Cardiac Arrest
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Heart Rhythm ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 18 (8) ◽  
pp. S262-S263
Author(s):  
Audrey Uy-Evanado ◽  
Harpriya Chugh ◽  
Faye L. Norby ◽  
Chad Sorenson ◽  
Jonathan Jui ◽  
...  

Heart Rhythm ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 18 (8) ◽  
pp. S101
Author(s):  
Benjamin Helm ◽  
Katie Agre ◽  
Susan Christian ◽  
Christine Keywan ◽  
Kirsten L. Bartels

Heart Rhythm ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 18 (8) ◽  
pp. S86
Author(s):  
Harpriya Chugh ◽  
Arayik Sargsyan ◽  
Kotoka Nakamura ◽  
Damon Klebe ◽  
Audrey Uy-Evanado ◽  
...  

2021 ◽  
Vol 78 (2) ◽  
pp. 314-316
Author(s):  
Aditya C. Shekhar ◽  
Christopher Mercer ◽  
Robert Ball ◽  
Ira Blumen

2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Makoto Watanabe ◽  
Tasuku Matsuyama ◽  
Hikaru Oe ◽  
Makoto Sasaki ◽  
Yuki Nakamura ◽  
...  

Abstract Background: Little is known about the effectiveness of surface cooling (SC) and endovascular cooling (EC) on the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients receiving target temperature management (TTM) according to their initial rhythm.Methods: We retrospectively analysed data from the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine Out‐of‐Hospital Cardiac Arrest registry, a multicentre, prospective nationwide database in Japan. For our analysis, OHCA patients aged ≥ 18 years who were treated with TTM between June 2014 and December 2017 were included. The primary outcome was 30-day survival with favourable neurological outcome defined as a Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance category score of 1 or 2. Cooling methods were divided into the following groups: SC (ice packs, fans, air blankets, and surface gel pads) and EC (endovascular catheters and any dialysis technique). We investigated the efficacy of the two categories of cooling methods in two different patient groups divided according to their initially documented rhythm at the scene (shockable or non-shockable) using multivariable logistic regression analysis and propensity score analysis with inverse probability weighting (IPW).Results: In the final analysis, 1082 patients were included. Of these, 513 (47.4%) had an initial shockable rhythm and 569 (52.6%) had an initial non-shockable rhythm. The proportion of patients with favourable neurological outcomes in SC and EC was 59.9% vs. 58.3% (264/441 vs. 42/72), 11.8% and (58/490) vs. 21.5% (17/79) in the initial shockable patients and the initial non-shockable patients, respectively. In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, differences between the two cooling methods were not observed among the initial shockable patients (adjusted odd ratio [AOR] 1.45, 95% CI 0.81–2.60), while EC was associated with better neurological outcome among the initial non-shockable patients (AOR 2.13, 95% CI 1.10–4.13). This association was constant in propensity score analysis with IPW (OR 1.40, 95% CI 0.83–2.36; OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.01–3.47 among the initial shockable and non-shockable patients, respectively).Conclusion: We demonstrated that the use of EC was associated with better neurological outcomes in OHCA patients with initial non-shockable rhythm, but not in those with initial shockable rhythm. A TTM implementation strategy based on initial rhythm may be important.Trial registration: None


Author(s):  
Ester Holmström ◽  
Ilmar Efendijev ◽  
Rahul Raj ◽  
Pirkka T. Pekkarinen ◽  
Erik Litonius ◽  
...  

Abstract Background Cardiac arrest (CA) is a leading cause of death worldwide. As population ages, the need for research focusing on CA in elderly increases. This study investigated treatment intensity, 12-month neurological outcome, mortality and healthcare-associated costs for patients aged over 75 years treated for CA in an intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary hospital. Methods This single-centre retrospective study included adult CA patients treated in a Finnish tertiary hospital’s ICU between 2005 and 2013. We stratified the study population into two age groups: <75 and $$\ge$$ ≥ 75 years. We compared interventions defined by the median daily therapeutic scoring system (TISS-76) between the age groups to find differences in treatment intensity. We calculated cost-effectiveness by dividing the total one-year healthcare-associated costs of all patients by the number of survivors with a favourable neurological outcome. Favourable outcome was defined as a cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1–2 at 12 months after cardiac arrest. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent associations between age group, mortality and neurological outcome. Results This study included a total of 1,285 patients, of which 212 (16 %) were $$\ge$$ ≥ 75 years of age. Treatment intensity was lower for the elderly compared to the younger group, with median TISS scores of 116 and 147, respectively (p < 0.001). The effective cost in euros for patients with a good one-year neurological outcome was €168,000 for the elderly and €120,000 for the younger group. At 12 months after CA 24 % of the patients in the elderly group and 47 % of the patients in the younger group had a CPC of 1–2 (p < 0.001). Age was an independent predictor of mortality (multivariate OR = 2.90, 95 % CI: 1.94–4.31, p < 0.001) and neurological outcome (multivariate OR = 3.15, 95 % CI: 2.04–4.86, p < 0.001). Conclusions The elderly ICU-treated CA patients in this study had worse neurological outcomes, higher mortality and lower cost-effectiveness than younger patients. Elderly received less intense treatment. Further efforts are needed to recognize the tools for assessing which elderly patients benefit from a more aggressive treatment approach in order to improve the cost-effectiveness of post-CA management.


