diversity and inclusion
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2022 ◽  
pp. 084653712110661
Author(s):  
Tyler D. Yan ◽  
Lauren E. Mak ◽  
Evelyn F. Carroll ◽  
Faisal Khosa ◽  
Charlotte J. Yong-Hing

Purpose: Transgender and gender non-binary (TGNB) individuals face numerous inequalities in healthcare and there is substantial work to be done in fostering TGNB culturally competent care in radiology. A radiology department’s online presence and use of gender-inclusive language are essential in promoting an environment of equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI). The naming of radiology fellowships and continuing medical education (CME) courses with terminology such as “Women’s Imaging” indicates a lack of inclusivity to TGNB patients and providers, which could result in suboptimal patient care. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of all institutions in Canada and the United States (US) offering training in Breast Imaging, Women’s Imaging, or Breast and Body Imaging. Data was collected from each institution’s radiology department website pertaining to fellowship names, EDI involvement, and CME courses. Results: 8 Canadian and 71 US radiology fellowships were identified. 75% of Canadian and 90% of US fellowships had gender-inclusive names. One (12.5%) Canadian and 29 (41%) US institutions had EDI Committees mentioned on their websites. Among institutions publicly displaying CME courses about breast/body or women’s imaging, gender-inclusive names were used in only 1 (25%) of the Canadian CME courses, compared to 81% of the US institutions. Conclusions: Most institutions in Canada and the US have gender-inclusive names for their radiology fellowships pertaining to breast and body imaging. However, there is much opportunity to and arguably the responsibility for institutions in both countries to increase the impact and visibility of their EDI efforts through creation of department-specific committees and CME courses.


The transgender community, one of the most marginalized communities, faces a range of discriminatory issues in workplaces and educational institutions. The study seeks to investigate the extent of organizational support ensured by the workplaces to create a transgender-friendly environment in Bangladesh. The paper opted for a mixed study and surveyed 47 trans workers using a questionnaire. The responses yielded quantitative data that was analyzed using SPSS. The qualitative data was collected through focus group discussions with seven respondents. The study findings showed that the discrimination and exclusion experience is negative for trans workers of Bangladeshi organizations and educational institutions. While most of the respondents felt primarily excluded in the formal setting, they feel that they have been intentionally left out when they meet their coworkers in informal or social gatherings. The outcomes of the discrimination involved forced termination and absenteeism on the ground of their non-binary gender identity. It was also found that many Bangladeshi organizations still do not want trans workers to represent them. To the best of researchers’ understanding, the past research on the transgender community’s diversity and inclusion experience in organizations is rarely covered from the developing country’s perspective. This paper attempts to fulfill the study gap. Recommendations for good practices to ensure diversity is proposed to companies. Creating a more inclusive workplace is expected to create a robust economic and social impact for developing countries like Bangladesh. Keywords: Bangladesh, Discrimination, Diversity, Inclusion, Trans workers, Trans-friendly environment, Organizations


Author(s):  
Rachel Franchina ◽  
Rachel Collins ◽  
Chris Colvin ◽  
Aleksandra Pitt ◽  
Linda Merigliano ◽  
...  

Public land management is inherently complex and requires a systems approach that integrates ecological, economic, and social values. Currently, there are few tools and examples available for federal land management planning that use a systems approach. Issues are often approached from a disciplinary perspective, and outdoor recreation problems, assumptions, and solutions often focus too narrowly on how to mitigate recreation impacts as opposed to understanding the broader role of visitor use and access, public engagement, and public health in sustainable land management. The Visitor Use Management Framework (the Framework), developed by the Interagency Visitor Use Management Council (IVUMC, 2016) provides interagency guidance for managing public use on federal lands and waters. The Framework uses a process that can be incorporated into existing agency planning and decision making. It follows all of the Council agencies’ (NPS, BLM, USFS, USFWS, ACoE, NOAA) planning principles and illustrates how to specifically address visitor experiences and resource protection with an integrated planning approach. This research note explores the evolving role of the Framework in sustainable recreation management and how public health, public engagement, and representation, inclusion, and access can be incorporated throughout the Framework to ensure planning decisions meet the needs, values, and preferences of diverse user groups. Further, this paper invites a broader discussion around next steps for boldly moving to integrate public health, public engagement, and representation, inclusion, and access more fully into all aspects of visitor use management, including the Framework. Collective effort and ongoing innovation is needed to ensure that the Framework is thoughtfully implemented in ways that provide opportunities to enhance outdoor recreation access and inclusion for a broader range of people.


