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2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Manon AMANDIO ◽  
◽  
Sébastien WIT ◽  

The 19th century is inhabited by the demon of the game. Games were the subject of press articles and technical works (treatises, reviews, manuals) were dedicated to them. Literature was not left out either, whether in France or in the rest of Europe. In this article, we propose to make our contribution to the sociopoetic analysis of the game and the toy through the study of the specific case of the literary representation of the card game in two short stories: "La Dame de pique" ("Пиковая дама", 1834) by Alexander Pushkin, and "Le Dessous de cartes d’une partie de whist" (1850) by Jules Barbey d’Aurevilly. Apart from their generic affiliation and their link with the world of playing cards (explicit from the title), the two short stories are similar in terms of the core of their plot (a murder against the background of a card game) but also in terms of the supernatural features that are scattered throughout them.


2021 ◽  
Vol 1 (2) ◽  
pp. 13-14
Author(s):  
Foued Sabbagh ◽  

The people of the world have entered a decade phase after bidding farewell to the previous year 2019 and to begin with stability towards a future that is looming on the horizon of many variables that could shape the characteristics of the next decade with the start year of 2020, it will therefore constitute a fundamental change for the future of daily life and the international economy.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Anne Gershon

A live attenuated vaccine against varicella (later also used to prevent zoster) was developed in 1974 by Takahashi and colleagues. Varicella vaccine was licensed for universal immunization of healthy children in the United States in 1995. It is also now used for this purpose in at least 15 additional countries all over the world. Varicella is disappearing in the US. Varicella vaccine has proven extremely safe and side effects are unusual, mild, and less serious than varicella or its complications. 85% of children are protected completely after 1 dose; the 15% who develop varicella despite immunization usually (but not always) have mild infections. These 15%, however, can transmit the wild type virus to others. Therefore, for optimal effect, 2 doses are required, mostly to address children who did not have an optimal primary immune response after the first dose. Waning immunity does not seem to pose a serious problem, but surveillance of vaccinees is continuing. It was demonstrated in 2005 that at a high dose of vaccine – 15 times higher than that used for prevention of varicella in children - zoster in adults can also be safely prevented. The live attenuated zoster vaccine is effective in approximately 50% of healthy individuals over age 60 who have had varicella in the past, and therefore have latent infection with varicella-zoster virus. It is given as one dose, but its effect runs out about 8 years after vaccination. In 2017, a new vaccine against zoster was also introduced. This is a subunit vaccine which does not contain contagious virus. It is even more effective than the older zoster vaccine and is over 95% effective in adults 50–≥70 years of age in preventing zoster and post herpetic neuralgia.


2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Stephen Burke

Purpose This paper aims to highlight lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic for planning for the future of our ageing society. It looks at trends, changes in our society and implications for people of all ages. It focusses on the importance of planning and whether COVID-19 will lead to long-term changes. Design/methodology/approach This paper draws on the author’s experiences running an intergenerational organisation during the pandemic and other work associated with ageing well. Findings This paper highlights some of the risks and unknowns we face going forwards and points to lessons and opportunities for “building back better”. Research limitations/implications This paper is based on a review of published articles and viewpoints. Practical implications The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged people of all ages in different ways, some of which have tested intergenerational solidarity. At the same time, the pandemic has raised issues which we must all address going forward: planning for future pandemics, planning for an ageing society and ensuring that future planning works for all generations. This paper explores all these themes in the light of lessons from COVID-19. Firstly, despite much risk assessment and scenario planning, we were not well placed in the UK or across the world to respond to the multiple challenges of COVID-19. Have we learned the lessons to be able to deal better with the inevitable pandemics that will follow in the future? It is also well documented that the pandemic has exacerbated existing inequalities in our society. What will the long-term impact be for longevity and will less healthy lives reverse the trend of increasing life expectancy? Secondly, what are the lessons for our ageing society? As life expectancy rises, what will the quality of life be like in those added years? Many of today’s babies can expect to have a 100-year life. What does that mean for the way we lead our lives and can we ensure that everyone can age well? Third, these are not just issues for older people, but for people of all ages and generations. The Covid-19 experience has been different for younger and older people – whether it has been health or job security, income, taxation or housing. Questions of intergenerational fairness have again raised their heads, alongside the longer term impact for future generations. Social implications Firstly, despite much risk assessment and scenario planning, we were not well placed in the UK or across the world to respond to the multiple challenges of COVID-19. Have we learned the lessons to be able to deal better with the inevitable pandemics that will follow in the future? It is also well documented that the pandemic has exacerbated existing inequalities in our society. What will the long-term impact be for longevity and will less healthy lives reverse the trend of increasing life expectancy? Secondly, what are the lessons for our ageing society? As life expectancy rises, what will the quality of life be like in those added years? Many of today’s babies can expect to have a 100-year life. What does that mean for the way we lead our lives and can we ensure that everyone can age well? Thirdly, these are not just issues for older people, but for people of all ages and generations. Measures that bring older and younger people together and encourage meaningful mixing will help increase understanding and awareness between generations. This has huge implications for our society and communities. Originality/value This paper reaches two main conclusions. Firstly, the well-known saying: “failing to plan is planning to fail”. This applies to all the issues discussed in this paper re future pandemics, our ageing society and future generations. Secondly, the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic should be the catalyst for changing the way we live and lead to new beginnings. We cannot just carry on as before.