Author(s):  
Andrew Fu Wah Ho ◽  
Timothy Xin Zhong Tan ◽  
Ejaz Latiff ◽  
Nur Shahidah ◽  
Yih Yng Ng ◽  
...  

Abstract Background Organ donation after brain death is the standard practice in many countries. Rates are low globally. This study explores the potential national number of candidates for uncontrolled donations after cardiac death (uDCD) amongst out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients and the influence of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) on the candidacy of these potential organ donors using Singapore as a case study. Methods Using Singapore data from the Pan-Asian Resuscitation Outcomes Study, we identified all non-traumatic OHCA cases from 2010 to 2016. Four established criteria for identifying uDCD candidates (Madrid, San Carlos Madrid, Maastricht and Paris) were retrospectively applied onto the population. Within these four groups, a condensed ECPR eligibility criteria was employed and thereafter, an estimated ECPR survival rate was applied, extrapolating for possible neurologically intact survivors had ECPR been administered. Results 12,546 OHCA cases (64.8% male, mean age 65.2 years old) qualified for analysis. The estimated number of OHCA patients who were eligible for uDCD ranged from 4.3 to 19.6%. The final projected percentage of potential uDCD donors readjusted for ECPR survivors was 4.2% (Paris criteria worst-case scenario, n = 532) to 19.4% of all OHCA cases (Maastricht criteria best-case scenario, n = 2428), for an estimated 14.3 to 65.4 uDCD donors per million population per year (pmp/year). Conclusions In Singapore case study, we demonstrated the potential numbers of candidates for uDCD among resuscitated OHCA cases. This sizeable pool of potential donors demonstrates the potential for an uDCD program to expand the organ donor pool. A small proportion of these patients might however survive had they been administered ECPR. Further research into the factors influencing local organ and patient outcomes following uDCD and ECPR is indicated.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Yu-Husan Lee ◽  
Jiashan Chen ◽  
Po-An Chen ◽  
Jen-Tang Sun ◽  
Bo-Hwi Kang ◽  
...  

Abstract BackgroundThe sign of contrast agent pooling (C.A.P.) in dependent part of the venous system were reported in some case reports, which happened in the patients before sudden cardiac arrest. Until now, there is no solid evidence enough to address the importance of the sign. This study aimed to assess the accuracy of the C.A.P. sign in predicting imminent cardiac arrest and the association of the C.A.P. sign with patient’s survival.MethodsThis is a retrospective cohort study. The study included 128 patients who visited the emergency department of Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, who received contrast computed tomography (CT) scan and then experienced cardiac arrest at the emergency department (from January 1, 2016 to December 31, 2018). With positive C.A.P. sign, the primary outcome is whether in-hospital cardiac arrest happens within an hour; the secondary outcome is survival to discharge.ResultsIn the study, 8.6% (N=11) patients had positive C.A.P. sign and 91.4% (N=117) patients did not. The accuracy of C.A.P. sign in predicting cardiac arrest within 1 hour is 85.94%. The C.A.P. sign had a positive association with IHCA within 1 hour after the CT scan (adjusted odds ratio 11.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.97 – 68.20). The odd ration of survival to discharge is 0.0081 with positive C.A.P. sign (95% CI 0.00697 – 2.188).ConclusionThe C.A.P. sign can be considered as an alarm for imminent cardiac arrest and poor prognosis. The patients with positive C.A.P. sign were more likely to experience imminent cardiac arrest; in contrast, less likely to survive. Trial registrationThe study was approved by our institutional ethical committee (IRB No.108107-E).


Heart Rhythm ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 18 (8) ◽  
pp. S476-S477
Author(s):  
Christopher C. Cheung ◽  
Brianna Davies ◽  
Jason D. Roberts ◽  
Rafik Tadros ◽  
Martin S. Green ◽  
...  

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