Surgery Today ◽  
2022 ◽  
Author(s):  
Chie Takasu ◽  
Emiko Kono ◽  
Yuji Morine ◽  
Kozo Yoshikawa ◽  
Takuya Tokunaga ◽  
...  

Computers ◽  
2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 12
Author(s):  
Majid Zamiri ◽  
Luis M. Camarinha-Matos ◽  
João Sarraipa

The application of mass collaboration in different areas of study and work has been increasing over the last few decades. For example, in the education context, this emerging paradigm has opened new opportunities for participatory learning, namely, “mass collaborative learning (MCL)”. The development of such an innovative and complementary method of learning, which can lead to the creation of knowledge-based communities, has helped to reap the benefits of diversity and inclusion in the creation and development of knowledge. In other words, MCL allows for enhanced connectivity among the people involved, providing them with the opportunity to practice learning collectively. Despite recent advances, this area still faces many challenges, such as a lack of common agreement about the main concepts, components, applicable structures, relationships among the participants, as well as applicable assessment systems. From this perspective, this study proposes a meta-governance framework that benefits from various other related ideas, models, and methods that together can better support the implementation, execution, and development of mass collaborative learning communities. The proposed framework was applied to two case-study projects in which vocational education and training respond to the needs of collaborative education–enterprise approaches. It was also further used in an illustration of the MCL community called the “community of cooks”. Results from these application cases are discussed.


2022 ◽  
Author(s):  
Filippo Salustri ◽  
Erica Attard ◽  
Michael Grieg ◽  
W. Patrick Neumann

<div>The instructors of the undergraduate cornerstone design course in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at Ryerson University aim to integrate diversity and inclusion into students’ design education. Our goal is to provide resources that students can use to understand human capabilities and limitations, so their designs are better suited to a wide range of users. The project was broken down in four phases: Phase 1 consisted of scoping deliverables and background research; Phase 2 included courseware development; Phase 3 employed the courseware into the Fall 2019 offering of our cornerstone design course; and Phase 4 reviewed and analysed student’s work to determine the efficacy of the courseware.</div><div>To initiate this effort, we focused on three Human Factors: vision, hearing, and strength. We created a process whereby students could assess these Factors quantitatively for specific interactions and use the assessments to justify specific functional requirements and constraints of their own designs.</div>


2022 ◽  
Author(s):  
Filippo Salustri ◽  
Erica Attard ◽  
Michael Grieg ◽  
W. Patrick Neumann

<div>The instructors of the undergraduate cornerstone design course in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at Ryerson University aim to integrate diversity and inclusion into students’ design education. Our goal is to provide resources that students can use to understand human capabilities and limitations, so their designs are better suited to a wide range of users. The project was broken down in four phases: Phase 1 consisted of scoping deliverables and background research; Phase 2 included courseware development; Phase 3 employed the courseware into the Fall 2019 offering of our cornerstone design course; and Phase 4 reviewed and analysed student’s work to determine the efficacy of the courseware.</div><div>To initiate this effort, we focused on three Human Factors: vision, hearing, and strength. We created a process whereby students could assess these Factors quantitatively for specific interactions and use the assessments to justify specific functional requirements and constraints of their own designs.</div>


Author(s):  
Brad A. Meisner

Abstract This article contains excerpts from the opening and closing remarks delivered at CAG2021 – the Annual Scientific and Educational Meeting of the Canadian Association on Gerontology (CAG) – which was hosted virtually from October 21 to 23, 2021. This event commemorated CAG’s 50th anniversary and included 645 delegates from across Canada and the world. The conference theme, “Hindsight 20/20: Looking Back for a Vision Forward in Gerontology,” focused on the burgeoning gerontological work that examines the various and complex ways that COVID-19 has affected older people and aging, as well as the need to develop a stronger emphasis on justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion in the field of gerontology.


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