First Line
Recently Published Documents


TOTAL DOCUMENTS

26337
(FIVE YEARS 13735)

H-INDEX

205
(FIVE YEARS 83)

2021 ◽  
Vol 39 (28_suppl) ◽  
pp. 14-14
Author(s):  
Charu Aggarwal ◽  
Melina Elpi Marmarelis ◽  
Wei-Ting Hwang ◽  
Dylan G. Scholes ◽  
Aditi Puri Singh ◽  
...  

14 Background: Current NCCN guidelines recommend comprehensive molecular profiling for all newly diagnosed patients with metastatic non-squamous NSCLC to enable the delivery of personalized medicine. We have previously demonstrated that incorporation of plasma based next-generation gene sequencing (NGS) improves detection of clinically actionable mutations in patients with advanced NSCLC (Aggarwal et al, JAMA Oncology, 2018). To increase rates of comprehensive molecular testing at our institution, we adapted our clinical practice to include concurrent use of plasma (P) and tissue (T) based NGS upon initial diagnosis. P NGS testing was performed using a commercial 74 gene assay. We analyzed the impact of this practice change on guideline concordant molecular testing at our institution. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of patients with newly diagnosed metastatic non-squamous NSCLC following the implementation of this practice change in 12/2018 was performed. Tiers of NCCN guideline concordant testing were defined, Tier 1: complete EGFR, ALK, BRAF, ROS1, MET, RET, NTRK testing, Tier 2: included above, but with incomplete NTRK testing, Tier 3: > 2 genes tested, Tier 4: single gene testing, Tier 5: no testing. Proportion of patients with comprehensive molecular testing by modality (T NGS vs. T+P NGS) were compared using one-sided Fisher’s exact test. Results: Between 01/2019, and 12/2019, 170 patients with newly diagnosed metastatic non-Sq NSCLC were treated at our institution. Overall, 98.2% (167/170) patients underwent molecular testing, Tier 1: n = 100 (59%), Tier 2: n = 39 (23%), Tier 3/4: n = 28 (16.5%), Tier 5: n = 3 (2%). Amongst these patients, 43.1% (72/167) were tested with T NGS alone, 8% (15/167) with P NGS alone, and 47.9% (80/167) with T+P NGS. A higher proportion of patients underwent comprehensive molecular testing (Tiers 1+2) using T+P NGS: 95.7% (79/80) compared to T alone: 62.5% (45/72), p < 0.0005. Prior to the initiation of first line treatment, 72.4% (123/170) patients underwent molecular testing, Tier 1: n = 73 (59%), Tier 2: n = 27 (22%) and Tier 3/4: n = 23 (18%). Amongst these, 39% (48/123) were tested with T NGS alone, 7% (9/123) with P NGS alone and 53.6% (66/123) with T+P NGS. A higher proportion of patients underwent comprehensive molecular testing (Tiers 1+2) using T+P NGS, 100% (66/66) compared to 52% (25/48) with T NGS alone (p < 0.0005). Conclusions: Incorporation of concurrent T+P NGS testing in treatment naïve metastatic non-Sq NSCLC significantly increased the proportion of patients undergoing guideline concordant molecular testing, including prior to initiation of first-line therapy at our institution. Concurrent T+P NGS should be adopted into institutional pathways and routine clinical practice.


2021 ◽  
Vol 39 (28_suppl) ◽  
pp. 51-51
Author(s):  
Xiaoyun Pan ◽  
Lincy S. Lal ◽  
John White ◽  
Seyed Hamidreza Mahmoudpour ◽  
Christian Valencia

