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2021 ◽  
Vol 8 ◽  
Author(s):  
Marta Wanat ◽  
Melanie Hoste ◽  
Nina Gobat ◽  
Marilena Anastasaki ◽  
Femke Böhmer ◽  
...  

Background: Minimising primary care professionals' (PCPs) risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection is crucial to ensure their safety as well as functioning health care system. PCPs' perspectives on the support they needed in the early stages of a public health crisis can inform future preparedness.Aim: To understand PCPs' experiences of providing care during the COVID-19 pandemic, with focus on personal risk from COVID-19 and testing.Design and Setting: Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with PCPs in England, Belgium, the Netherlands, Ireland, Germany, Poland, Greece and Sweden, between April and July 2020.Method: Interviews were analysed using a combination of inductive and deductive thematic analysis techniques.Results: Eighty interviews were conducted, showing that PCPs tried to make sense of their risk of both contracting and severity of COVID-19 by assessing individual risk factors and perceived effectiveness of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). They had limited access to PPE yet continued providing care as their “duty.” Some PCPs felt that they were put in high-risk situations when patients or colleagues were not flagging symptoms of COVID-19. Not having access to testing in the initial stages of the pandemic was somewhat accepted but when available, was valued.Conclusion: Access to adequate PPE and testing, as well as training for staff and education for patients about the importance of ensuring staff safety is crucial. Given PCPs' varied response in how they appraised personal risk and their tolerance for working, PCPs may benefit from the autonomy in deciding how they want to work during health emergencies.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Raquel Muñoz-Miralles ◽  
Anna Bonet-Esteve ◽  
Anna Rufas Cebollero ◽  
Xavier Pelegrin Cruz ◽  
Josep Vidal Alaball

Abstract BackgroundInfluenza vaccination is the main measure of prevention against the epidemic flu, which annually produces a significant increase in the pressure on healthcare systems, in addition to influencing the absenteeism of health workers. Although it is recommended that health professionals be vaccinated, their vaccination coverage is low. The lack of knowledge about the evolution of influenza in the context of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus pandemic led to the continued recommendation of influenza vaccination to people at risk and to professionals. The aim of the study is to determine the intention to vaccinate against seasonal flu of health professionals in the 2020-21 campaign in the context of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, and to analyse the factors that influence it.MethodsCross-sectional study through a structured online survey aimed at Primary Care professionals in the region of central Catalonia.ResultsA total of 610 participants responded to the survey, 65.7% of whom intended to be vaccinated against the flu in this campaign and 11.1% did not yet know or did not answer. The intention to be vaccinated against flu is associated with the professional category, the years of professional practice, the fact of making face-to-face guards, and the perception of the risk of suffering from flu. It is also related to a history of influenza vaccination in the previous year and to having been vaccinated on another occasion. The profile of professionals who intend to be vaccinated against flu includes professionals with a history of vaccination, who were on duty and perceived that their staff were at risk of becoming ill with flu.ConclusionsDuring the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, many professionals show a clear intention to get vaccinated against the flu, but there are still some who doubt it. In order to improve influenza vaccination coverage among health professionals, it is necessary to design strategies aimed at professionals who are hesitant or reluctant to vaccination.


2021 ◽  
Vol 11 (2) ◽  
pp. 5-9
Author(s):  
Jorge Gelvane Tostes ◽  
Carla Benedita da Silva Tostes ◽  
Rodrigo Petrim Cruz ◽  
Vanessa Santos de Souza ◽  
Maria das Graças Mota Cruz de Assis Figueiredo ◽  
...  

Telemedicine has proven to be an important tool for the assistance continuity facing the current COVID-19 pandemic. We discussed the role of tele-interconsultation and remote matrix support as resources, within the scope of the Unified Health System, in supporting primary care teams, aiming at maintaining quality and resolution, increasing demand for services, as well as the limitations to their implementation. There are difficulties in access by the population, the need for investment and resistance by professionals and managers. It is still necessary regulation of telemedicine activity in the country, given that the permission by the Federal Council of Medicine occured only during the pandemic. The ability to fill gaps and deficiencies left by specialized services and reference centers stands out, since there is an increase in demand in several areas. In addition, the opportunity for learning, safety in conduct and empowerment of primary care professionals is investigated.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Melissa B. Gilkey ◽  
Wei Yi Kong ◽  
Qian Huang ◽  
Brigid K. Grabert ◽  
Peyton Thompson ◽  
...  

