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2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Ho-Chun Herbert Chang ◽  
Allissa Richardson ◽  
Emilio Ferrara

We present and analyze 1.13 million public Instagram posts during the Black Lives Matter protests of 2020, which erupted in response to George Floyd’s public murder by police on May 25. Our aim is to understand the growing role of visual media, through a comprehensive view of the spatial (where) and temporal (when) dynamics, the visual and textual content (what), and the user communities (who) that drove the social movement. Using network and time-series analysis, results reveal New York, California, and Minnesota evolved as the epicenters of online social interaction. Our results also make two theoretical contributions. Social movements traditionally typologize posts as discrete instances of mobilization, organization, or conversation. The semantic analysis of 1.69 million photos show these functions are folded together visually. Second, we discuss how pre-existing meme groups and international organizations stood in solidarity to critically assist information dissemination. Together, these analyses demonstrate the precarious nature of protest journalism, and how international content creators, journalists, and everyday users co-evolved with social media to report on one of America’s largest-ever human rights movements.


2022 ◽  
Vol 10 (1) ◽  
pp. 131-134
Author(s):  
Rachel Haworth
Keyword(s):  
New York ◽  

Review of: Fame amid the Ruins: Italian Film Stardom in the Age of Neorealism, Stephen Gundle (2020) New York: Berghahn, 370 pp., ISBN 978-1-78920-001-0, h/bk, £110.00


2022 ◽  
Vol 10 (1) ◽  
pp. 126-130
Author(s):  
Allison Cooper
Keyword(s):  
New York ◽  

Review of: The Cinema of Paolo Sorrentino: Commitment to Style, Russell J. A. Kilbourn (2020) New York: Columbia University Press, 231 pp., ISBN 978-0-23118-993-4, p/bk, $30.00


2021 ◽  
Vol 70 (37) ◽  
pp. 1306-1311
Author(s):  
Eli S. Rosenberg ◽  
David R. Holtgrave ◽  
Vajeera Dorabawila ◽  
MaryBeth Conroy ◽  
Danielle Greene ◽  
...  
Keyword(s):  
New York ◽  

Author(s):  
Qian Ye ◽  
Kaan Ozbay ◽  
Fan Zuo ◽  
Xiaohong Chen

During the outbreak of COVID-19, people’s reliance on social media for pandemic-related information exchange, daily communications, and online professional interactions increased because of self-isolation and lockdown implementation. Most of the published research addresses the performance of nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) and measures on the issues impacted by COVID-19, such as health, education, and public safety; however, not much is known about the interplay between social media use and travel behaviors. This study aims to determine the effect of social media on human mobility before and after the COVID-19 outbreak, and its impact on personal vehicle and public transit use in New York City (NYC). Apple mobility trends and Twitter data are used as two data sources. The results indicate that Twitter volume and mobility trend correlations are negative for both driving and transit categories in general, especially at the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak in NYC. A significant time lag (13 days) between the online communication rise and mobility drop can be observed, thereby providing evidence of social networks taking quicker reactions to the pandemic than the transportation system. In addition, social media and government policies had different impacts on vehicular traffic and public transit ridership during the pandemic with varied performance. This study provides insights on the complex influence of both anti-pandemic measures and user-generated content, namely social media, on people’s travel decisions during pandemics. The empirical evidence can help decision-makers formulate timely emergency responses, prepare targeted traffic intervention policies, and conduct risk management in similar outbreaks in the future.


2021 ◽  
pp. e1-e4
Author(s):  
Thomas E. Smith ◽  
Ian T. Rodgers ◽  
Daniel J. Silverman ◽  
Sally R. Dreslin ◽  
Mark Olfson ◽  
...  

Individuals with serious mental illness are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19. The New York State (NYS) Office of Mental Health implemented patient and staff rapid testing, quarantining, and vaccination to limit COVID-19 spread in 23 state-operated psychiatric hospitals between November 2020 and February 2021. COVID-19 infection rates in inpatients and staff decreased by 96% and 71%, respectively, and the NYS population case rate decreased by 6%. Repeated COVID-19 testing and vaccination should be priority interventions for state-operated psychiatric hospitals. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print September 16, 2021:e1–e4. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306444 )


Author(s):  
J. Robin Moon ◽  
Craig Willingham ◽  
Shqipe Gjevukaj ◽  
Nicholas Freudenberg

New York City was hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the immediate health burden was devastating, we posit that its long-term impact will be even greater, because the rapid spread of COVID-19 both depended on and exacerbated other deep-seated inequities related to food and broader living conditions. Using the Bronx as a case study, we explore the intersection of the pandemic with two other persistent problems: food insecurity and diet-related diseases, a constellation we label the COVID-Food Syndemic. Syndemic theory focuses on the common causes and biological and social interactions between two or more health problems. We hypothesize that with its focus on the common social causes of ill health, this approach can inform and strengthen the synergies between community-based, activist-driven solutions and municipal government responses, thus reducing the burden of ill health in the Bronx. We suggest that combining these two approaches can more fully mobilize the social changes that are needed in the food system and beyond to interrupt the fundamental drivers of this syndemic and capitalize on the respective strengths of government, civil society, and activists.


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