51 Background: In 2021, 14,480 patients are estimated to be diagnosed with cervical cancer in the US; 16% of patients are expected to have metastatic disease for whom the 5-year survival rate is 17.6% per SEER estimates. Patients with metastatic cervical cancer (mCC) are treated mainly with systemic therapy. This study aims to describe the clinical characteristics, demographics, treatment patterns, and economic burden of patients with mCC receiving systemic therapy. Methods: Eligible women had been diagnosed with cervical cancer, as evidenced by >2 outpatient or >1 inpatient claim in the Optum Research Database from January 2014 through January 2020. Patients were included if they had metastasis within 6 months before or after cervical cancer diagnosis, with evidence of systemic treatment on or after the latter of a claim date for cervical cancer disease or metastatic disease. The index date was the first-line treatment initiation date. Patients were required to have ≥6 months of pre-index continuous enrollment. The top 3 treatment regimens and median treatment duration by line of therapy were described. All-cause per-patient-per-month (PPPM) costs (2019 US dollars), including plan and patient paid amounts, were reported for full follow-up period from first-line and second-line therapy initiation. Results: The study sample consisted of 778 patients (mean age, 59 years; commercial, 58%; Medicare Advantage, 42%). The mean (median) follow-up period was 14 (9) months. Top baseline comorbidities were diseases of the urinary system (71%) and diseases of the female genital organs (70%), and the median Charlson comorbidity index was 7. In the first line, 80% of patients received platinum-based therapy and 23% received bevacizumab (bev). Of 778 patients, only 294 (38%) received second-line therapy, with 34% receiving bev. Top first-line treatment regimens were carboplatin + paclitaxel (27%), cisplatin (21%), and bev + carboplatin + paclitaxel (10%); the median (95% CI) duration of treatment was 3.4 (3.1-3.7) months. Top second-line treatment regimens were bev + carboplatin + paclitaxel (13%), carboplatin + paclitaxel (11%), and pembrolizumab (6%); the median duration of treatment was 3.8 (3.1-4.2) months. Mean all-cause total PPPM costs were $19,519 from first-line and $22,660 second-line therapy initiation (table). Conclusions: This study indicates that real-world mCC patients have short treatment durations and significant economic burden with first-line and second-line therapy. Novel therapies associated with greater clinical benefits in patients with mCC may provide economic benefit.[Table: see text]


2021 ◽  
Vol 39 (28_suppl) ◽  
pp. 291-291
Author(s):  
Jinan Liu ◽  
Eric M Maiese ◽  
Bruno Émond ◽  
Marie-Hélène Lafeuille ◽  
Patrick Lefebvre ◽  
...  

291 Background: Among patients (pts) with endometrial cancer (EC), response rates for platinum-based regimens in the first-line (1L) setting range from 40% to 62% in clinical trials. This study describes patient characteristics, treatment patterns, time to next treatment (TTNT), and overall survival (OS) among pts with advanced/recurrent EC treated with a platinum-based regimen in a real-world setting in the US. Methods: This retrospective study used Optum Clinformatics Extended Data Mart de-identified databases from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2019. Adult pts with advanced/recurrent EC who initiated a 1L platinum-based regimen and subsequently initiated second-line (2L) antineoplastic therapy were identified. Prior to initiation of 1L, a 12-month washout period of continuous enrollment without use of antineoplastic agents (except hormonal agents) was imposed. Kaplan-Meier (KM) rates were used to report TTNT and OS from 2L, third line (3L), and fourth line (4L), separately. Results: A total of 1878 pts with advanced/recurrent EC initiated 2L therapy following a platinum-based regimen in 1L. Among them, 739 (39.4%) pts initiated 3L and 330 (17.6%) initiated 4L or later (4L+) therapy. Median pt age was 68.0 years. More pts received platinum-based regimens (56.4%) in 2L than other options (Table). Few pts (3.3%) received immunotherapy. Among pts receiving 3L, a similar percentage of pts were treated with platinum-based (33.2%) and other chemotherapy regimens (33.8%); few pts received immunotherapy (3.0%). Among pts receiving 4L+, the most frequent treatment option was other chemotherapy (46.1%). Median TTNT was 17.7, 10.6, and 8.4 months for 2L, 3L, and 4L pts, respectively. KM rates of OS following initiation of 2L therapy at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years were 68.4%, 49.6%, 41.3%, and 33.6%, respectively, with a median OS of 23.5 months. Conclusions: Among pts with advanced/recurrent EC treated with platinum-based therapy in 1L, platinum-based regimens remain prevalent treatment choices in later lines of therapy. In this study, immunotherapy was used infrequently in 2L, 3L, and 4L+. The median TTNT decreased in later lines of therapy. This study highlights a critical need for novel, more effective treatment options in later lines of therapy to optimize outcomes among pts with advanced/recurrent EC.[Table: see text]


