saimiri sciureus
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PLoS ONE ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 16 (10) ◽  
pp. e0259504
Author(s):  
Délia Cristina Figueira Aguiar ◽  
Washington Luiz Assunção Pereira ◽  
Gyselly de Cássia Bastos de Matos ◽  
Klena Sarges Marruaz da Silva ◽  
Rosane do Socorro Pompeu de Loiola ◽  
...  

2021 ◽  
Vol 12 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Kevin Wittwer ◽  
Danielle E. Anderson ◽  
Kristin Pfeffermann ◽  
Robert M. Cox ◽  
Josef D. Wolf ◽  
...  

AbstractMeasles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious pathogen that enters the human host via the respiratory route. Besides acute pathologies including fever, cough and the characteristic measles rash, the infection of lymphocytes leads to substantial immunosuppression that can exacerbate the outcome of infections with additional pathogens. Despite the availability of effective vaccine prophylaxis, measles outbreaks continue to occur worldwide. We demonstrate that prophylactic and post-exposure therapeutic treatment with an orally bioavailable small-molecule polymerase inhibitor, ERDRP-0519, prevents measles disease in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). Treatment initiation at the onset of clinical signs reduced virus shedding, which may support outbreak control. Results show that this clinical candidate has the potential to alleviate clinical measles and augment measles virus eradication.


2021 ◽  
Vol 68 (2) ◽  
pp. 181-184
Author(s):  
Onur DEMİR ◽  
Özgen ÖZDEMİR ◽  
Asiye KOÇAK ◽  
Zeynel ARSLAN ◽  
Sedat SEVİN

2020 ◽  
pp. 030098582097175
Author(s):  
Shannon Kirejczyk ◽  
Christopher Pinelli ◽  
Olga Gonzalez ◽  
Shyamesh Kumar ◽  
Edward Dick ◽  
...  

Given their genetic and anatomic similarities to humans, nonhuman primates (NHPs) may serve as animal models for urogenital diseases of humans. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of spontaneous urogenital lesions occurring over a 30-year period at the Yerkes and Southwest National Primate Research Centers and to compare and contrast lesions occurring in Old World versus New World primates. Lesions occurring in the chimpanzee ( Pan troglodytes), baboon ( Papio spp.), rhesus macaque ( Macaca mulatta), cynomolgus macaque ( Macaca fascicularis), pig-tailed macaque ( Macaca nemestrina), sooty mangabey ( Cercocebus atys), common marmoset ( Callithrix jacchus), cotton-top tamarin ( Sanguinus oedipus), and squirrel monkey ( Saimiri sciureus) are discussed. The most common lesions of the kidney were medullary amyloidosis, renal cysts, renal tubular degeneration, glomerulonephritis or glomerulopathy, nephritis, nephrocalcinosis, pyelonephritis, and hydronephrosis. Specific causes of renal tubular disease included pigmentary nephrosis and tubular lipidosis. Renal tumors, including renal adenoma and carcinoma, lymphoma, and nephroblastoma, were infrequent diagnoses in all species. Endometriosis was the most frequently diagnosed lesion of the female genital tract. Of the animals examined in this study, it was most frequent in Old World primates. Leiomyoma was the most common uterine tumor. Granulosa cell tumor was the most frequently observed neoplasm of the ovaries, followed by teratoma. Of animals included in the study, most ovarian tumors occurred in baboons. Neoplasms of the male reproductive tract included interstitial cell tumor, seminoma, penile squamous cell carcinoma, penile papilloma, and histiocytoma. In New World monkeys, renal lesions were reported more frequently than genital lesions.


PLoS ONE ◽  
2020 ◽  
Vol 15 (11) ◽  
pp. e0241487
Author(s):  
Délia Cristina Figueira Aguiar ◽  
Washington Luiz Assunção Pereira ◽  
Gyselly de Cássia Bastos de Matos ◽  
Klena Sarges Marruaz da Silva ◽  
Rosane do Socorro Pompeu de Loiola ◽  
...  

ABH antigens are histo-antigens, but were first described on the surface of human erythrocytes. They are found in those cells only in great apes and humans, while in more primitive animals they are found in tissues and body fluids. ABH antigens are mainly distributed in tissues that are in contact with the external environment and may serve as ligands for pathogens in tissues or block their connection. Description of the distribution of these molecules in non-human primate tissues is restricted to a few tissues and species. This paper describes the expression of human A, B and H type antigens in different organs from four species of New World Primates, obtained from the Centro Nacional de Primatas, as well as comparing that expression with what has been described for humans. In this study, although the tissue description of the antigens is similar to the genetic model for humans, some differences in expression between some organs from those species and those of humans were found. The differences occurred mainly in endodermal organs that have secretory functions and are probably under the control of the human-type FUT-2 enzyme. In the mesodermal-origin organs there was a reduction or absence of A and B antigen marking, particularly in the H precursor substance, indicating that those organs are under the control of the human-type FUT-1 enzyme. These findings have demonstrated that there is similar ABH antigen reactivity in tissue distribution between the species, although there are some species-specific cases.


2020 ◽  
Vol 6 (9) ◽  
Author(s):  
Donna L. Rogers ◽  
Julio C. Ruiz ◽  
Wallace B. Baze ◽  
Gloria B. McClure ◽  
Carolyn Smith ◽  
...  

Adenoviruses are a frequent cause of acute upper respiratory tract infections that can also cause disseminated disease in immunosuppressed patients. We identified a novel adenovirus, squirrel monkey adenovirus 1 (SqMAdV-1), as the cause of fatal infection in an immunocompromised squirrel monkey (Saimiri boliviensis) at the Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research (KCCMR). Sequencing of SqMAdV-1 revealed that it is most closely related (80.4 % pairwise nucleotide identity) to the titi monkey (Plecturocebus cupreus) adenovirus (TMAdV). Although identified in the titi monkey, TMAdV is highly lethal in these monkeys, and they are not thought to be the natural host. While SqMAdV-1 is similar to other primate adenoviruses in size and genomic characteristics, a nucleotide polymorphism at the expected stop codon of the DNA polymerase gene results in a 126 amino acid extension at the carboxy terminus, a feature not previously observed among other primate adenoviruses. PCR testing and partial sequencing of 95 archived faecal samples from other squirrel monkeys (Saimiri boliviensis and Saimiri sciureus) housed at the KCCMR revealed the presence of three distinct, and apparently endemic species of adenoviruses. A grouping of ten squirrel monkey adenovirus variants has high similarity to SqMAdV-1. A single adenovirus variant (designated SqMAdV-3), detected in five monkeys, has similarity to tufted capuchin (Sapajus apella) adenoviruses. The largest group of adenovirus variants detected (designated SqMAdV-2.0–2.16) has very high similarity (93–99 %) to the TMAdV, suggesting that squirrel monkeys may be the natural host of the TMAdV.


Primates ◽  
2020 ◽  
Vol 61 (5) ◽  
pp. 717-727
Author(s):  
Benoit Bucher ◽  
Maxime Bourgeois ◽  
James R. Anderson ◽  
Hika Kuroshima ◽  
Kazuo Fujita

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