Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
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Published By Springer-Verlag

1432-0711, 0932-0067

Author(s):  
Antonio Travaglino ◽  
Antonio Raffone ◽  
Diego Raimondo ◽  
Sabrina Reppuccia ◽  
Alessandro Ruggiero ◽  
...  

Abstract Background In the last years, mutations in the exon 3 of CTNNB1 have emerged as a possible prognostic factor for recurrence in early stage endometrioid endometrial carcinoma, especially in cases with no specific molecular profile (NSMP). Objective To define the prognostic value of CTNNB1 mutations in early stage endometrioid endometrial carcinoma, through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods Electronic databases were searched from their inception to November 2020 for all studies assessing the prognostic value of CTNNB1 mutation in early stage (FIGO I–II) endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. Odds ratio (OR) for tumor recurrence and hazard ratio (HR) for disease-free survival (DFS) were calculated with a significant p value < 0.05. Results Seven studies with 1031 patients were included. Four studies were suitable for meta-analysis of OR and showed significant association between CTNNB1 mutation and the absolute number of recurrence (OR = 3.000; p = 0.019); the association became stronger after excluding patients with known molecular status other than NSMP (HR = 5.953; p = 0.012). Three studies were suitable for meta-analysis of HR and showed no significant association between CTNNB1 mutation and decreased DFS (HR = 1.847; p = 0.303); the association became significant after excluding patients with known molecular status other than NSMP (HR = 2.831; p = 0.026). Conclusion CTNNB1 mutation is significantly associated with recurrence in early stage endometrioid endometrial carcinomas, especially in the NSMP, appearing potentially useful in directing adjuvant treatment.


Author(s):  
Legese Chelkeba ◽  
Korinan Fanta ◽  
Temesgen Mulugeta ◽  
Tsegaye Melaku

Abstract Background Globally, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) restricted the armamentarium of the health care providers against infectious diseases, mainly due to the emergence of multidrug resistant. This review is aimed at providing contemporary bacterial profile and antimicrobial resistance pattern among pregnant women with significant bacteriuria. Methods Electronic biomedical databases and indexing services such as PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, EMBASE and Google Scholar were searched. Original records of research articles, available online from 2008 to 2021, addressing the prevalence of significant bacteriuria and AMR pattern among pregnant women and written in English were identified and screened. The relevant data were extracted from included studies using a format prepared in Microsoft Excel and exported to STATA 14.0 software for the outcome measure analyses and subgrouping. Results The data of 5894 urine samples from 20 included studies conducted in 8 regions of the country were pooled. The overall pooled estimate of bacteriuria was 15% (95% CI 13–17%, I2 = 77.94%, p < 0.001) with substantial heterogeneity. The pooled estimate of Escherichia coli recovered from isolates of 896 urine samples was 41% (95% CI 38–45%) followed by coagulase-negative Staphylococci, 22% (95% CI 18–26%), Staphylococcus aureus, 15% (95% CI 12–18%), Staphylococcus saprophytic, 12% (95% CI 6–18%) Proteus mirabilis, 7% (95% CI 4–10%), Enterococcus species, 6% (0–12%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 4% (2–6%), Citrobacter species, 4% (95% CI 2–4%), Group B streptococcus, 3% (1–5%), and Enterobacter species, 2% (1–4%). Multidrug resistance proportions of E. coli, Klebsiella species, Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase negative staphylococci, 83% (95% CI 76–91%), 78% (95% CI 66–90%), 89% (95% CI 83–96%), and 78% (95% CI 67–88%), respectively. Conclusion The result of current review revealed the occurrence of substantial bacteriuria among pregnant women in Ethiopia. Resistance among common bacteria (E. coli, Klebsiella species, Staphylococci species) causing UTIs in pregnant women is widespread to commonly used antibiotics. The high rate of drug resistance in turn warrants the need for regular epidemiological surveillance of antibiotic resistance and implementation of an efficient infection control and stewardship program.


Author(s):  
Ulrike Friebe-Hoffmann ◽  
Larissa Dobravsky ◽  
Thomas W. P. Friedl ◽  
Wolfgang Janni ◽  
Alexander J. Knippel ◽  
...  

Abstract Purpose A short fetal femur in prenatal diagnosis might be an indicator for intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), a genetically determined small child (SGA) with or without associated fetal malformations and/or an adverse fetal outcome. Methods 1373 singleton pregnancies with a femoral length < 5th percentile detected between 1999 and 2015 during second-trimester screening in a tertiary prenatal diagnostic center were subjected to a descriptive retrospective analysis with regard to fetal characteristics as well as pregnancy outcome. Results 685 (49.9%) fetuses presented an isolated short femur, while 688 (50.1%) showed additional abnormalities. 293 (42.6%) of those were SGA babies without any malformation, while 395 (57.4%) had one or more severe anomaly of the following organ systems: 157 (11.5%) cardiovascular, 101 (7.4%) musculoskeletal, 82 (6.0%) urogenital, 72 (5.2%) cerebrocephalic, 50 (3.6%) gastrointestinal, and 5 (0.4%) thoracic. 75 (5.5%) of the fetuses showed chromosomal aberrations of which Trisomy 13, 18 and 21 were found in 2, 13 and 27 of the cases, respectively. Fetuses with associated malformations had a significantly lower live birth rate than those without (64.2% vs. 98.1%, p < 0.001); in addition, a higher rate of preterm births 36.6% vs. 11.3%, p < 0.001) and SGA babies (51.4% vs. 30.4%, p < 0.001) were observed in the first collective. Conclusion Diagnosis of a short fetal femur should lead to an extended organ screening; in the case of associated abnormalities, additional genetic testing has to be offered, as well as intensified pregnancy monitoring in pregnancies at risk for IUGR and/or preterm birth.


Author(s):  
Lisa K. Nees ◽  
Sabine Heublein ◽  
Sahra Steinmacher ◽  
Ingolf Juhasz-Böss ◽  
Sara Brucker ◽  
...  

AbstractEndometrial hyperplasia (EH) is the precursor lesion for endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium (EC), which represents the most common malignancy of the female reproductive tract in industrialized countries. The most important risk factor for the development of EH is chronic exposure to unopposed estrogen. Histopathologically, EH can be classified into EH without atypia (benign EH) and atypical EH/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (EIN). Clinical management ranges from surveillance or progestin therapy through to hysterectomy, depending on the risk of progression to or concomitant EC and the patient´s desire to preserve fertility. Multiple studies support the efficacy of progestins in treating both benign and atypical EH. This review summarizes the evidence base regarding risk factors and management of EH. Additionally, we performed a systematic literature search of the databases PubMed and Cochrane Controlled Trials register for studies analyzing the efficacy of progestin treatment in women with EH.


Author(s):  
Nir Meller ◽  
Raanan Meyer ◽  
Adiel Cohen ◽  
Eiman Abu-Bandora ◽  
Daphna Amitai Komem ◽  
...  

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