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2022 ◽  
Vol 63 ◽  
pp. 20-27
Author(s):  
Pamela J. Gampetro ◽  
John P. Segvich ◽  
Ashley M. Hughes ◽  
Chris Kanich ◽  
Judith M. Schlaeger ◽  
...  

2022 ◽  
Vol 22 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-20
Author(s):  
Anna Stepanova ◽  
Alexis Weaver ◽  
Joanna Lahey ◽  
Gerianne Alexander ◽  
Tracy Hammond

Computer science ( CS ) majors are in high demand and account for a large part of national computer and information technology job market applicants. Employment in this sector is projected to grow 12% between 2018 and 2028, which is faster than the average of all other occupations. Published data are available on traditional non-computer science-specific hiring processes. However, the hiring process for CS majors may be different. It is critical to have up-to-date information on questions such as “what positions are in high demand for CS majors?,” “what is a typical hiring process?,” and “what do employers say they look for when hiring CS graduates?” This article discusses the analysis of a survey of 218 recruiters hiring CS graduates in the United States. We used Atlas.ti to analyze qualitative survey data and report the results on what positions are in the highest demand, the hiring process, and the resume review process. Our study revealed that a software developer was the most common job the recruiters were looking to fill. We found that the hiring process steps for CS graduates are generally aligned with traditional hiring steps, with an additional emphasis on technical and coding tests. Recruiters reported that their hiring choices were based on reviewing resume’s experience, GPA, and projects sections. The results provide insights into the hiring process, decision making, resume analysis, and some discrepancies between current undergraduate CS program outcomes and employers’ expectations.


2022 ◽  
Vol 85 ◽  
pp. 102396
Author(s):  
Kristin Floress ◽  
Rachael Shwom ◽  
Holly Caggiano ◽  
Jacob Slattery ◽  
Cara Cuite ◽  
...  

2022 ◽  
Vol 6 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-12
Author(s):  
P. J. Moore-Jones

Chinese students studying in the United States face great challenges when adapting to cultural, linguistic, and pedagogical differences. Although discouraged in the literature, self-segregation is a practice common among some international students and is especially prevalent in the Chinese community. This qualitative study explored the motivation and frequency of this practice vis-à-vis social support, and its effect on the participants’ sense of belonging. Insider status was employed to conduct focus groups of mainland Chinese students currently enrolled in graduate programs at a Mid-Atlantic University in the United States. Findings from the study explore how administrators, educators, and the students themselves view the practice of self-segregation and its consequences.


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