Community Gardening
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2021 ◽  
Vol 38 (3) ◽  
pp. 39-51
Author(s):  
Min Ah Chung ◽  
Hye Jin Yoon ◽  
Dong Eun Shin ◽  
Ji Eon Kim ◽  
Hae Kyung Kim ◽  
...  

PLoS ONE ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 16 (9) ◽  
pp. e0256913
Author(s):  
Carola Grebitus

The desire for fresh, local food has increased interest in alternative food production approaches, such as private small-scale agriculture, wherein households grow their own food. Accordingly, it is worth investigating private agricultural production, especially in urban areas, given that an increasing share of the world’s population is living in cities. This study analyzed the growth of produce at people’s homes and in community gardens, focusing on behavioral and socio-demographic factors. Data were collected through an online survey in Detroit, Michigan; 420 citizens were interviewed. The results revealed that trust, attitude, and knowledge affect the growing of produce at home. Involvement and personality are also drivers of community gardening. Regarding socio-demographics, household size affects the growing of produce at home, while gender, age, and income affect community gardening. The findings have valuable implications for stakeholders who wish to foster private small-scale urban agriculture, for example, through city planning and nutrition education.


PLoS ONE ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 16 (8) ◽  
pp. e0255621
Author(s):  
Tarsila Lampert ◽  
Joana Costa ◽  
Osvaldo Santos ◽  
Joana Sousa ◽  
Teresa Ribeiro ◽  
...  

Introduction There has been growing interest in community gardens as an effective and affordable health promotion strategy. However, most available evidence is derived from qualitative studies, whereas quantitative research on this subject is limited. Objectives To synthetize the literature about physical and mental health outcomes associated with community gardening. Two main questions were addressed: a) is there evidence, from quantitative studies, that community gardening is associated to physical and mental health and well-being of non-institutionalized individuals? b) Does community gardening provokes any discomfort in terms of physical health, i.e., bodily pain, to their beneficiaries? Methods A systematic review of the literature was carried out following PRISMA guidelines by searching relevant electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science). Empirical, quantitative studies published in English with no restrictions concerning the date of publication were considered eligible. The quality of the evidence was appraised using the tool developed by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies. Results Overall, 8 studies were considered eligible, of which seven studies were rated as having good methodological quality (one scored as fair). Community gardeners had significantly better health outcomes than their neighbours not engaged in gardening activities in terms of life satisfaction, happiness, general health, mental health, and social cohesion. Conclusion Community gardens are associated to health gains for their users, irrespective of age, being an affordable and efficient way of promoting physical and mental health and well-being. To encourage the design, maintenance, and prospective evaluation of supportive urban environments promoting healthy and, at the same time, sustainable lifestyles, is essential to achieve public health gains and environmental sustainability.


2021 ◽  
Vol 75 (Supplement_2) ◽  
pp. 7512515321p1
Author(s):  
Beth Ekelman ◽  
Kelly Bishop ◽  
Erica Hughes ◽  
Allison Kienzle ◽  
Alicia Loreta ◽  
...  
Keyword(s):  

2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Nilesh Bakshi ◽  
Fabricio Chicca ◽  
Andre Brown ◽  
Mark Fletcher

A systematic review of master planning strategies that bring about positive outcomes for the communal space.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Nilesh Bakshi ◽  
Fabricio Chicca ◽  
Andre Brown ◽  
Mark Fletcher

A systematic review of master planning strategies that bring about positive outcomes for the communal space.


Author(s):  
Huaiyun Kou ◽  
Sichu Zhang ◽  
Wenjia Li ◽  
Yuelai Liu

This study aims to examine the impacts of community gardening on the daily life of residents and the management organisation of pandemic prevention in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, a major public health scourge in 2020. The research team applied a participatory action research approach to work with residents to design and implement the Seeding Plan, a contactless community gardening program. The authors carried out a study to compare the everyday conditions reflecting residents’ mental health of the three subject groups during the pandemic: the participants of the Seeding Plan (Group A), the non-participants living in the same communities that had implemented the Seeding Plan (Group B), and the non-participants in other communities (Group C). According to the results, group A showed the best mental health among the three; Group B, positively influenced by seeding activities, was better than Group C. The interview results also confirmed that the community connections established through gardening activities have a significant impact on maintaining a positive social mentality under extraordinary circumstances. From this, the study concluded that gardening activities can improve people’s mental health, effectively resist negative impacts, and it is a convenient tool with spreading influence on the entire community, so as to support the collective response to public health emergencies in a bottom-up direction by the community.


Author(s):  
Shahida Mohd Sharif ◽  
Norsidah Ujang

<p><strong>Aim:</strong> The aim of this concept paper is to identify a conceptual framework to investigate the level of social bonding/social attachment amongst participants of community gardening activity. It is estimated that more than 50% of the population would be living in urban areas by 2050. One of the drivers is the urban migration, where people are relocating themselves to new neighbourhoods, cities or countries often with the hope of better economic opportunities and social infrastructure, therefore changing the landscape of the new society and the place they reside. It is worrying as these people might not receive enough social support due to their limited social network. It could further escalate to social well-being problems such as individualism and social isolation and could later manifest mentally or psychologically as loneliness. <strong>Methodology and Results: </strong>This paper argues that the selection of the type of urban green spaces to be integrated into urban neighbourhoods is critical in addressing the well-being problems. Community gardens, as part of urban green spaces, offer meaningful social interaction opportunities, often being missed in the context of modern societies and urban lifestyle. Therefore, there is a need to review the effects of community gardening activities as an intervention strategy to strengthen the degree of social bonding to identify its capacity in integrating isolated people back into community life. <strong>Conclusion, significance and impact study:</strong> As a conclusion, urban designers and policymakers are suggested to adopt community gardens as a safe open space in cities to encourage more people-people-places interaction.</p>


2021 ◽  
Vol 737 (1) ◽  
pp. 012061
Author(s):  
S M Sharif ◽  
N Ujang

2021 ◽  
pp. 1-18
Author(s):  
Michelle Jacob ◽  
Cecilia Rocha

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