BACKGROUND The Covid-19 pandemic has led to an unprecedented use of telehealth, including among primary care professionals (PCPs) who serve adolescents. OBJECTIVE To inform future practice and policies, we sought to characterize PCPs’ recent experience using adolescent telehealth, as well as their support for it after the pandemic is over. METHODS In February-March 2021, we conducted an online survey of 1,047 PCPs in the US. Our national sample included physicians (71%), advanced practice providers (17%), and nurses (12%) who provided primary care to adolescents, ages 11-17. RESULTS Most PCPs reported using telehealth for a low, moderate, or high proportion of their adolescent patients in the three months prior to the survey (41%, 27%, and 21%, respectively); only 11% reported no use. A majority agreed that adolescent telehealth increases access to care (69%) and is a way they can provide high quality care (53%). Few believed adolescent telehealth takes too much time (14%) or encourages healthcare overuse (15%). Most supported giving families the option of adolescent telehealth for primary care after the pandemic is over (65%) and believed that health insurance plans should continue to reimburse for telehealth visits (82%). About two-thirds (67%) wanted to offer adolescent telehealth visits after the pandemic, with intentions being higher among those with recent telehealth experience (P<.001). CONCLUSIONS PCPs in our national sample reported widespread use of and predominantly positive attitudes toward adolescent telehealth. Our findings also suggest broad support among PCPs for continuing to offer adolescent telehealth after the Covid-19 pandemic ends.


Author(s):  
Melissa B. Gilkey ◽  
Wei Yi Kong ◽  
Qian Huang ◽  
Brigid K. Grabert ◽  
Peyton Thompson ◽  
...  

Author(s):  
Kaitlyn E. Watson ◽  
Ross T. Tsuyuki ◽  
Nathan P. Beahm ◽  
Rebecca Sedore ◽  
Alan Bell

Background: The uptake of clinical practice guidelines into practice is limited for many chronic conditions, including hypertension. The aim of this study was to ascertain the importance of the educational competencies for the development of the Hypertension Canada Professional Certification Program (HC-PCP) among frontline, primary care professionals (e.g., pharmacists, physicians, nurses). Methods: A group of hypertension experts developed 15 competencies believed to be important for primary care professionals to master when providing hypertension management. These competencies were surveyed for consensus by frontline clinicians through the Hypertension Canada e-newsletter in 2018. Clinicians were asked to rank the importance of each competency for a primary care provider to acquire when undertaking a certification in hypertension management, using a Likert scale from 1 (not important) to 5 (very important). Results: A total of 121 clinicians responded to the survey. Of these, 38% were pharmacists, 31.4% were registered nurses, 10.7% were physicians and 7% were nurse practitioners. There was at least 1 respondent from each Canadian province and territory, except for the Northwest Territories. All 15 competencies received a mean rank of at least 4. The competency with the highest ranking was Competency 6: Ability to screen and identify hypertension (mean 4.83 [0.04]). The competencies with the lowest average ranks were Competency 1: Demonstrates a sound knowledge of the epidemiology of hypertension (mean 4.07 [0.85]) and Competency 5: Demonstrates an understanding of the validation process for blood pressure devices (mean 4.15 [0.08]). Conclusions: Clinicians generally ranked all 15 competencies to be of high importance for a provider who is certified in hypertension management to possess. These competencies and the current Hypertension Canada guidelines were used as the foundation for the development of an education program called the Hypertension Canada Professional Certification Program. Can Pharm J (Ott) 2021;154:xx-xx.


