producing genes (stx 1 and stx 2). All E. coli O157:H7 isolates were checked for their susceptibility pattern towards 15 selected antibiotics. Results: E. coli O157:H7 were detected in only 20/408 samples (4.9%). Among these 20 positive samples, 70% (14/20), 25% (5/20) and 5% (1/20) were from sheep, goats and knife samples, respectively. No significant associations were found between carcasses and the assumed sources of contaminations. Of all the 20 isolates virulent genes were found in 10 (50%) of them; 3 (15%) with only the eaeA gene and 7(35%) expressing eaeA and stx 2 genes. All the isolates were susceptible to Norfloxacin (NOR) (100%). Conclusions: The presence of virulent genes shows E. coli O157:H7 is a potential source of human infection in Ethiopia.


2019 ◽  
Author(s):  
Solomon Abreham ◽  
Akafete Teklu ◽  
Eric Cox ◽  
Tesfaye Sisay Tessema

Abstract Background: Cattle have been identified as a major reservoir of E. coli O157:H7 for human infection; the ecology of the organism in sheep and goats is less understood. This study was carried out to determine prevalence, source of infection, antibiotic resistance and molecular characterization of Escherichia coli O157: H7 isolated from sheep and goat. Methods: Systematic random sampling was carried out at Modjo export abattoir, Ethiopia, from November 2012 to April 2013 to collect 408 samples from 72 sheep and 32 goats. Samples collected were skin swabs, fecal samples, intestinal mucosal swabs and the inside and outside part of carcasses as well as carcass in contacts such as workers hands, knife, hook and carcass washing water. Then, samples were processed following standard bacteriological procedures. Non-Sorbitol fermenting colonies were tested on latex agglutination test and the positives are subjected to PCR for detection of attaching and effacing genes (eae) and shiga toxin producing genes (stx 1 and stx 2). All E. coli O157:H7 isolates were checked for their susceptibility pattern towards 15 selected antibiotics. Results: E. coli O157:H7 were detected in only 20/408 samples (4.9%). Among these 20 positive samples, 70% (14/20), 25% (5/20) and 5% (1/20) were from sheep, goats and knife samples, respectively. No significant associations were found between carcasses and the assumed sources of contaminations. Of all the 20 isolates virulent genes were found in 10 (50%) of them; 3 (15%) with only the eaeA gene and 7(35%) expressing eaeA and stx 2 genes. All the isolates were susceptible to Norfloxacin (NOR) (100%). Conclusions: The presence of virulent genes shows E. coli O157:H7 is a potential source of human infection in Ethiopia.


2000 ◽  
Vol 68 (3) ◽  
pp. 1400-1407 ◽  
Author(s):  
Phillip I. Tarr ◽  
Sima S. Bilge ◽  
James C. Vary ◽  
Srdjan Jelacic ◽  
Rebecca L. Habeeb ◽  
...  

ABSTRACT The mechanisms used by Shiga toxin (Stx)-producingEscherichia coli to adhere to epithelial cells are incompletely understood. Two cosmids from an E. coliO157:H7 DNA library contain an adherence-conferring chromosomal gene encoding a protein similar to iron-regulated gene A (IrgA) ofVibrio cholerae (M. B. Goldberg, S. A. Boyko, J. R. Butterton, J. A. Stoebner, S. M. Payne, and S. B. Calderwood, Mol. Microbiol. 6:2407–2418, 1992). We have termed the product of this gene the IrgA homologue adhesin (Iha), which is encoded by iha. Iha is 67 kDa in E. coliO157:H7 and 78 kDa in laboratory E. coli and is structurally unlike other known adhesins. DNA adjacent toiha contains tellurite resistance loci and is conserved in structure in distantly related pathogenic E. coli, but it is absent from nontoxigenic E. coli O55:H7, sorbitol-fermenting Stx-producing E. coli O157:H−, and laboratory E. coli. We have termed this region the tellurite resistance- and adherence-conferring island. We conclude that Iha is a novel bacterial adherence-conferring protein and is contained within an E. coli chromosomal island of conserved structure. Pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 has only recently acquired this island.


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