Northern Distribution
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Author(s):  
Karin Bakran-Lebl ◽  
Hans Jerrentrup ◽  
Eleni Daroglou ◽  
Wolf Peter Pfitzner ◽  
Hans-Peter Fuehrer ◽  
...  

AbstractAedes pulcritarsis is a tree-hole breeding species with its main distribution in the Mediterranean area. Within the scope of two independent monitoring programmes, this mosquito species was detected for the first time in Austria, in the province of Lower Austria (2018, districts Mistelbach and Gaenserndorf; 2020, district Bruck an der Leitha). As the climatic and habitat situation in Central Europe seems to be generally suitable for this species, the most likely explanation for the species not being recorded previously is that it might have been overlooked in the past due to its specialized breeding habitat. However, further research on the distribution of Ae. pulcritarsis in Austria would be needed to support this hypothesis. The results from this study will contribute to the investigation of the northern distribution limit of Ae. pulcritarsis in Europe and possible changes thereof.


2021 ◽  
Vol 50 (3) ◽  
pp. 278-298
Author(s):  
Ton van Haaren

Abstract Two trumpet worms (Pectinariidae), which do not resemble the two known species: Lagis koreni Malmgren, 1866 and Amphictene auricoma (Müller, 1776), have recently been collected in the Dutch North Sea (Oyster Grounds). Their characteristics match those of Pectinaria belgica (Pallas, 1766), a species with a northern distribution. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge of Dutch Pectinariidae and describes in detail the historical records of trumpet worms recorded in the Netherlands, along with the confusion around the species epithet belgica. Pectinaria belgica is reported here for the first time from the Dutch North Sea.


2021 ◽  
Vol 487 ◽  
pp. 119024
Author(s):  
Arno Fritz das Neves Brandes ◽  
Rafael Perpétuo Albuquerque ◽  
Claudio Sergio Lisi ◽  
Davi Neves de Lemos ◽  
Luca Ribeiro Mendes Nicola ◽  
...  

2021 ◽  
Vol 14 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Nicolas De Pelsmaeker ◽  
Lars Korslund ◽  
Øyvind Steifetten

Abstract Background During the last decades a northward and upward range shift has been observed among many organisms across different taxa. In the northern hemisphere, ticks have been observed to have increased their latitudinal and altitudinal range limit. However, the elevational expansion at its northern distribution range remains largely unstudied. In this study we investigated the altitudinal distribution of the exophilic Ixodes ricinus and endophilic I. trianguliceps on two mountain slopes in Norway by assessing larval infestation rates on bank voles (Myodes glareolus). Methods During 2017 and 2018, 1325 bank voles were captured during the spring, summer and autumn at ten trapping stations ranging from 100 m to 1000 m.a.s.l. in two study areas in southern Norway. We used generalized logistic regression models to estimate the prevalence of infestation of both tick species along gradients of altitude, considering study area, collection year and season, temperature, humidity and altitude interactions as extrinsic variables, and host body mass and sex as intrinsic predictor variables. Results We found that both I. ricinus and I. trianguliceps infested bank voles at altitudes up to 1000 m.a.s.l., which is a substantial increase in altitude compared to previous findings for I. ricinus in this region. The infestation rates declined more rapidly with increasing altitude for I. ricinus compared to I. trianguliceps, indicating that the endophilic ecology of I. trianguliceps may provide shelter from limiting factors tied to altitude. Seasonal effects limited the occurrence of I. ricinus during autumn, but I. trianguliceps was found to infest rodents at all altitudes during all seasons of both years. Conclusions This study provides new insights into the altitudinal distribution of two tick species at their northern distribution range, one with the potential to transmit zoonotic pathogens to both humans and livestock. With warming temperatures predicted to increase, and especially so in the northern regions, the risk of tick-borne infections is likely to become a concern at increasingly higher altitudes in the future.


Crustaceana ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 94 (2) ◽  
pp. 251-261
Author(s):  
Michel E. Hendrickx

Abstract Two species of Euryplacidae were collected in western Mexico. Trizocarcinus dentatus (12 localities) and Euryplax polita (4 localities) were both found in the Gulf of California. In the case of E. polita 11 specimens (5 males, 5 females, one ovigerous female) were obtained, while in the case of T. dentatus 42 specimens (25 males, 10 females, 7 ovigerous females) were collected. The northern distribution limit of E. polita is extended to the northern Gulf of California (28°16′N 111°36′W). Environmental data for both species are provided, including depth range, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and sediment composition.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Nicolas De Pelsmaeker ◽  
Lars Korslund ◽  
Øyvind Steifetten

Abstract Background: During the last decades a northward and upward range shift has been observed among many organisms across different taxa. In the northern hemisphere, ticks have been observed to have increased their latitudinal and altitudinal range limit. However, the elevational expansion at its northern distribution range remains largely unstudied. In this study we investigated the altitudinal distribution of the exophilic Ixodes ricinus and endophilic I. trianguliceps on two mountain slopes in Norway by assessing larval infestation rates on bank voles (Myodes glareolus).Methods: During 2017 and 2018, 1325 bank voles were captured during spring, summer and autumn at 10 trapping stations ranging from 100 m to 1000 m.a.s.l. in two study areas in southern Norway. We used generalized logistic regression models to estimate the prevalence of infestation of both tick species along altitude, considering study area, collection year and season, temperature, humidity and altitude interactions as extrinsic variables; and host body mass and sex as intrinsic predictor variables.Results: We found that both I. ricinus and I. trianguliceps infested bank voles at altitudes up to 1000 m.a.s.l., which is a substantial increase in altitude compared to previous findings for I. ricinus in this region. The infestation rates declined more rapidly for I. ricinus compared to I. trianguliceps, indicating that the endophilic ecology of I. trianguliceps may provide shelter from limiting factors tied to altitude. Seasonal effects limited the occurrence of I. ricinus during autumn, but I. trianguliceps was found to infest rodents at all altitudes during all seasons of both years.Conclusions: This study provides new insights into the altitudinal distribution of two tick species at their northern distributional range, one with the potential to transmit zoonotic pathogens to both humans and livestock. With warming temperatures predicted to increase, and especially so in the northern regions, the risk of tick-borne infections is likely to become a concern at increasingly higher altitudes in the future.


Author(s):  
Pavol Eliáš ◽  
Zuzana Dítě ◽  
Mariana Eliášová ◽  
Daniel Dítě

Ranunculus pedatus is a Eurasian species with a northern distribution edge in southern Slovakia. In the nineties of the 20th century, it was assumed that the species probably occurs only near Štúrovo. Occurrence in the Hron and Ipeľ basins and several localities in the Podunajská nížina lowland between Komárno and Štúrovo was considered historical. Our research was conducted in the field and herbarium collections of 15 herbaria in Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Slovakia. Except for the well-known occurrence on salt habitats north of Štúrovo, we confirmed the recent occurrence of R. pedatus in Štúrovo town, around Chľaba village and in Ipeľ Basin (Pastovce, Tupá). The new, easternmost Slovak locality was found near the village of Koláre. Recently, 30% of all known sites were confirmed, so we propose reclassifying the species in Slovak Red List from the category critically endangered (CR) to the category endangered (EN). It occurs in salty meadows of the alliance Festucion pseudovinae (class Festuco-Puccinellietea) and in mesic meadows of alliance Arrhenatherion elatioris and Deschampsion cespitosae (class Molinio-Arrhenatheretea).


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