cirrhinus mrigala
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2023 ◽  
Vol 83 ◽  
Author(s):  
S. Tabassum ◽  
S. M. Hussain ◽  
S. Ali ◽  
M. Zubair-ul-Hassan Arsalan ◽  
B. Ahmad ◽  
...  

Abstract Fish protein is serving as a source of nutrition for protein starving world. However, sustainable aquaculture products require inexpensive plant by-products due to finite sources of fish meal. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine nutrient utilization, growth performance and hematological indices of Cirrhinus mrigala fingerlings fed on Moringa oleifera leaf meal (MOLM) based diets. Fish were fed with six isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets having MOLM as a substitute of fish meal (FM) at the levels of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% for the period of 90 days. Fingerlings having initial weight 6.35±0.04g were reared in triplicate tanks at the stocking density of 15 and hand fed at the rate of 5% of total biomass twice regularly. Chromic oxide inclusion level was 1% in diets. After analysis, maximum growth performance and improved digestibility of nutrients were found in fish fed with diet at 10% replacement level as compared to fish fed on control diet and other test diets. Additionally, it was found that the red blood cells, white blood cells, hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration of fish showed a significantly (p<0.05) inverse correlation with the increase in MOLM. In present research, it was concluded that MOLM has good potential to be used as a FM substitute in C. mrigala diet with maximum effect at 10% showing positive hematological indices.


2023 ◽  
Vol 83 ◽  
Author(s):  
M. Zubair-ul-Hassan Arsalan ◽  
S. M. Hussain ◽  
S. Ali ◽  
B. Ahmad ◽  
A. Sharif

Abstract Fishmeal; being a limited and costly feed ingredient is continuously been substituted with locally available plant proteins. However, the occurrence of anti-nutritional factors in plant meal suppresses its potential to be fully replaced. Therefore, in this study we aimed to study the synergistic effects of dietary additives like citric acid and phytase enzyme supplementation on growth performance and nutrient digestibility of Cirrhinus mrigala fingerlings. Canola meal (CM) was used as a test ingredient to replace fishmeal (FM) as; 0%, 25%, 50% and 75%. These four diets were further supplemented by varying levels of phytase (0 and 750 FTU kg-1) and citric acid (0% and 2.5%) to formulate total sixteen test diets as T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7, T8, T9, T10, T11, T12, T13, T14, T15 and T16. Each treatment contained three replicates; applied to fish groups having 15 fingerlings each; following 3×3 factorial arrangement. 1% of chromic oxide was added as an inert marker. Maximum weight gain% (288%) and the lowest value of FCR (1.07) were recorded when fish was fed on diet T12 as compared to fish fed control diet (T1). Similarly, optimum nutrient digestibility values such as crude protein (77%), crude fat (84%) and gross energy (70%) were noted on same level. It was concluded that 50% canola meal can optimally replace fishmeal when supplemented with phytase and citric acid at the levels of 750 FTU kg-1 and 2.5%, respectively.


2023 ◽  
Vol 83 ◽  
Author(s):  
F. Asad ◽  
A. Ashraf ◽  
A. Rafique ◽  
S. Qamer ◽  
S. Naz ◽  
...  

Abstract A ninety days nutritional trial was directed to explore the effects of dietary chromium on body composition, gut enzyme activity and physiological status of Cirrhinus mrigala by using G & NG corn. Six experimental diets were prepared by using different levels of chromium chloride hexahydrate (0, 0.2, 0.4 mg/kg, each with G & NG corn). For this experimental trial, 480 fingerlings, irrespective of sex were distributed in six aquariums each with replicate. Results revealed that gelatinized corn along with increasing level of Cr2Cl3.6H2O have a positive impact upon body composition of fish. Hematology was positively correlated with chromium chloride hexahydrate supplementation in gelatinized corn. Amylase gut enzyme also showed significant (P<0.05) increase in group fed with chromium chloride hexahydrate supplemented diet (G corn). However, corn with chromium chloride hexahydrate supplementation did not revealed any significant impact on gut protease enzyme activity. From these results it can be concluded that both chromium chloride hexahydrate and gelatinized corn in fish feed are very beneficial to improve body composition, enzymes activity and physiological health status of fish.


2023 ◽  
Vol 83 ◽  
Author(s):  
F. Sughra ◽  
M. Hafeez-ur Rahman ◽  
F. Abbas ◽  
I. Altaf

Abstract Aeromonas hydrophila is a cause of infectious disease outbreaks in carp species cultured in South Asian countries including Pakistan. This bacterium has gained resistance to a wide range of antibiotics and robust preventive measures are necessary to control its spread. No prior use of fish vaccines has been reported in Pakistan. The present study aims to develop and evaluate inactivated vaccines against local strain of A. hydrophila in Pakistan with alum-precipitate as adjuvant. The immunogenic potential of vaccine was evaluated in two Indian major carps (Rohu: Labeo rohita, Mori: Cirrhinus mrigala) and a Chinese carp (Grass carp: Ctenopharyngodon idella). Fish were vaccinated intraperitoneally followed by a challenge through immersion. Fish with an average age of 4-5 months were randomly distributed in three vaccinated groups with three vaccine concentrations of 108, 109 and 1010 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml and a control group. Fixed dose of 0.1ml was applied to each fish on 1st day and a booster dose at 15 days post-vaccination (DPV). Blood samples were collected on 14, 28, 35, 48 and 60 DPV to determine antibody titers in blood serum using compliment fixation test (CFT). Fish were challenged at 60 DPV with infectious A. hydrophila with 108 CFU/ml through immersion. Significantly higher levels of antibody titers were observed from 28 DPV in all vaccinated groups as compared to those in the control group. In challenge experiment the average RPS (relative percent survivability) was 71% for groups vaccinated with 109 and 1010 CFU/ml and 86% for 108 CFU/ml. Vaccine with 108 CFU/ml induced highest immune response followed by 109 and 1010 CFU/ml. The immune response of L. rohita and C. idella was better than that of C. mrigala. In general, normal histopathology was observed in different organs of vaccinated fish whereas minor deteriorative changes were found in fish vaccinated with higher concentrations of the vaccine.


Fishes ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 6 (4) ◽  
pp. 56
Author(s):  
Pravata Kumar Pradhan ◽  
Dev Kumar Verma ◽  
Shrish Chandra Yadav ◽  
Atul Krishna Dev ◽  
Thangaraj Raja Swaminathan ◽  
...  

Tilapia tilapinevirus, also known as tilapia lake virus (TiLV), is an emerging fish virus that primarily affects tilapines. However, the virus has also been detected in a few non-tilapines. As tilapia is generally farmed in polyculture systems along with carps in South Asian countries, there is a likelihood that TiLV-infected tilapia can transmit the virus to the co-cultured species. In view of the above, the susceptibility of three carp species, namely catla (Catla catla), mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala) and silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) was evaluated vis-à-vis tilapia, following experimental infection with TiLV. No clinical signs and histopathological alterations could be observed in carps. RT-qPCR revealed that TiLV copy numbers in liver and brain of all the three carps were almost negligible and did not show any increase with time, suggesting that the virus did not replicate in liver and brain, the target organs of TiLV. Further, TiLV could not be isolated from pooled liver and brain tissues of carps using permissive CFF cell line. On the contrary, in tilapia, typical clinical signs and histopathological lesions were observed and there was significant increase in TiLV copy number up to 6 days post-injection. Furthermore, the virus was successfully isolated from pooled liver and brain tissue of infected tilapia. From the above findings, it could be concluded that C. catla, C. mrigala and H. molitrix are resistant to TiLV infection and unlikely to be carriers for this virus.


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