Mental Health Services
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2021 ◽  
pp. 103985622110479
Author(s):  
Sven K Delaney ◽  
Stephen Allison ◽  
Jeffrey CL Looi ◽  
Niranjan Bidargaddi ◽  
Tarun Bastiampillai

Objective: Australian youth mental health services have received significant funding over the past 15 years. We analysed data on hospitalisation due to intentional self-harm to determine whether increased youth services were associated with reduction in a key indicator of youth population mental health. Method: Trends in national self-harm hospitalisation data from 2008 to 2019 for youth (<25 years) and adults (>25 years) were analysed using joinpoint regression. Results: Rates of hospitalisation due to intentional self-harm increased significantly in both male (1.1% per annum, 95% CI [0.2%, 1.9%]) and female (3.0% per annum, 95% CI [0.9%, 5.1%]) youth aged <25 years between 2008 and 2019. Female youth had higher rates of hospitalisation than males, and there were average annual increases of 9.1% (95% CI [2.4%, 16.3%]) and 4.0% (95% CI [0.1%, 7.9%]), and absolute increases of 120% and 47.9%, in the rate of hospitalisation of females aged 0–14 and 15–19, respectively. In contrast, there was no overall change in adults (>25 years). Conclusions: Rates of hospitalisation due to intentional self-harm in Australian youth have increased despite significant investment in youth mental health services. This result could be attributable to several sociocultural factors and suggests a critical need for more hospital-based emergency youth mental health services.


2021 ◽  
pp. 103985622110528
Author(s):  
Jeffrey C.L. Looi ◽  
Stephen Allison ◽  
Tarun Bastiampillai ◽  
Stephen R. Kisely

Objective: We describe an independent model of clinical academic mental health services research that is able to provide synthesised views for medico-political organisations that are engaged in advocacy for national and state evidence-based policy and planning of mental healthcare. Conclusions: CAPIPRA focuses on independent research and policy analysis using publicly available datasets on population mental health at national and state/territory levels, published in international and national peer-reviewed journals (>50 papers since 2019). We partner with medico-political organisations in evidence-based advocacy across a wide range of issues.


Autism ◽  
2021 ◽  
pp. 136236132110579
Author(s):  
Silke Lipinski ◽  
Katharina Boegl ◽  
Elisabeth S Blanke ◽  
Ulrike Suenkel ◽  
Isabel Dziobek

Most adults on the autism spectrum have co-occurring mental health conditions, creating a high demand for mental health services – including psychotherapy – in autistic adults. However, autistic adults have difficulties accessing mental health services. The most-reported barriers to accessing treatment are therapists’ lack of knowledge and expertise surrounding autism, as well as unwillingness to treat autistic individuals. This study was conducted by a participatory autism research group and examined 498 adult-patient psychotherapists on knowledge about autism and self-perceived competency to diagnose and treat autistic patients without intellectual disability compared to patients with other diagnoses. Psychotherapists rated their education about autism in formal training, and competency in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with autism, lowest compared to patients with all other diagnoses surveyed in the study, including those with comparable prevalence rates. Many therapists had misconceptions and outdated beliefs about autism. Few had completed additional training on autism, but the majority were interested in receiving it. Greater knowledge about autism was positively linked to openness to accept autistic patients. The results point to an alarming gap in knowledge necessary for adequate mental health care for individuals with autism. Lay abstract Most autistic adults experience mental health problems. There is a great demand for psychotherapeutic support that addresses the specific needs of autistic individuals. However, people with autism encounter difficulties trying to access diagnostic and therapeutic services. This study was conducted by a participatory autism research group: a group in which autistic individuals and scientists collaborate. The group developed a questionnaire for psychotherapists in Germany to assess their knowledge about autism. Psychotherapists also rated their ability to diagnose and treat autistic patients without intellectual disability, and patients with other psychological diagnoses. Many of the 498 psychotherapists that responded reported little knowledge and outdated beliefs about autism, as well as little training on treating patients with autism. Their expertise about other psychological conditions was more comprehensive. However, many psychotherapists were interested in professional training on autism. Those with more knowledge were also more open to treating autistic patients. In conclusion, psychotherapists’ lack of knowledge and expertise seem to be a major barrier for adults with autism to receiving helpful psychotherapeutic support. The results demonstrate the need for an advancement in autism education during psychotherapists’ training and in continuous education.


Healthcare ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 9 (12) ◽  
pp. 1613
Author(s):  
Alan B. McGuire ◽  
Mindy E. Flanagan ◽  
Marina Kukla ◽  
Angela L. Rollins ◽  
Laura J. Myers ◽  
...  

Prior studies have demonstrated disruption to outpatient mental health services after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Inpatient mental health services have received less attention. The current study utilized an existing cohort of 33 Veterans Health Affairs (VHA) acute inpatient mental health units to examine disruptions to inpatient services. It further explored the association between patient demographic, clinical, and services variables on relapse rates. Inpatient admissions and therapeutic services (group and individual therapy and peer support) were lower amongst the COVID-19 sample than prior to the onset of COVID-19 while lengths of stay were longer. Relapse rates did not differ between cohorts. Patients with prior emergent services use as well as substance abuse or personality disorder diagnoses were at higher risk for relapse. Receiving group therapy while admitted was associated with lower risk of relapse. Inpatient mental health services saw substantial disruptions across the cohort. Inpatient mental health services, including group therapy, may be an important tool to prevent subsequent relapse.


