systemic racism
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2022 ◽  
Vol 18 (1) ◽  
pp. 75-88 ◽  
Author(s):  
Jennifer Bergmark ◽  
Stephanie H. Danker

Two university art educators engaged in research to explore issues of race and representation through examining the histories of race-based mascots at their two Midwestern US universities. Collaborative inquiry allowed for reflective practice, dialogue and critical listening as part of extended conversations to examine the stereotyping of Indigenous1 culture and images with students and community members. Issues of race, representation, stereotyping and systemic racism were explored with university art education students, faculty and Myaamia citizens (Miami Tribe of Oklahoma) in a workshop setting. Conversations within the workshop aimed to extend understandings about the cultural and artistic traditions of the Miami Tribe and strengthen cross-institutional and community relationships. Post-workshop analysis of the collaborators’ correspondences was analysed to reveal three themes: relationships and voice, representation and acknowledgement. Reconciliation is discussed as ongoing and mutual effort involving a continuous process of critical reflection, listening and dialogue necessary for building relationships and to learn directly from Indigenous peoples.


2022 ◽  
Author(s):  
Jennifer Sansalone

This major research paper outlines the relationship between minorities in Canada and their experience with wrongful convictions, highlighting the cases of Mi'Kmaq male Donald Marshall Junior and Black male Leighton Hay. It highlights systemic racism embedded in the criminal justice system, the communities where both men resided in. It highlights the differences in experiences by both Indigenous and Black people and similarities in their negative experience with the justice system through their wrongful conviction, due to their status as minorities.


2022 ◽  
Author(s):  
Jennifer Sansalone

This major research paper outlines the relationship between minorities in Canada and their experience with wrongful convictions, highlighting the cases of Mi'Kmaq male Donald Marshall Junior and Black male Leighton Hay. It highlights systemic racism embedded in the criminal justice system, the communities where both men resided in. It highlights the differences in experiences by both Indigenous and Black people and similarities in their negative experience with the justice system through their wrongful conviction, due to their status as minorities.


2022 ◽  
Author(s):  
Angela Cooper Brathwaite ◽  
Dania Versailles ◽  
Daria Juüdi‐Hope ◽  
Maurice Coppin ◽  
Keisha Jefferies ◽  
...  
Keyword(s):  

2022 ◽  
Vol 1 ◽  
Author(s):  
Kenya Beard ◽  
◽  
Iheoma Iruka ◽  
Danielle Laraque-Arena ◽  
Velma McBride Murry ◽  
...  

Author(s):  
Matthew Jay Lyons ◽  
Senaida Fernandez Poole ◽  
Ross C. Brownson ◽  
Rodney Lyn

Racial disparities in breast cancer present a vexing and complex challenge for public health. A diverse array of factors contributes to disparities in breast cancer incidence and outcomes, and, thus far, efforts to improve racial equity have yielded mixed results. Systems theory offers a model that is well-suited to addressing complex issues. In particular, the concept of a systemic leverage point offers a clue that may assist researchers, policymakers, and interventionists in formulating innovative and comprehensive approaches to eliminating racial disparities in breast cancer. Naming systemic racism as a fundamental cause of disparities, we use systems theory to identify residential segregation as a key leverage point and a driver of racial inequities across the social, economic, and environmental determinants of health. We call on researchers, policymakers, and interventionists to use a systems-informed, community-based participatory approach, aimed at harnessing the power of place, to engage directly with community stakeholders in coordinating efforts to prevent breast cancer, and work toward eliminating disparities in communities of color.


2022 ◽  
pp. 004005992110462
Author(s):  
Elizabeth A. Harkins Monaco ◽  
Lynn Stansberry Brusnahan ◽  
Marcus Fuller

Racism in the United States has risen to the forefront of public awareness through the national outrage, grief, and terrible injustice and bias that continues to dictate the fates of individuals in our communities of color. Centuries of systemic racism require our organization to publish innovative evidence-based practices for use in a wide variety of educational programs and settings around topics related to racial and cultural practices. This special edition of Teaching Exceptional Children (TEC) emphasizes racially and culturally competent and sustaining practices when working with students with disabilities who also experience another social identity.


2022 ◽  
pp. 000841742110666
Author(s):  
Brenda L. Beagan ◽  
Kaitlin R. Sibbald ◽  
Stephanie R. Bizzeth ◽  
Tara M. Pride

Background. Research on racism within occupational therapy is scant, though there are hints that racialized therapists struggle. Purpose. This paper examines experiences of racism in occupational therapy, including coping strategies and resistance. Method. Ten therapists from racialized groups (not including Indigenous peoples) were recruited for cross-Canada, in-person or telephone interviews. Transcripts were coded and inductively analysed, with data thematically organized by types of racism and responses. Findings. Interpersonal racism involving clients, students, colleagues and managers is supported by institutional racism when incidents of racism are met with inaction, and racialized therapists are rarely in leadership roles. Structural racism means the experiences of racialized people are negated within the profession. Cognitive sense-making becomes a key coping strategy, especially when resistance is costly. Implications. Peer supports and community building among racialized therapists may be beneficial, but dismantling structures of racism demands interrogating how whiteness is built into business-as-usual in occupational therapy.


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