BMJ Open ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 11 (6) ◽  
pp. e045657
Author(s):  
Maria Hanf ◽  
Julian Hirt ◽  
Marjan van den Akker

IntroductionMental disorders such as depression are common, and an estimated 264 million people are affected by them throughout the world. In recent years, studies on digital health interventions to treat mental disorders have shown evidence of their efficacy, and interest in using them has increased as a result. In the primary care setting, depression and anxiety are the two most frequently diagnosed and treated mental disorders. When they do not refer them to specialists, primary care professionals such as general practitioners treat patients with mental disorders themselves but have insufficient time to treat them adequately. Furthermore, there is a shortage of psychotherapists and those that exist have long waiting lists for an appointment. The purpose of this mixed methods systematic review is to explore the attitudes of primary care professionals towards the use of digital health interventions in the treatment of patients with mental disorders. Their attitudes will provide an indication whether digital mental health interventions can effectively complement standard care in the primary care setting.Methods and analysisWe searched for qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods studies published in English, German, Spanish, Russian, French and Dutch after January 2010 for inclusion in the review. The included studies must involve digital mental health interventions conducted via computer and/or mobile devices in the primary care setting. The search was conducted in July 2020 in the following electronic bibliographic databases: MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Science Core Collection. Two reviewers will independently screen titles, abstracts and full texts and extract data. We will use the ‘Integrated methodology’ framework to combine both quantitative and qualitative data.Ethics and disseminationEthical approval is not required. We will disseminate the results of the mixed methods systematic review in a peer-reviewed journal and scientific conferences.PROSPERO registration numberCRD42020188879.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Rocío Zamanillo-Campos ◽  
Maria Jesús Serrano-Ripoll ◽  
Joana Maria Taltavull-Aparicio ◽  
Elena Gervilla-García ◽  
Joana Ripoll-Amengual ◽  
...  

BACKGROUND Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a long-term condition affecting 9.3% of people worldwide. People with T2D are at high risk of developing serious complications (e.g., blindness, lower-limb amputations, kidney disease, cardiovascular disease), which reduce their quality of life and life expectancy. Antidiabetic medication, if taken appropriately, is effective in preventing diabetes-related complications. However, 40% of T2D patients do not adequately adhere to their medication regimes. Brief text messages (e.g., SMS) delivered at a wide-scale and low cost via digital health systems represent a promising approach to support medication adherence. However, the views and perspectives of primary care professionals (PCP) regarding this type of intervention have seldom been explored. OBJECTIVE To explore PCPs’ views and perspectives concerning the DiabeText intervention, a new text messaging intervention currently being developed to support medication adherence in people with T2D in Mallorca (Spain). METHODS In this qualitative study, we conducted four focus groups (n=28) and eight semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of primary care doctors and nurses with previous experience in the provision of healthcare to patients with T2D. Data collection explored the acceptability and usefulness of the DiabeText intervention and the barriers and facilitators to its development and implementation. Data analysis was carried out by researchers independently and discussed in a series of six meetings and a workshop. All data were coded by the lead author following an iterative approach. Initial notes were made, followed by a process of categorization and theme development following Braun and Clark’s methodology. RESULTS Three main themes were identified: 1) text messaging interventions have the potential to effectively support diabetes self-management (DSM); 2) Involving PCP in the intervention would facilitate its design and implementation, and; 3) obtaining evidence supporting the cost-effectiveness is a key prerequisite for large scale implementation of the intervention. PCPs drew on their knowledge and experience treating T2D patients to identify facilitators and barriers for the design and implementation of the intervention. They also made suggestions about the content and format of the text messages. PCPs identified additional areas (diet, exercise, diabetes complications, appointment reminders) that the messaging intervention should address to further support adequate DSM. CONCLUSIONS The DiabeText intervention is perceived as useful and acceptable by PCPs provided its cost-effectiveness. Involving PCPs in the design and implementation of the intervention is a key factor to optimize the potential impact of the proposed intervention.


Author(s):  
Francesc Saigí-Rubió ◽  
Josep Vidal-Alaball ◽  
Joan Torrent-Sellens ◽  
Ana Jiménez-Zarco ◽  
Francesc López Segui ◽  
...  

2021 ◽  
Vol 32 (3) ◽  
pp. 122-123
Author(s):  
Karen Storey

Karen Storey provides an overview of CARE, a programme that empowers GPNs and other primary care professionals to play a key role in their PCNs


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