2021 ◽  
pp. 124-126
Author(s):  
Aloisio Antonio Gomes de Matos ◽  
Séphora Natércia Albuquerque Oliveira ◽  
Modesto Leite Rolim Neto

Background: The FDA has been requiring that information about using remdesivir to treat COVID-19 be made available to healthcare providers and patients, including dosing instructions, potential side effects, and drug interactions. It is important to observe the initial indicators of anxiety, fear, and euphoria for families during emergencies, including information on the possible side effects. This situational context is very important in all the world, because it opens doors for providing the use of updated information about treatment follow-up and for offering improved mental health services. Method: The studies were identified in well-known international journals found in two electronic databases: Scopus and Embase. The data were cross-checked with information from the main international newspapers. Results: The high expectations supported by an immediate discourse culminate in frustration and displeasure, while more consistent empirical results are not generated. These two are predictors of psychic suffering, especially due to the scarcity of information and uncertainties. In parallel, recent studies indicate that spreading information without scientific basis intensifies damage to the routine and health of people, which are already impacted by the pandemic situation. This misrepresented spread may be a factor for unleashing fear and, as a consequence, social despair. Conclusions: Based on the impulsive scenarios stimulated in the context of hydroxychloroquine and on the high spread of fake or distorted news, the psychiatric impacts of COVID-19 pandemic associated with the use of remdesivir may be worsened and reflected directly on the population’s self-esteem.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Darren Mills

<p>Recovery is a conceptual model that underpins New Zealand’s mental health service delivery in the 21st century. This thesis explores how recovery emerged historically as an influential philosophy and how representations of recovery have changed to meet the needs of different groups. An inquiry, based on Foucault’s genealogical method, investigates the historical and contemporary forces of power that have shaped the construction of mental illness, and the development of methods and techniques to support and manage persons labelled as mentally ill. The normalisation of knowledge developed during 19th century psychiatric practice provided a context for later critique and resistance from movements that highlighted the oppressive power of psychiatric discourse. Key to the critique were the antipsychiatry and service user movements, which provided the conditions for the possibility of the emergence of recovery as a dominant discourse. Since its emergence, recovery has moved through a number of representations as it was taken up by different groups. A significant shift in the 21st century has been the dominance of neo-liberal discourse based on consumerism, a rolling back of the state, and an emphasis on individual responsibility. The implications of this shift for users and providers of services and their effects on current representations of recovery conclude the inquiry.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Darren Mills

<p>Recovery is a conceptual model that underpins New Zealand’s mental health service delivery in the 21st century. This thesis explores how recovery emerged historically as an influential philosophy and how representations of recovery have changed to meet the needs of different groups. An inquiry, based on Foucault’s genealogical method, investigates the historical and contemporary forces of power that have shaped the construction of mental illness, and the development of methods and techniques to support and manage persons labelled as mentally ill. The normalisation of knowledge developed during 19th century psychiatric practice provided a context for later critique and resistance from movements that highlighted the oppressive power of psychiatric discourse. Key to the critique were the antipsychiatry and service user movements, which provided the conditions for the possibility of the emergence of recovery as a dominant discourse. Since its emergence, recovery has moved through a number of representations as it was taken up by different groups. A significant shift in the 21st century has been the dominance of neo-liberal discourse based on consumerism, a rolling back of the state, and an emphasis on individual responsibility. The implications of this shift for users and providers of services and their effects on current representations of recovery conclude the inquiry.</p>


Author(s):  
Johannes Rossouw ◽  
Eleanor Carey ◽  
Elizabeth Doyle ◽  
Gillian O'Brien ◽  
Sarah Cullinan ◽  
...  

2021 ◽  
pp. 070674372110554
Author(s):  
Patricia Boksa ◽  
Daphne Hutt-MacLeod ◽  
Lacey Clair ◽  
Gregory Brass ◽  
Shirley Bighead ◽  
...  

Objective In many Indigenous communities, youth mental health services are inadequate. Six Indigenous communities participating in the ACCESS Open Minds (AOM) network implemented strategies to transform their youth mental health services. This report documents the demographic and clinical presentations of youth accessing AOM services at these Indigenous sites. Methods Four First Nations and two Inuit communities contributed to this study. Youth presenting for mental health services responded to a customized sociodemographic questionnaire and presenting concerns checklist, and scales assessing distress, self-rated health and mental health, and suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Results Combined data from the First Nations sites indicated that youth across the range of 11–29 years accessed services. More girls/women than boys/men accessed services; 17% identified as LBGTQ+. Most (83%) youth indicated having access to at least one reliable adult and getting along well with the people living with them. Twenty-five percent of youth reported difficulty meeting basic expenses. Kessler (K10) distress scores indicated that half likely had a moderate mental health problem and a fourth had severe problems. Fifty-five percent of youth rated their mental health as fair or poor, while 50% reported suicidal thoughts in the last month. Anxiety, stress, depression and sleep issues were the most common presenting problems. Fifty-one percent of youth either accessed services themselves or were referred by family members. AOM was the first mental health service accessed that year for 68% of youth. Conclusions This report is the first to present a demographic and clinical portrait of youth presenting at mental health services in multiple Indigenous settings in Canada. It illustrates the acceptability and feasibility of transforming youth mental health services using core principles tailored to meet communities’ unique needs, resources, and cultures, and evaluating these using a common protocol. Data obtained can be valuable in evaluating services and guiding future service design. Trial registration name and number at Clinicaltrials.gov: ACCESS Open Minds/ACCESS Esprits ouverts, ISRCTN23349893


Author(s):  
Charlotte Finnigan ◽  
Jason Brown ◽  
Mohamed Al-Adeimi ◽  
Rajaa Al-Abed

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