Indian Gaming Zones as Oppositional Subculture

2021 ◽  
pp. 000-000
Author(s):  
Jeffrey G. Snodgrass ◽  
H. J. François Dengah ◽  
Chakrapani Upadhyay ◽  
Robert J. Else ◽  
Evan Polzer
Keyword(s):  
Elements ◽  
2009 ◽  
Vol 5 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Tim Mooney

Federalism has played an important role in the explosion of legalized gambling in the United States in the last two decades. Indian gaming, in particular, has challenged state and national governments to come to terms with the place of American Indian tribes within the federalist system and organize a meaningful framework for the expansion of gaming on tribal lands. Now largely controlled by a federal statutory framework, Indian gaming has left states in a subordinate position in negotiating the establisment of major casino enterprises within their own borders. Confusion in states' rights during negotiations has further weakened their bargaining position, leading to extensive tribal casino development. The cooperation between states and tribes and states and casino corporations have facilitated casino proliferation throughout the United States, a trend that appears destined to contiue until the market is fully saturated.


2021 ◽  
pp. 0160323X2110579
Author(s):  
Thaddieus W. Conner ◽  
Aimee L. Franklin ◽  
Christian Martinez

Intergovernmental relations scholars note a decentralizing trend transferring authority from national to state and local government in the American federalist system. Theory suggests that a misalignment of the interests of national and regional actors may lead to variation in sub-national regulatory environments. We investigate how different sub-national regulatory environments condition the impact of Tribal gaming. Using tribal-state gaming compacts and amendments from 1990–2010, we examine how restrictions in sub-national regulatory agreements condition intended impacts of the 1988 Indian Gaming Regulatory Act. We find that revenue sharing and market restrictions differentially influence the impact of gaming on tribal per capita income but not levels of unemployment. Through the case of Tribal gaming, we determine how sub-national agreements condition the relative accomplishment of policy goals important to Native nations.


2019 ◽  
Vol 100 (3) ◽  
pp. 793-807
Author(s):  
Thaddieus W. Conner ◽  
Aimee L. Franklin
Keyword(s):  

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