Author(s):  
Abhijeet Ingle

Abstract: Correspondence is an ability which includes precise and constant interaction of talking, tuning in and understanding. A great many people are brought into the world with the actual capacity to talk, however we should figure out how to talk well and impart successfully. Talking, tuning in and our capacity to comprehend verbal and non-verbal signs are the abilities by perceptions others and demonstrating our conduct on what we see and saw. We are additionally shown some relational abilities straightforwardly through schooling. By bringing those abilities into training and getting them assessed. English correspondence is an expertise that can be consummated distinctly through steady practice and constant openness to the objective language the accessible assets ought to be totally tapped in order to give and urging environment to learning and rehearsing the language. This paper manages the Role of English to Enrich the Effective Communication abilities. English correspondence with current strategies encourages to cultivate an inspirational mentality. English interchanges which would make conceivable to address the impending difficulties of the day in an imaginative manner. Keywords: Effective Communication, Listening, Speaking, Academics, Integration


Author(s):  
Rajeev Kumar Gupta ◽  
Nilesh Kunhare ◽  
Rajesh Kumar Pateriya ◽  
Nikhlesh Pathik

The novel Covid-19 is one of the leading cause of death worldwide in the year 2020 and declared as a pandemic by world health organization (WHO). This virus affecting all countries across the world and 5 lakh people die as of June 2020 due to Covid-19. Due to the highly contagious nature, early detection of this virus plays a vital role to break Covid chain. Recent studies done by China says that chest CT and X-Ray image may be used as a preliminary test for Covid detection. Deep learning-based CNN model can use to detect Coronavirus automatically from the chest X-rays images. This paper proposed a transfer learning-based approach to detect Covid disease. Due to the less number of Covid chest images, we are using a pre-trained model to classify X-ray images into Covid and Normal class. This paper presents the comparative study of a various pre-trained model like VGGNet-19, ResNet50 and Inception_ResNet_V2. Experiment results show that Inception_ResNet_V2 gives the better result as compare to VGGNet and ResNet model with training and test accuracy of 99.26 and 94, respectively.


2021 ◽  
Vol 27 (3) ◽  
pp. 161-164
Author(s):  
Tatyana N. Shmeleva

The article deals with the typological parallels between Kate Chopin’s literary-artistic system and philosophical doctrine of transcendentalism. As well as the majority of the writers of that time Kate Chopin could not avoid the influence of the ideas determining the peculiarities of cultural atmosphere in America, Ralf Waldo Emerson’s ideas in particular. Emerson’s philosophical and aesthetic conception proclaimed individual freedom the highest value, pointed out the intuitive nature of creative work. American transcendentalism encouraged to depict even mundane life events, empowered the art with a special role in the discovery of the world. These provisions were especially close to Kate Chopin and were rather peculiarly embodied in her works. Thus, Kate Chopin depicted mundane events from American life in all their diversity. In her works art is a way to penetrate into the deepest core of existence. The cross-cutting theme of Kate Chopin’s writing was her heroines’ understanding of their own significance, the necessity of freedom and self-realisation and that coincides greatly with Emerson’s “self-reliance” doctrine. Nevertheless, transcendentalism ideas being a part of cultural code of the time combined in Kate Chopin’s works with her individual worldview and that reflected in special ironic implication of her prose.


2021 ◽  
Vol 27 (3) ◽  
pp. 122-127
Author(s):  
Anastasia A. Alekseeva

This article is devoted to the characterisation of the main signs of integration, observed in “Prison Songsˮ by Sergey Gorodetsky, the presence of which testifies to the cyclical structure of the work. The work provides a detailed analysis of the core themes of the cycle, central motifs and images. The author points out that the leading role in the formation of the principle of textual construction of artistic unity is played by antithesis, through the use of which the development of the position of the lyrical hero is most clearly traced, which becomes identical with the position of the author himself. The article concludes that the poems that make up the structure of “Prison Songsˮ do reveal common artistic bonds that support the cyclical nature of the work, as well as maintain strong artistic ties with the entire structure of the collection “Unbound Freedomˮ. These include both a common title, a single lyrical hero, close to the very figure of the author, common motifs and images, and genre characteristics of individual poems of the cycle. In addition, conceptual meanings for understanding the work as a whole are born at their junctions rather than within individual poems, which makes it possible to get closer to comprehending the author's picture of the world, embodied by the poet in the text of the cycle.


2021 ◽  
Vol 27 (3) ◽  
pp. 135-147
Author(s):  
Elena M. Bondarchuk

This article examines one of the symbolic components of the «objective world» of the novel about the writer – the image of the «book». It is noted that its use in the poetics of «Doctor Zhivago» is multifunctional. In addition to the characteristics of the artistic space, the «book» acts as a «finished object» that implements «universal and all-encompassing semantic segments» in the plot associated with cultural memory, the integrity of life and the world order. Special attention is paid to the content of the genre designation of «final book», which is applied to a number of «polymorphic» novels of the late 19th – 20th centuries and is considered in the context of «genre generalisations» in literature. The meaning of lexical components used within this genre designation is clarified. The occasional meaning «target», contained in the word «final», allows one to see in the intense self-reflection of the writer, which has a significant impact on the creative process, aspiration to cognise the «hidden essence» of things. The appeal to the goals inherent in the «ontological construction» of beings is defined in the philosophical tradition as «phenomenological reduction» (EGA Husserl), «transcending the spirit beyond its limits» (RM Garrigou-Lagrange). These processes are responsible for the retardation of the phase of the formation of the concept of the work – a phenomenon that has not yet been fully explained.


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