Dietary Flavonoids
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2021 ◽  
Vol 5 (Supplement_1) ◽  
pp. 864-864
Author(s):  
Courtney Millar ◽  
Alyssa Dufour ◽  
Marian Hannan ◽  
Shivani Sahni

Abstract Depression affects more than 250 million people worldwide. Although epidemiological studies have linked higher dietary flavonoids with depression prevention in older women, it is unknown if increasing dietary flavonoids could effectively reduce depression. Mixed berries (blueberry, blackberry, and raspberry) are a rich source of flavonoids, particularly anthocyanin, flavanol, and flavan-3-ol subclasses. Our aim was to determine the association of mixed-berry flavonoid intake with change in depressive symptoms over ~8 years in older adults from the Framingham Heart Study. This community-based prospective longitudinal study included 1,278 adults with assessments on diet (food frequency questionnaire) and depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression, CES-D) at baseline (1998-2001) and follow-up (2005-2008). Absolute change in mixed-berry flavonoid intake (defined as sum of anthocyanin, flavanol, and flavon-3-ols, mg/day) and change in CES-D scores were calculated. Linear regression estimated beta and standard error (SE) for change in CES-D scores per 250 mg/day increase in mixed-berry flavonoids (obtained from ~3/4 cup of mixed berries), adjusting for baseline age, sex, energy-intake, current smoking, body mass index, physical activity, cardiovascular disease, and non-melanoma cancer. Mean age was 59±9 years (range: 33-81), 57% female and mean change in mixed-berry flavonoid intake was 15.0±72.8 mg/day over ~8 years. In adjusted models, each 250 mg/day increase in mixed-berry flavonoid intake was associated with a 1-point reduction in depressive symptoms (beta: -1.06, SE: 0.61, p=0.08) over ~8 years, although this was not statistically significant. These data highlight the need for randomized clinical trials of flavonoid-rich berries to target depressive symptoms in older adults.


2021 ◽  
Vol 5 (Supplement_1) ◽  
pp. 1018-1018
Author(s):  
Thuy Nga Nguyen ◽  
Courtney Millar ◽  
Douglas Kiel ◽  
Marian Hannan ◽  
Shivani Sahni

Abstract Polyphenols (antioxidants derived from plant-foods) could play a role in inhibition of oxidative stress and frailty reduction, yet data on the polyphenol subclass of dietary flavonoids is limited. This study sought to determine the association between dietary flavonoids and frailty onset in middle-aged and older adults. This prospective cohort study included non-frail individuals from the Framingham Offspring Cohort (FOC) with total flavonoid intake (mg/day; defined as sum flavonols, flavan-3-ols, flavonones, flavones, and anthocyanins via Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire), frailty (via Fried phenotype), and covariate information measured at baseline (1998-2001). Follow-up frailty was evaluated in 2011-2014. Logistic regression estimated odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) adjusting for relevant confounders. Participants (n=1,701; 55.5% female) had a mean age of 58.4 years (SD ± 8.3). Mean flavonoid intake was 309 mg/d (SD ± 266). After 12.4 years (SD ± 0.8), 224 (13.2%) individuals exhibited frailty. In age and sex adjusted models, every 50 mg/day of higher total flavonoid intake was associated with 3% reduced odds of frailty [OR (95%CI): 0.97 (0.94-1.00), p-value: 0.05). Further adjustment for smoking, energy and protein intake, and disease indicators did not appreciably change the association, and associations became non-significant (p-value=0.12). Thus, there was no association between flavonoid intake and odds of frailty onset in adults in the FOC. This could be due to participants' higher intake of flavonoids compared to average intake of ~200 mg/d in Americans.


Pharmaceutics ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 13 (11) ◽  
pp. 1895
Author(s):  
Khoshnur Jannat ◽  
Alok K. Paul ◽  
Tohmina A. Bondhon ◽  
Anamul Hasan ◽  
Muhammad Nawaz ◽  
...  

Recent years have witnessed the emergence of several viral diseases, including various zoonotic diseases such as the current pandemic caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Other viruses, which possess pandemic-causing potential include avian flu, Ebola, dengue, Zika, and Nipah virus, as well as the re-emergence of SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) and MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) coronaviruses. Notably, effective drugs or vaccines against these viruses are still to be discovered. All the newly approved vaccines against the SARS-CoV-2-induced disease COVID-19 possess real-time possibility of becoming obsolete because of the development of ‘variants of concern’. Flavonoids are being increasingly recognized as prophylactic and therapeutic agents against emerging and old viral diseases. Around 10,000 natural flavonoid compounds have been identified, being phytochemicals, all plant-based. Flavonoids have been reported to have lesser side effects than conventional anti-viral agents and are effective against more viral diseases than currently used anti-virals. Despite their abundance in plants, which are a part of human diet, flavonoids have the problem of low bioavailability. Various attempts are in progress to increase the bioavailability of flavonoids, one of the promising fields being nanotechnology. This review is a narrative of some anti-viral dietary flavonoids, their bioavailability, and various means with an emphasis on the nanotechnology system(s) being experimented with to deliver anti-viral flavonoids, whose systems show potential in the efficient delivery of flavonoids, resulting in increased bioavailability.


Molecules ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 26 (21) ◽  
pp. 6610
Author(s):  
Ana T. Rufino ◽  
Ana Ramalho ◽  
Adelaide Sousa ◽  
José Miguel P. Ferreira de Oliveira ◽  
Paulo Freitas ◽  
...  

Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) have been increasingly incorporated into food-related and hygiene products for their unique antimicrobial and preservative properties. The consequent oral exposure may then result in unpredicted harmful effects in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), which should be considered in the risk assessment and risk management of these materials. In the present study, the toxic effects of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated AgNP (4 and 19 nm) were evaluated in GIT-relevant cells (Caco-2 cell line as a model of human intestinal cells, and neutrophils as a model of the intestinal inflammatory response). This study also evaluated the putative protective action of dietary flavonoids against such harmful effects. The obtained results showed that AgNP of 4 and 19 nm effectively induced Caco-2 cell death by apoptosis with concomitant production of nitric oxide, irrespective of the size. It was also observed that AgNP induced human neutrophil oxidative burst. Interestingly, some flavonoids, namely quercetin and quercetagetin, prevented the deleterious effects of AgNP in both cell types. Overall, the data of the present study provide a first insight into the promising protective role of flavonoids against the potentially toxic effects of AgNP at the intestinal level.


Antioxidants ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 10 (11) ◽  
pp. 1644
Author(s):  
Sawan Ali ◽  
Graziamaria Corbi ◽  
Michael Maes ◽  
Giovanni Scapagnini ◽  
Sergio Davinelli

Recent evidence suggests that diet modifies key biological factors associated with the development of depression. It has been suggested that this could be due to the high flavonoid content commonly found in many plant foods, beverages and dietary supplements. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review to evaluate the effects of dietary flavonoids on the symptoms of depression. A total of 46 studies met the eligibility criteria. Of these, 36 were intervention trials and 10 were observational studies. A meta-analysis of 36 clinical trials involving a total of 2788 participants was performed. The results showed a statistically significant effect of flavonoids on depressive symptoms (mean difference = −1.65; 95% C.I., −2.54, −0.77; p < 0.01). Five of the 10 observational studies included in the systematic review reported significant results, suggesting that a higher flavonoid intake may improve symptoms of depression. Further studies are urgently required to elucidate whether causal and mechanistic links exist, along with substantiation of functional brain changes associated with flavonoid consumption.


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