The Prevalence of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli and Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolated from Raw Chicken Meat Samples

2021 ◽  
Vol 2021 ◽  
pp. 1-5
Author(s):  
Omid Zarei ◽  
Leili Shokoohizadeh ◽  
Hadi Hossainpour ◽  
Mohammad Yousef Alikhani

Background. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is known as a crucial zoonotic food-borne pathogen. A total of 257 raw chicken meat samples were collected from different markets in Hamadan, west of Iran, from January 2016 to May 2017. Materials and Methods. The samples were cultured in selective and differential culture media, and the virulence genes of E. coli isolates were analyzed by PCR assay. The antibiotic resistance patterns of E. coli isolates were determined by the disk diffusion method. The genetic relatedness of the E. coli O157 isolates was analyzed by ERIC-PCR. Results. In total, 93 (36% ± 3.12) of the isolates were identified as E. coli in this study. Based on serological and microbiological tests, 36 (38.7% ± 9.9), 7 (7.5% ± 5.35), and 12 (12.9% ± 6.81) of the E. coli isolates were characterized as STEC, enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and attaching and effacing E. coli (AEEC) strains, respectively. A high level of resistance to nalidixic acid (91.4% ± 5.7), tetracycline (89.2% ± 6.31), ampicillin (82.8% ± 7.67), and trimotoprime-sulfametoxazole (71% ± 9.22) was detected among the E. coli isolates. The analysis of the ERIC-PCR results showed five different ERIC types among the E. coli O157 isolates. Conclusions. Based on our findings, control and check-up of poultry meats should be considered as a crucial issue for public health.

2019 ◽  
Author(s):  
omid zarei ◽  
Leili Shokoohizadeh ◽  
Hadi Hossainpour ◽  
Mohammad Yousef Alikhani

Abstract Objective: Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) has known as a crucial zoonotic food borne pathogen. A total of 257 row chicken meat samples were collected from different markets in Hamadan city from January 2016 to May 2017. Samples were cultured on selective and differential culture media, and the virulence genes of E. coli isolates were analyzed by PCR assay. The antibiotic resistance patterns of E. coli isolates were determined by disk diffusion method. The genetic relatedness of STEC isolates were analyzed by ERIC-PCR. Results: Totally, 93(36%) of isolates were identified as E. coli in this current study. According serological and microbiological tests, 5(5.3%), 31(33.3%) and 7(7.5%) of E. coli isolates, characterized as Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), STEC and attaching and effacing E. coli (AEEC) strains, respectively. High level resistance to tetracycline (89.8), ampicillin (82.8%) and sulfametoxazole-trimotoprime (71%) were detected among E. coli isolates. Analysis of ERIC-PCR results showed five different ERIC types among EHEC isolates. Based on our findings, chicken meat identified as a sources of STEC strains, therefore, the controlling and checkup the chicken meats for the resistance and virulent strains of E. coli should be consider as a crucial issues in public health.


2019 ◽  
Author(s):  
omid zarei ◽  
Leili Shokoohizadeh ◽  
Hadi Hossainpour ◽  
Mohammad Yousef Alikhani

Abstract Objective: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is known as a crucial zoonotic foodborne pathogen. Totally, 257 raw chicken meat were collected from markets in Hamadan, west of Iran. The samples were cultured on selective culture media and the virulence genes of E. coli isolates were analyzed by PCR. The antibiotic resistance patterns were determined by the disk diffusion method. The genetic relatedness of the E. coli O157 isolates was analyzed by ERIC-PCR. Results: Totally, 93 (36%; 95% CI 41.9- 30.1%) isolates were identified as E. coli. Based on microbiological tests, 36 (38.7%; 95% CI 48.6-28.8), 7 (7.5%; 95% CI 12.8-2.2%), and 12 (12.9%; 95% CI 19.7- 6.1%) of the E. coli isolates were characterized as STEC, Enteropathogenic E. coli, and attaching and effacing E. coli (AEEC) strains, respectively. A high level of resistance to nalidixic acid (91.4%; 95% CI 97.1- 85.7%), tetracycline (89.8%; 95% CI 96.2-83.5%), ampicillin (82.8%; 95% CI 90.2-75.1%), and sulfametoxazole-trimotoprime (71%; 95% CI 80.2-61.8%) was detected among the E. coli isolates. The analysis of ERIC-PCR results showed five different ERIC types among the E. coli O157 isolates. Based on findings, control and check-up of poultry meats should be considered as a crucial issue for public health.


