The use of ondansetron for the treatment of nausea in dogs with vestibular syndrome

2021 ◽  
Vol 17 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
S. Foth ◽  
S. Meller ◽  
H. Kenward ◽  
J. Elliott ◽  
L. Pelligand ◽  
...  

Abstract Background Vestibular syndrome is often accompanied by nausea. Drugs currently approved for its treatment have been developed to stop vomiting but not nausea. The efficacy of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists to reduce nausea has been described for chemotherapy, but not for nausea secondary to vestibular disorders. Methods Sixteen dogs with vestibular syndrome-associated nausea were included in the open-label, multicentre study. The intensity of nausea-like behaviour was analysed before ondansetron administration (0.5 mg/kg i.v.) and 2 h afterwards, using a validated 5-point-scale. The occurrence and frequency of salivation, lip licking, restlessness, vocalisation, lethargy, and vomiting were assessed. Results All dogs initially showed signs of nausea, whereas only 31% showed vomitus. The intensity of nausea was significantly reduced in all dogs (p ≤ 0.0001) 2 h after ondansetron administration, including the clinical signs of nausea analysed in 11 dogs (salivation [p = 0.0078], lip licking [p = 0.0078], restlessness [p = 0.0039], and lethargy [p = 0.0078]) except for vocalisation (p > 0.9999). Conclusions The results provide preliminary evidence of the potential benefit of ondansetron in the treatment of nausea, which was present in all examined dogs. Vomiting was only observed in 5 dogs indicating that nausea can occur separately and should not be perceived only as a preceding stimulation of the vomiting centre.

2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
S. Foth ◽  
S. Meller ◽  
H. Kenward ◽  
J. Elliot ◽  
L. Pelligand ◽  
...  

Abstract Background: Vestibular syndrome is often accompanied by nausea. Drugs currently approved for its treatment have been developed to stop vomiting but not nausea. The efficacy of 5‑HT3 receptor antagonists to reduce nausea has been described for chemotherapy, but not for nausea secondary to vestibular disorders.Methods: Sixteen dogs with vestibular syndrome-associated nausea were included in the open-label, multicentric study. The intensity of nausea-like behaviour was analysed before ondansetron administration (0.5 mg/kg i.v.) and 2 h afterwards, using a validated 5-point-scale. The occurrence and frequency of salivation, lip licking, restlessness, vocalisation, lethargy, and vomiting were assessed.Results: All dogs initially showed signs of nausea, whereas only 31% showed vomitus. The intensity of nausea was significantly reduced in all dogs (p≤0.0001) 2 h after ondansetron administration, including the clinical signs of nausea analysed in 11 dogs (salivation [p=0.0078], lip licking [p=0.0078], restlessness [p=0.0039], and lethargy [p=0.0078]) except for vocalisation (p>0.9999).Conclusion: The results provide preliminary evidence of the potential benefit of ondansetron in the treatment of nausea, which was present in all examined dogs. Vomiting was only observed in 5 dogs indicating that nausea can occur separately and should not be perceived only as a preceding stimulation of the vomiting centre.


2017 ◽  
Vol 4 (4) ◽  
pp. 285-294 ◽  
Author(s):  
Nir Lipsman ◽  
Eileen Lam ◽  
Matthew Volpini ◽  
Kalam Sutandar ◽  
Richelle Twose ◽  
...  

Author(s):  
Anita Abeyesekera ◽  
Scott Adams ◽  
Cynthia Mancinelli ◽  
Thea Knowles ◽  
Greydon Gilmore ◽  
...  

ABSTRACT:Objective: To systematically evaluate how different deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) amplitude, frequency, and pulse-width electrical parameter settings impact speech intensity, voice quality, and prosody of speech in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods: Ten individuals with PD receiving bilateral STN-DBS treatments were seen for three baseline and five treatment visits. The five treatment visits involved an examination of the standard clinical settings as well as manipulation of different combinations of frequency (low, mid, and high), pulse width (low, mid, and high), and voltage (low, mid, and high) of stimulation. Measures of speech intensity, jitter, shimmer, harmonics–noise ratio, semitone standard deviation, and listener ratings of voice quality and prosody were obtained for each STN-DBS manipulation. Results: The combinations of lower frequency, lower pulse width, and higher voltage settings were associated with improved speech outcomes compared to the current standard clinical settings. In addition, decreased total electrical energy delivered to the STN appears to be associated with speech improvements. Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence that STN-DBS may be optimized for Parkinson-related problems with voice quality, speech intensity, and prosody of speech.


2018 ◽  
Vol 12 (supplement_1) ◽  
pp. S016-S017 ◽  
Author(s):  
S Danese ◽  
B Feagan ◽  
W Sandborn ◽  
J -F Colombel ◽  
S Vermeire ◽  
...  

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