2021 ◽  
Vol 39 (28_suppl) ◽  
pp. 244-244
Author(s):  
Stephanie Ossowski ◽  
Elad Neeman ◽  
Charles Borden ◽  
Amy Ying Ju Lin ◽  
Raymond Liu

244 Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) is a crucial component of evaluation of newly diagnosed patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to determine appropriate first line treatment. Delays in NGS can lead to psychologic distress for patients and can affect choices in first line therapy, especially for patients with underlying targetable mutations. While more data is needed to benchmark turnaround time for NGS results, guidelines and expert consensus suggest time from diagnosis to treatment should be 15 days and turnaround time for genomic testing 10-14 days. This study was aimed at reducing time to NGS results in a large integrated health care system. Methods: Through the ASCO Quality Training Program, we reviewed electronic medical records of 25 patients with newly diagnosed, untreated metastatic NSCLC from 12/2018 to 9/2020 and determined number of days from pathological diagnosis to NGS results. We reviewed process maps for oncology, pathology, the internal data management division, and a genomic testing company to determine factors leading to significant preventable delays. Since 11/2020, we created an automated weekly report using CoPath to identify new pathological diagnoses of potential metastatic NSCLC. The oncology department reviewed these cases weekly and NGS orders were placed for patients with metastatic NSCLC. Eleven additional patients with newly diagnosed metastatic NSCLC were included in the prospective cohort. Results: Demographic characteristics are noted in Table. Our intervention reduced median time from pathological diagnosis to NGS results from 24 to 19 days. Median time from biopsy results to NGS order was reduced from 7 to 1 day. Time from specimen being sent from pathology to NGS vendor was a median of 6 days in both cohorts. Total time from pathological diagnosis to appropriate treatment was reduced from a median of 33 to 25 days. Conclusions: Delays in time to NGS results can be reduced by improved communication between departments and simple, automated interventions to ensure results are efficiently released to an oncologist. Additional Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles are currently being developed to further reduce time from biopsy results to NGS results. [Table: see text]


2021 ◽  
Vol 39 (28_suppl) ◽  
pp. 292-292
Author(s):  
Shiru Liu ◽  
Wing Chan ◽  
Genevieve Bouchard-Fortier ◽  
Stephanie Lheureux ◽  
Sarah Ferguson ◽  
...  