2021 ◽  
Vol 2021 ◽  
pp. 1-6
Author(s):  
Kiandokht Babolhavaeji ◽  
Leili Shokoohizadeh ◽  
Morteza Yavari ◽  
Abbas Moradi ◽  
Mohammad Yousef Alikhani

Background. The aims of the current study are the identification of O157 and non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups isolated from fresh raw beef meat samples in an industrial slaughterhouse, determination of antimicrobial resistance patterns, and genetic linkage of STEC isolates. Materials and Methods. A total of 110 beef samples were collected from the depth of the rump of cattle slaughtered at Hamadan industrial slaughterhouse. After detection of E. coli isolates, STEC strains were identified according to PCR for stx1, stx2, eaeA, and hlyA virulence genes, and STEC serogroups (O157 and non-O157) were identified by PCR. The genetic linkage of STEC isolates was analyzed by the ERIC- (Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus-) PCR method. The antimicrobial susceptibility of STEC isolates was detected by the disk diffusion method according to CLSI guidelines. Results. Among 110 collected beef samples, 77 (70%) were positive for E. coli. The prevalence of STEC in E. coli isolates was 8 (10.4%). The overall prevalence of O157 and non-O157 STEC isolates was 12.5% (one isolate) and 87.5% (7 isolates), respectively. The hemolysin gene was detected in 25% (2 isolates) of STEC strains. Evaluation of antibiotic resistance indicated that 100% of STEC isolates were resistant to ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, and cefazolin. Resistance to tetracycline and ciprofloxacin was detected in 62.5% and 12.5% of isolates, respectively. The analysis of the ERIC-PCR results showed five different ERIC types among the STEC isolates. Conclusion. The isolation of different clones STECs from beef and the presence of antibiotic-resistant isolates indicate that more attention should be paid to the hygiene of slaughterhouses.


2019 ◽  
Author(s):  
omid zarei ◽  
Leili Shokoohizadeh(Former Corresponding Author) ◽  
Hadi Hossainpour ◽  
Mohammad Yousef Alikhani(New Corresponding Author)

Abstract Objective: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is known as a crucial zoonotic foodborne pathogen. A total of 257 raw chicken meat samples were collected from different markets in Hamadan, west of Iran, from January 2016 to May 2017. The samples were cultured on selective and differential culture media and the virulence genes of E. coli isolates were analyzed by PCR assay. The antibiotic resistance patterns of E. coli isolates were determined by the disk diffusion method. The genetic relatedness of the E. coli O157 isolates was analyzed by ERIC-PCR. Results: In total, 93 (36%) of the isolates were identified as E. coli in this study. Based on serological and microbiological tests, 36 (38.7%), 7 (7.5%), and 12 (12.9%) of the E. coli isolates were characterized as STEC, Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and attaching and effacing E. coli (AEEC) strains, respectively. A high level of resistance to nalidixic acid (91.4%), tetracycline (89.8), ampicillin (82.8%), and sulfametoxazole-trimotoprime (71%) was detected among the E. coli isolates. The analysis of the ERIC-PCR results showed five different ERIC types among the E. coli O157 isolates. Based on our findings, control and check-up of poultry meats should be considered as a crucial issue for public health.


2019 ◽  
Author(s):  
omid zarei ◽  
Leili Shokoohizadeh ◽  
Hadi Hossainpour ◽  
Mohammad Yousef Alikhani

Abstract Objective: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is known as a crucial zoonotic foodborne pathogen. Totally, 257 raw chicken meat were collected from markets in Hamadan, west of Iran. The samples were cultured on selective media and the virulence genes of E. coli isolates were analyzed by PCR. The antibiotic resistance patterns were determined by the disk diffusion method. The genetic relatedness of the E. coli O157 isolates was analyzed by ERIC-PCR. Results: Totally, 93 (36%; 95% CI 41.9- 30.1%) isolates were identified as E. coli. Based on microbiological tests, 36 (38.7%; 95% CI 48.6-28.8), 7 (7.5%; 95% CI 12.8-2.2%), and 12 (12.9%; 95% CI 19.7- 6.1%) of the E. coli isolates were characterized as STEC, Enteropathogenic E. coli, and attaching and effacing E. coli (AEEC) strains, respectively. A high level of resistance to nalidixic acid (91.4%; 95% CI 97.1- 85.7%), tetracycline (89.8%; 95% CI 96.2-83.5%), ampicillin (82.8%; 95% CI 90.2-75.1%), and sulfametoxazole-trimotoprime (71%; 95% CI 80.2-61.8%) was detected among the E. coli isolates. The analysis of ERIC-PCR results showed five different ERIC types among the E. coli O157 isolates. Based on findings. Control and check-up of poultry meats should be considered as a crucial issue for public health.


