Robotics Education
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2021 ◽  
Vol 28 (3) ◽  
pp. 187-190
Author(s):  
Fabrizio Taffoni

Author(s):  
Baichang Zhong ◽  
Liying Xia

Author(s):  
Dorin Popescu ◽  
Horatiu Roibu ◽  
Nicolita Guta ◽  
Adrian-Cosmin Cruceru

2021 ◽  
Vol 1 ◽  
pp. 40
Author(s):  
Dimitris ALIMISIS

The H2020 project “INBOTS: Inclusive Robotics for a Better Society” (2018­–21) has worked in different disciplines involved in the acceptance and uptake of interactive robotics, including the promotion of accessible and multidisciplinary education programs. In INBOTS, educational robotics is considered as a learning tool that can bring robotics into school classrooms and benefit all children regardless of their future educational or professional orientation. Aiming to make robotics education inclusive, INBOTS has introduced a paradigm shift inspired by sound pedagogies (Papert’s constructionism) and emerging educational trends (the maker movement) and focused on creativity and other 21st-century skills. However, the realisation of this new paradigm requires appropriate curricula and technologies at both hardware and software levels. This paper addresses several questions and dilemmas related to the technologies currently in use in robotics education and the kind of technologies that can best support the proposed paradigm. This discussion results in specific criteria that robotics technologies must fulfil to foster the new paradigm. Based on these criteria, we review some representative technologies in both hardware and software. Then, we identify and discuss some technological solutions that exemplify the kind of technologies that can best support inclusive robotics education and make the proposed paradigm feasible. Finally, we show how some of these technologies can be combined to design a creative and inclusive project consistent with the criteria set in this paper.


Author(s):  
Maged Mikhail ◽  
Vu Duong ◽  
Damian Podgorski
Keyword(s):  

Author(s):  
Jing Ru Qu ◽  
Ping Kwan Fok

AbstractThis research focuses on student–robot interaction in the learning environment of robotics education (RE) and attempts to explore how it cultivates students’ computational thinking (CT). Different from child–robot interactions as investigated in the social robot field, student–robot (S–R) interactions focus mainly on the process of interaction between learners and programmable robot kits in RE settings. At a four-week robotics summer camp in China, mixed-methods research was conducted. Forty primary school students and one dedicated robotics teacher participated in this research, while 32 students and the teacher completed all the lessons and data collection procedures of the summer camp. Results indicated that students’ CT skill increased during the summer camp and that the change in their CT skill was positively correlated to the time spent on S–R interaction. Additionally, how three kinds of S–R interaction—programming-computing, observational investigation, and participatory investigation—cultivated students’ CT were found. Moreover, the hierarchy of three S–R interactions and students’ role-shifting in the hierarchy were discussed. Previous studies rarely discussed S–R interaction; however, this kind of interaction should be explored because it provides more information about students’ natural learning process, which might be meaningful to RE practice.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Patricia Gouws ◽  
Hugo Lotriet ◽  
Mukondeleli Grace Kanakana-Katumba ◽  
Denzil Chetty

This paper focuses on the limited literature pertaining to robotics MOOCs within the STEM MOOC domain. This study provides a subset of an ongoing, more extensive systematic review of the recent advances with MOOCs to advance STEM education and engagement. The purpose of this study is to identify and discuss the place and role of robotics (as a subset of STEM) MOOCs in an open distance e-learning institution of higher education. The study provides insights into the research gaps existing in (1)literature, and (2)the domain of STEM MOOCs for robotics education and STEM engagement. The place and role of STEM MOOCs for the advancement of robotics within an open distance e-learning institution provide a practical and sustainable solution to science engagement in these times of Covid.


2021 ◽  
Vol 27 (5) ◽  
pp. 364-372
Author(s):  
Seul Jung

2021 ◽  
Vol 1 ◽  
pp. 40
Author(s):  
Dimitris ALIMISIS

The H2020 project “INBOTS: Inclusive Robotics for a Better Society” (2018­–21) has worked in different disciplines involved in the acceptance and uptake of interactive robotics, including the promotion of accessible and multidisciplinary education programs. In INBOTS, educational robotics is considered as a learning tool that can bring robotics into school classrooms and benefit all children regardless of their future educational or professional orientation. Aiming to make robotics education inclusive, INBOTS has introduced a paradigm shift inspired by sound pedagogies (Papert’s constructionism) and emerging educational trends (the maker movement) and focused on creativity and other 21st-century skills. However, the realisation of this new paradigm requires appropriate curricula and technologies at both hardware and software levels. This paper addresses several questions and dilemmas related to the technologies currently in use in robotics education and the kind of technologies that can best support the proposed paradigm. This discussion results in specific criteria that robotics technologies must fulfil to foster the new paradigm. Based on these criteria, we review some representative technologies in both hardware and software. Then, we identify and discuss some technological solutions that exemplify the kind of technologies that can best support inclusive robotics education and make the proposed paradigm feasible. Finally, we show how some of these technologies can be combined to design a creative and inclusive project consistent with the criteria set in this paper.


2021 ◽  
Vol 28 (1) ◽  
pp. 12-15
Author(s):  
Shawna Thomas

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