292 Background: Initial treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) consists of combination of cytoreductive surgery (CSR) and/or chemotherapy. Targeted therapies such as bevacizumab have shown to improve outcomes in a subset population with high-risk features. Real-world patterns of systemic therapy delivery in EOC in the modern era are not well understood. Our objective is to evaluate the patterns of first-line systemic treatment of advanced EOC in Ontario, focusing on adoption of bevacizumab, which was approved for use in 2016. Methods: We conducted a retrospective, population cohort study using administrative databases held at the ICES in Ontario, Canada. Patients diagnosed with non-mucinous EOC between 2014 and 2018 were identified from the Ontario Cancer Registry; early-stage disease was excluded. Information on systemic therapy was obtained from Activity Level Reporting and New Drug Funding Program databases. Provider of care (gynecologic oncologist vs medical oncologist) information was obtained from billing codes. Academic cancer centers were identified using validated systemic facility codes from Cancer Care Ontario. Statistical analyses include descriptive statistics, t-tests, and multivariable logistic regression using SAS. Results: Out of 4,680 cases diagnosed with EOC during the study period, 3,632 (77.6%) were considered advanced stage. Median age of cohort was between 65-70, and the majority had Charlson score of 1-2 (97%) and are urban (91.8%). A total of 3,181 (87.6%) patients underwent CRS and 2,722(74.9%) patients underwent chemotherapy. Of those who received chemotherapy, 1,259 (46.2%) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 1,012 (37.2%) received upfront CRS, and 451(16.5%) received chemotherapy only. The majority of chemotherapy was delivered by gynecologic oncologists (60.6%) and in academic cancer centres (61.7%). There was no significant difference in use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy between medical oncologists and gynecologic oncologists (p = 0.67). Only 53 chemotherapy patients (1.9%) received bevacizumab containing-regimen in the first-line setting. Medical oncologists were 4 times more likely to administer bevacizumab-containing regimen compared to gynecologic oncologists (OR 4.03, 95% CI.29 – 7.36) after adjusting for age, stage, Charlson score and rurality score on logistic regression. Delivery of bevacizumab is relatively higher in non-academic cancer centres (OR 2.61, 95% CI 2.32- 2.94) while 83% of intraperitoneal chemotherapy is delivered in academic cancer centres. Conclusions: Patterns of care of EOC in Ontario remain heterogenous between care providers and institutions, while uptake of bevacizumab for first-line treatment of EOC remains low. Factors leading to low uptake and real-world outcomes should be explored.


2021 ◽  
Vol 39 (28_suppl) ◽  
pp. 300-300
Author(s):  
Anthony Sireci ◽  
Peter M Krein ◽  
Lisa M. Hess ◽  
Taha Khan ◽  
Joanne P. Willey ◽  
...  

300 Background: This study evaluated rates of biomarker testing for patients with stage IV non-squamous NSCLC, which is known to have a ̃40% biomarker-positive rate (AMP, 2020), in a community-based oncology practice setting in the United States (US). Methods: A retrospective study was performed using data from a US electronic medical record database of patients aged ≥18 years with an initial diagnosis (index dx) of stage IV non-squamous NSCLC between Jan 1, 2015 and Dec 31, 2019. Unstructured data on molecular biomarker testing (single-gene and next-generation sequencing [NGS]-based) were abstracted from patient charts utilizing Natural Language Processing for EGFR mutation, ALK rearrangement, BRAF mutation, ROS1 rearrangement, MET exon14 mutation, RET fusion, NTRK fusion, and PD-L1 expression. Systemic therapy was obtained from structured data. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics. This study received a waiver of consent from Advarra IRB. Results: Of 646 patients identified in the database, 500 met all inclusion criteria and are included in this analysis. The majority (73.8%) were diagnosed in 2018 (n = 162; 32.4%) and 2019 (n = 207; 41.4%). Mean age (SD) was 70.0 (10.1) years, with 53.2% female. A total of 447 (89.4%) were tested for at least one biomarker after index diagnosis of which 81.2% (n = 406) had at least one single-gene test; 54.8% (n = 274) had an NGS test and 66.8% were tested for PD-L1. Single-gene or NGS-based testing was > 85% of patients across all index years. The use of NGS-based tests ranged from 35.0% among patients whose first diagnosis was in 2015 to 59.4% in 2019. Overall, 85.4% (n = 427) of the cohort received first-line treatment with chemotherapy (53.6%), immunotherapy (48.2%), or targeted therapy (14.2%). Among patients who received biomarker tests, 15.4% received targeted treatment and 49.7% received immunotherapy treatment, including checkpoint inhibitors, during first-line treatment. Conclusions: NGS testing utilization increased during the study period and by 2019, 59% of patients received NGS-based testing. Opportunities persist for practices to improve testing and achieve guideline recommendations. PD-L1 biomarker testing was performed amongst the highest proportion of patients in this study and nearly 50% of all patients received immunotherapy, including checkpoint inhibitors. Targeted therapy was used in 14.2% of this population, suggesting that patients with actionable biomarkers may not be receiving targeted treatment for their disease, potentially due to gaps in testing among patients in this dataset.