2001 ◽  
Vol 67 (7) ◽  
pp. 3110-3114 ◽  
Author(s):  
Michael A. Grant ◽  
Stephen D. Weagant ◽  
Peter Feng

ABSTRACT The enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is prevalent inEscherichia coli but few strains in the various pathogenicE. coli groups have been tested for GAD. Using PCR primers that amplify a 670-bp segment from the gadA andgadB genes encoding GAD, we examined the distribution of the gadAB genes among enteric bacteria. Analysis of 173 pathogenic E. coli strains, including 125 enterohemorrhagicE. coli isolates of the O157:H7 serotype and its phenotypic variants and 48 isolates of enteropathogenic E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteroinvasive E. coli, and other Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) serotypes, showed that gadAB genes were present in all these strains. Among the 22 non-E. coli isolates tested, only the 6 Shigella spp. carried gadAB. Analysis of naturally contaminated water and food samples using agadAB-specific DNA probe that was labeled with digoxigenin showed that a gadAB-based assay is as reliable as standard methods that enumerate E. coli organisms on the basis of lactose fermentation. The presence of few E. coli cells initially seeded into produce rinsates could be detected by PCR togadA/B genes after overnight enrichment. A multiplex PCR assay using the gadAB primers in combination with primers to Shiga toxin (Stx) genes stx 1 andstx 2 was effective in detecting STEC from the enrichment medium after seeding produce rinsate samples with as few as 2 CFU. The gadAB primers may be multiplexed with primers to other trait virulence markers to specifically identify other pathogenicE. coli groups.


2018 ◽  
Vol 9 ◽  
Author(s):  
Rosely Martins Gioia-Di Chiacchio ◽  
Marcos Paulo Vieira Cunha ◽  
Lilian Rose Marques de Sá ◽  
Yamê Minieiro Davies ◽  
Camila Bueno Pacheco Pereira ◽  
...  

2008 ◽  
Vol 71 (10) ◽  
pp. 2082-2086 ◽  
Author(s):  
LUCIANO BENEDUCE ◽  
GIUSEPPE SPANO ◽  
ARI Q. NABI ◽  
FRANCESCO LAMACCHIA ◽  
SALVATORE MASSA ◽  
...  

In this study, 100 raw meat samples were collected from 15 local Moroccan butcheries in five different areas of the city of Rabat during a period of 4 months. Overall, 7 of 15 butcheries from three areas of the city yielded strains of Escherichia coli O157. Single isolates from 9 (9%) of 100 raw meat samples were biochemically and serologically confirmed as E. coli O157. Using molecular techniques, two strains were positive for the Shiga toxin, with two additional strains containing an attaching-effacing gene. All potentially virulent serotypes isolated from these meat samples showed distinct pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. Based on antibiotic susceptibility testing, more than 70% of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin and clavulanic acid–amoxicillin. Moreover, one strain was resistant to more than three antibiotics. Our study represents the first survey of E. coli O157 and related serotypes in raw meat products in Morocco.


2012 ◽  
Vol 92 (1) ◽  
pp. 18-23 ◽  
Author(s):  
Claudia de Oliveira Ayala ◽  
Ana Carolina Ramos Moreno ◽  
Marina Baquerizo Martinez ◽  
Ylanna Kelner Burgos ◽  
Antonio Fernando Pestana de Castro ◽  
...  

2015 ◽  
Vol 53 (7) ◽  
pp. 2148-2153 ◽  
Author(s):  
Xuan Qin ◽  
Eileen J. Klein ◽  
Emmanouil Galanakis ◽  
Anita A. Thomas ◽  
Jennifer R. Stapp ◽  
...  

Timely accurate diagnosis of Shiga toxin-producingEscherichia coli(STEC) infections is important. We evaluated a laboratory-developed real-time PCR (LD-PCR) assay targetingstx1,stx2, andrfbEO157with 2,386 qualifying stool samples submitted to the microbiology laboratory of a tertiary care pediatric center between July 2011 and December 2013. Broth cultures of PCR-positive samples were tested for Shiga toxins by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (ImmunoCard STAT! enterohemorrhagicE. coli[EHEC]; Meridian Bioscience) and cultured in attempts to recover both O157 and non-O157 STEC.E. coliO157 and non-O157 STEC were detected in 35 and 18 cases, respectively. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) occurred in 12 patients (10 infected with STEC O157, one infected with STEC O125ac, and one with PCR evidence of STEC but no resulting isolate). Among the 59 PCR-positive STEC specimens from 53 patients, only 29 (54.7%) of the associated specimens were toxin positive by EIA. LD-PCR differentiated STEC O157 from non-O157 usingrfbEO157, and LD-PCR results prompted successful recovery ofE. coliO157 (n= 25) and non-O157 STEC (n= 8) isolates, although the primary cultures and toxin assays were frequently negative. A rapid “mega”-multiplex PCR (FilmArray gastrointestinal panel; BioFire Diagnostics) was used retrospectively, and results correlated with LD-PCR findings in 25 (89%) of the 28 sorbitol-MacConkey agar culture-negative STEC cases. These findings demonstrate that PCR is more sensitive than EIA and/or culture and distinguishes between O157 and non-O157 STEC in clinical samples and thatE. coliO157:H7 remains the predominant cause of HUS in our institution. PCR is highly recommended for rapid diagnosis of pediatric STEC infections.


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