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2021 ◽  
Vol 31 (2) ◽  
pp. 100-109
Author(s):  
Khouas MAKHLOUF ADEL ◽  
◽  
Telaidjia DJAMEL ◽  
Habibi YAHYAOUI ◽  
◽  
...  

The study of the phenomenon of flooding in an urban environment requires the integration of the city in its physical context, in this case the entire impluvium. Thus, the consideration of all the hydrological, morphometric and physical characteristics (topography, lithology, land cover...). In order to put in place appropriate measures to improve urban resilience and protect the population and their property in the capital of Algeria (City of Algiers), a hydrological modeling must be carried out upstream to evaluate the hydrological response of the watershed. This modeling was done using the auxiliary tool HEC-GEO HMS, an extension that works in a GIS environment (ArcGIS).


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Mitchell Lee Solomon ◽  
Micah Billouin ◽  
Kevin Chow ◽  
Jad Zeineddine ◽  
Alex Almaraz ◽  
...  

2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Samuel Journeaux

<p>This thesis seeks to investigate the role of architecture in distilling of ephemerality within a fixed geometry; using the variables of light, texture, context and atmospheric conditions as experimental catalysts. Consequently, this research explores the notion that a rigid architecture can play a central role in the creation of temporal atmosphere. It investigates this proposition by developing a method to represent ephemerality through architectural form and medium with an iterative design process as the overarching methodology.  The design research begins with establishing the literary and physical context of projective geometries, abstraction of ‘place’ and atmospheric manipulation. This follows onto a three-part design-led exploration, with each test increasing in scale and architectural complexity. These include a site less installation, a gallery and a rehabilitation centre site on the rugged South Brighton coastline. This series explores the relationship between the temporary and the constant, with lessons learnt from each previous experiment translated into the later. These develop a range of architectural techniques for distilling ephemerality within fixed geometries with social response and programmatic factors being supplementary factors.The research recognises the already well established study into the ephemerality of spatial conditions within the architectural discourse and seeks to build on this through abstraction of place and site specific design responses.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Samuel Journeaux

<p>This thesis seeks to investigate the role of architecture in distilling of ephemerality within a fixed geometry; using the variables of light, texture, context and atmospheric conditions as experimental catalysts. Consequently, this research explores the notion that a rigid architecture can play a central role in the creation of temporal atmosphere. It investigates this proposition by developing a method to represent ephemerality through architectural form and medium with an iterative design process as the overarching methodology.  The design research begins with establishing the literary and physical context of projective geometries, abstraction of ‘place’ and atmospheric manipulation. This follows onto a three-part design-led exploration, with each test increasing in scale and architectural complexity. These include a site less installation, a gallery and a rehabilitation centre site on the rugged South Brighton coastline. This series explores the relationship between the temporary and the constant, with lessons learnt from each previous experiment translated into the later. These develop a range of architectural techniques for distilling ephemerality within fixed geometries with social response and programmatic factors being supplementary factors.The research recognises the already well established study into the ephemerality of spatial conditions within the architectural discourse and seeks to build on this through abstraction of place and site specific design responses.</p>


2021 ◽  
Vol 43 (3) ◽  
pp. 347-374
Author(s):  
Hans-Jürgen P. Walter

Summary In 1919 Nicolai Hartmann (NH) convincingly justified that there cannot exist a “general law of causation” as A. Meinong had in mind. For him Meinong’s understanding of causation (linear, successive in time) was bound on the region of the physical layer of being, simultaneously postulating it as the only possible causation there. This is the starting point of the comparison between N. Hartmann‘s understanding of causation and that of the Gestalt Theory, for which neither in psychic nor in natural (physical) context linear-successive causality plays a part. Therefore NH’s conception of 1919 was still completely incompatible with that of the Gestalt Theory despite the fact that he was distancing himself from the “general law of causation” sensu Meinong. 20 years later he changed this by adding the “Wechselwirkung” (interaction) to the linear successive causation in the physical layer. In doing so he approached the Gestalt theoretical position but failed it insofar as for it his linear-successive understanding of causation generally has had its day with regard to natural processes, also consequently for the physical (instead interaction between system and border conditions applies, an interaction of field forces). Thus the term “causation“ had become free for a dynamic concept of causation which is equally appropriate for the physical and the psychic. NH makes this move not until 1949, shortly before his death, by writing: ... (see original quotation in the German summary above). It is the opinion of the author of this work that the ingenious systematics of NH‘s Critical Ontology (which is not a closed system) should make it possible to execute the necessary corrections in some details of his theory of layers without questioning the structure of his systematics, thus carrying out what NH was not able to do himself due to his death.


Trials ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 22 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
C. Timmermans ◽  
M. Roerdink ◽  
C. G. M. Meskers ◽  
P. J. Beek ◽  
T. W. J. Janssen