2021 ◽  
Vol 39 (28_suppl) ◽  
pp. 248-248
Author(s):  
Catherine Dunn ◽  
Lucy Gately ◽  
Jeanne Tie ◽  
Louise M. Nott ◽  
Belinda Lee ◽  
...  

248 Background: Quality indicators (QI) are essential to monitor the efficacy of cancer care and to guide quality improvement, however many are derived from ‘expert consensus’ and are not validated against outcomes. Moreover, the majority of oncological QI are defined in the surgical setting, with only a paucity of QI for the treatment of metastatic disease. We aimed to define and validate novel QI for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) based on therapeutic approaches associated with a proven survival benefit. Methods: Data was analysed from TRACC, a multisite Australian registry collecting prospective demographic, tumour, treatment and outcome data for mCRC. We identified all patients diagnosed across 11 hospitals and explored variation by site with regards to patient and tumour characteristics, first-line chemotherapy administration and resection of oligometastatic disease. Log-rank testing and Kaplan-Meier curves compare overall survival (OS) between sites, and Pearson correlation was used to assess associations with each QI. Results: We examined data from 3132 patients diagnosed with mCRC between July 2009 – April 2021. Median age was 66 years (range 62 – 71 years by site), ECOG 0-1 81% (range 69 – 96% by site), and Charlson Comorbidity Index ≤2 43% (33 – 59% by site). Multivariate analysis confirmed association of known adverse prognostic factors with inferior OS (poor ECOG, right sided primary, KRAS or BRAF mutation, all p <0.05). Median OS for entire cohort was 26.2 months (95%CI 24.9 – 27.3 months), and varied by hospital site from 20.1 – 36.1 months (p<0.001). Of the QI evaluated, rate of triplet chemotherapy (FOLFOXIRI) administration (2.8 – 13.2% by site) was very strongly correlated with OS (R2 = 0.851), rate of liver resection (9.8 – 23.2% by site) was moderately correlated (R2 = 0.523), and rates of active treatment with first-line chemotherapy (63 - 90% by site) were weakly correlated (R2 = 0.209). Other proposed QI such as rates of lung metastases resection or chemotherapy administration in the elderly showed significant variation by site, but did not correlate with survival. Conclusions: There is significant variation in OS for patients with mCRC in these Australian hospitals, with major differences in treatment approaches. Treatment strategies known to improve survival outcomes, such as triplet FOLFOXIRI chemotherapy and resection of liver metastases, may be potential QI to benchmark and track quality improvement over time. Further analysis will determine the impact of baseline patient populations between sites, and to correlate these QI with other quality measures.


2021 ◽  
Vol 39 (28_suppl) ◽  
pp. 167-167
Author(s):  
Elena Elimova ◽  
Lucjan Wyrwicz ◽  
Steven I. Blum ◽  
Hong Xiao ◽  
Mingshun Li ◽  
...  

167 Background: CheckMate 649 (NCT02872116) is a randomized, open label phase 3 study in first line (1L) treatment of pts with advanced GC/GEJC/EAC. Primary analysis results showed statistically significant improvement in overall survival (OS) for NIVO+chemo vs. chemo in all randomized pts. We present HRQOL results for these pts, included as an exploratory study objective. Methods: HRQOL was assessed using EQ-5D-3L (EQ-5D) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Gastric Cancer (FACT-Ga). Assessments were performed at baseline (BL), every 6 weeks during treatment and during follow-up. Change from BL EQ-5D Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Utility Index (UI) and FACT-Ga scores were analyzed using mixed models. Time to first symptom deterioration (TTSD), time until definitive deterioration (TuDD), and time to improvement (TTI) were estimated with Kaplan-Meier estimators and stratified Cox models; deterioration/improvement was based on prespecified meaningful change thresholds. Results: 1581 pts were randomized to NIVO+chemo (n = 789) or chemo (n = 792). Among 1359 pts with BL and post-BL patient-reported outcomes (NIVO+chemo, n = 693; chemo, n = 666), BL scores for FACT-Ga total were similar between treatment groups. Least squares mean differences from BL favored NIVO+chemo at most visits for EQ-5D, FACT-Ga total, and Gastric Cancer Subscale (GaCS), and were comparable for other subscales (not shown). TTI generally favored NIVO+chemo (most HR > 1) but was not significantly different between arms. TTSD was longer in NIVO+chemo arm compared with chemo alone (all HRs < 1), except for Emotional Well-Being (WB); only GaCS and FACT-Ga total were significantly different between arms. TuDD showed statistically significant delays in deterioration (HR with CI < 1) for all scores expect Social WB. Conclusions: Compared with chemo alone, the addition of NIVO to chemo maintained HRQoL with a decreased risk of symptom deterioration in patients with previously untreated advanced or metastatic GC/GEJC/EAC. Together with improved OS, these data support NIVO+chemo as a new 1L standard treatment for GC/GEJC/EAC. Clinical trial information: NCT02872116. [Table: see text]


2021 ◽  
Vol 39 (28_suppl) ◽  
pp. 290-290
Author(s):  
Jinan Liu ◽  
Premal H. Thaker ◽  
Janvi Sah ◽  
Eric M Maiese ◽  
Linda Kalilani ◽  
...  

290 Background: PARP inhibitor (PARPi) and bevacizumab have been integrated into the first-line (1L) maintenance therapy for patients (pts) with ovarian cancer (OC). However, due to adverse events, the rate of PARPi maintenance discontinuation was 12% in the SOLO1 clinical trial. We aimed to better understand the rate and cause of maintenance therapy discontinuation in real-world practice. Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted using de-identified electronic health record (EHR)–derived data from the nationwide Flatiron Health electronic health database. From January 1, 2016, to February 29, 2020, data were obtained for pts with newly diagnosed stage III/IV epithelial OC who received primary debulking surgery followed by 6–9 cycles of 1L platinum-based chemo or neoadjuvant chemo followed by interval debulking surgery. Index date was the end of 1L systemic therapy. Results: Of 675 pts with stage III/IV OC who underwent primary systemic therapy, 144 (21.3%) received 1L maintenance therapy and were included in the analysis. Mean age was 65.0 y. Most pts were treated in community practice (93.1%), had ECOG score of 0–1 at diagnosis (81.3%), and were shown to be BRCA wild type (66.7%). Bevacizumab was the most common 1L maintenance therapy (n = 69, 47.9%), followed by olaparib (n = 46, 31.9%), paclitaxel (n = 18, 12.5%), rucaparib (n = 10, 6.9%), and gemcitabine (n = 1, 0.7%). Overall, 34 (23.6%) pts discontinued 1L maintenance therapy. The most common reason for discontinuation was disease progression (n = 19, 13.2%), followed by treatment-related toxicity (n = 13, 9.0%; Table). Of 56 pts who received PARPi (olaparib or rucaparib) 1L maintenance therapy, 21 (37.5%) pts discontinued treatment: 11 (19.6%) because of disease progression, 9 (16.0%) treatment-related toxicity, and 1 for other reasons. Conclusions: In pts with advanced OC who received 1L maintenance therapy in clinical practice, disease progression was the most common reason for maintenance therapy discontinuation. The rates of toxicity-related discontinuations were comparable with those reported in clinical trials.[Table: see text]


Sign in / Sign up

Export Citation Format

Share Document