Abstract Background The ability to adapt walking to environmental properties and hazards, a prerequisite for safe ambulation, is often impaired in persons after stroke. Research question The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two walking-adaptability interventions: a novel treadmill-based C-Mill therapy (using gait-dependent augmented reality) and the standard overground FALLS program (using physical context). We expected sustained improvements for both treatment groups combined but hypothesized better outcomes for C-Mill therapy than the FALLS program due to its expected greater amount of walking practice. Methods In this pre-registered single-centre parallel group randomized controlled trial, forty persons after stroke (≥ 3 months ago) with walking and/or balance deficits were randomly allocated to either 5 weeks of C-Mill therapy or the FALLS program. The primary outcome measure was the standard walking speed as determined with the 10-meter walking test (10MWT). Additionally, context-specific walking speed was assessed in environments enriched with either stationary physical context (10MWT context) or suddenly appearing visual images (Interactive Walkway obstacles). The walking-adaptability scores of those enriched walking tests served as secondary outcome measures. Furthermore, a cognitive task was added to all three assessments to evaluate dual-task performance in this context. Finally, the participants’ experience and amount of walking practice were scored. The outcome measures were assessed at four test moments: pre-intervention (T0), post-intervention (T1), 5-week post-intervention retention (T2), and 1-year post-intervention follow-up (T3). Results No significant group differences were found between the interventions for the primary outcome measure standard walking speed, but we found a greater improvement in context-specific walking speed with stationary physical context of the C-Mill therapy compared to the FALLS program at the post-intervention test, which was no longer significant at retention. Both interventions were well received, but C-Mill therapy scored better on perceived increased fitness than the FALLS program. C-Mill therapy resulted in twice as many steps per session of equal duration than the FALLS program. The “change-over-time” analyses for participants of both interventions combined showed no significant improvements in the standard walking speed; however, significant improvements were found for context-specific walking speed, walking adaptability, and cognitive dual-task performance. Significance This study showed no between-group differences between the novel treadmill-based C-Mill therapy and the standard overground FALLS program with respect to the primary outcome measure standard walking speed. However, the greater amount of walking practice observed for the C-Mill group, an essential aspect of effective intervention programs after stroke, may underlie the reported increased perceived fitness and observed increased context-specific walking speed for the C-Mill group directly after the intervention. Although the “change-over-time” results for all participants combined showed no improvement in the standard walking speed, context-specific walking speed and walking adaptability showed sustained improvements after the interventions, underscoring the importance of including walking-adaptability training and assessment in rehabilitation post stroke. Trial registration The Netherlands Trial Register NTR4030. Registered 11 June 2013.


MAUSAM ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 48 (3) ◽  
pp. 405-412
Author(s):  
RAJMAL JAIN ◽  
S.C. TRIPATHY

ABSTRACT. The cross correlation among 102 years rainfall data in Udaipur subtropical region and sunspots show tpe influence of solar activity on the climatic conditions of Udaipur. The periodicity obtained using rainfall and other data sets. such as. water storage of Jaisamand lake and gauge measurements of two rivers. Jakham and Karmoi, are similar to the periodicity of sunspots, which indicates a relationship between rainfall and sunspot activity. A period of about 27% is found to deviate from normal rains in the form of flood. excess and deficit of rains in Udaipur sub-tropical region. The possible physical mechanisms to explain sun-weather relationship in astro-physical context are discussed.    


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Charlotte Langridge

<p>As museums develop their roles as social and political forces, the role of the exhibition designer has evolved and become more complex. The new role demands increased consideration as new technologies impact the demand for recreational learning experiences (Lake-Hammond & White, 2015). Nearly thirty years ago Pulitzer Prize-winning author Stephen Greenblatt introduced the terms ‘resonance and wonder’ to describe the viewer’s experience and connection to the exhibits. Greenblatt asserted both ‘resonance and wonder’ as essential to an exhibition experience but stressed the need for a balance between the two (1991). The significance of Greenblatt’s perspective has become more prominent with the current shift in museum exhibitions that engage technological forms of representation. This study asserts that Greenblatt’s argument continues to be relevant today, as museum professionals arbitrate the balances and imbalances posed between resonance, now interpreted as worth, and wonder. The terms were first defined through thematic analysis to identify consistent elements that produce the concepts and further applied to the narrative analysis on perspectives of technological integration in museums. Using the broader contemporary definitions of ‘wonder and worth’ this research then applied what was learned from the literature to a physical context by analysing use of wonder and worth in two current exhibitions; Te Papa’s 2015 “Gallipoli: Scale of Our War” and Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum’s 2014 interactive pen design. In doing so the main finding suggested that the balance of wonder and worth can be achieved through encouraging a human connection and empathy which can be extended with the use of new technologies that are appropriate for the intent of the exhibit. These findings were delivered in the form of a manifesto to facilitate the exhibition design process, encourage consideration for the balance between wonder and worth and lessen the stigma around technological representation in museums.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Charlotte Langridge

<p>As museums develop their roles as social and political forces, the role of the exhibition designer has evolved and become more complex. The new role demands increased consideration as new technologies impact the demand for recreational learning experiences (Lake-Hammond & White, 2015). Nearly thirty years ago Pulitzer Prize-winning author Stephen Greenblatt introduced the terms ‘resonance and wonder’ to describe the viewer’s experience and connection to the exhibits. Greenblatt asserted both ‘resonance and wonder’ as essential to an exhibition experience but stressed the need for a balance between the two (1991). The significance of Greenblatt’s perspective has become more prominent with the current shift in museum exhibitions that engage technological forms of representation. This study asserts that Greenblatt’s argument continues to be relevant today, as museum professionals arbitrate the balances and imbalances posed between resonance, now interpreted as worth, and wonder. The terms were first defined through thematic analysis to identify consistent elements that produce the concepts and further applied to the narrative analysis on perspectives of technological integration in museums. Using the broader contemporary definitions of ‘wonder and worth’ this research then applied what was learned from the literature to a physical context by analysing use of wonder and worth in two current exhibitions; Te Papa’s 2015 “Gallipoli: Scale of Our War” and Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum’s 2014 interactive pen design. In doing so the main finding suggested that the balance of wonder and worth can be achieved through encouraging a human connection and empathy which can be extended with the use of new technologies that are appropriate for the intent of the exhibit. These findings were delivered in the form of a manifesto to facilitate the exhibition design process, encourage consideration for the balance between wonder and worth and lessen the stigma around technological representation in museums.</p>


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