Coastal Seawater
Recently Published Documents


TOTAL DOCUMENTS

309
(FIVE YEARS 95)

H-INDEX

41
(FIVE YEARS 10)

Author(s):  
Soo-Yeon Choi ◽  
Ji-Sung Oh ◽  
Dong-Hyun Roh

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, yellow-pigmented and non-motile rod-shaped bacterium, designated as GrpM-11T, was isolated from coastal seawater collected from the East Sea, Republic of Korea. Strain GrpM-11T could grow at 10–40 °C (optimum, 35 °C), at pH 5.5–9.5 (optimum, pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0–8 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 3–4 %). Cells hydrolysed aesculin, gelatin and casein, but could not reduce nitrate to nitrite. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that this strain formed a distinct phylogenic lineage with Parasphingopyxis algicola ATAX6-5T (96.2 % sequence identity) and Parasphingopyxis lamellibrachiae DSM 26725T (96.2 % identity) and belonged to the genus Parasphingopyxis . The predominant isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-10. The polar lipid profile of strain GrpM-11T consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, sphingoglycolipid and three unknown glycolipids. Cellular fatty acid analysis indicated that summed feature 8 (C18 : 1 ω7c and/or C18 : 1 ω6c; 42.8 %), C16 : 0 (19.0 %), C18 : 1 ω7c 11-methyl (13.3 %) and C18 : 1 ω7c (8.0 %) were the major fatty acids. The DNA G+C content of strain GrpM-11T was 63.7 mol%. Through whole genome sequence comparisons, the digital DNA–DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity values between strain GrpM-11T and two species of the genus Parasphingopyxis were revealed to be in the ranges of 19.0–22.0 % and 76.3–79.7 %, respectively. Based on the results of polyphasic analysis, strain GrpM-11T represents a novel species of the genus Parasphingopyxis , for which the name Parasphingopyxis marina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GrpM-11T (KCCM 43343T=JCM 34665T).


2021 ◽  
pp. 100839
Author(s):  
Xiaotian Zuo ◽  
Wei Xu ◽  
Shiping Wei ◽  
Hans-Peter Grossart ◽  
Yuanhao Gao ◽  
...  

Processes ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 9 (8) ◽  
pp. 1399
Author(s):  
Abdelrahman S. Zaky ◽  
Claudia E. Carter ◽  
Fanran Meng ◽  
Christopher E. French

Bioethanol has many environmental and practical benefits as a transportation fuel. It is one of the best alternatives to replace fossil fuels due to its liquid nature, which is similar to the gasoline and diesel fuels traditionally used in transportation. In addition, bioethanol production technology has the capacity for negative carbon emissions, which is vital for solving the current global warming dilemma. However, conventional bioethanol production takes place based on an inland site and relies on freshwater and edible crops (or land suitable for edible crop production) for production, which has led to the food vs. fuel debate. Establishing a coastal marine biorefinery (CMB) system for bioethanol production that is based on coastal sites and relies on marine resources (seawater, marine biomass and marine yeast) could be the ultimate solution. In this paper, we aim to evaluate the environmental impact of using seawater for bioethanol production at coastal locations as a step toward the evaluation of a CMB system. Hence, a life cycle assessment for bioethanol production was conducted using the proposed scenario, named Coastal Seawater, and compared to the conventional scenario, named Inland Freshwater (IF). The impact of each scenario in relation to climate change, water depletion, land use and fossil depletion was studied for comparison. The Coastal Seawater scenario demonstrated an improvement upon the conventional scenario in all the selected impact categories. In particular, the use of seawater in the process had a significant effect on water depletion, showing an impact reduction of 31.2%. Furthermore, reductions were demonstrated in natural land transformation, climate change and fossil depletion of 5.5%, 3.5% and 4.2%, respectively. This indicates the positive impact of using seawater and coastal locations for bioethanol production and encourages research to investigate the CMB system.


2021 ◽  
Vol 10 (2) ◽  
pp. 44-51
Author(s):  
Tung Nguyen Dinh ◽  
Sieu Le Nhu ◽  
Phuc Nguyen Van ◽  
Phu Nguyen Van ◽  
Khoa Tran Dinh ◽  
...  

Radioactivities of some natural (Ra-226, Th-232, U-238, Po-210) and artificial (Cs-137, Sr-90 and Pu-239,240) radionuclides in coastal seawater at monitoring points of Ninh Thuan, Ba Ria - Vung Tau and Ca Mau provinces were analyzed quarterly in the year of 2018. Radioactivities of Ra-226, Th-232, U-238, and Cs-137 had been determined by simultaneous precipitation method and measured on low-level background gamma spectrometer; the radioactivities of Po-210 and Pu- 239,240 had been analyzed by radiochemical separation method and measured on alpha spectrometer; the radioactivity of Sr-90 had been analyzed by radiochemical separation method and measured on low-level background beta counting system. The ranges of radioactivities of Ra-226, Th-232, U-238, Po-210, Cs-137, Sr-90, and Pu-239,240 were 2.71 ÷ 15.91, 3.45 ÷ 35.93, 3.02 ÷ 21.47, 1.51÷ 6.74, 0.88 ÷ 1.68, 1.08 ÷ 1.86 and 0.0026 ÷ 0.0062 mBq/L, with the average values of 6.37, 12.67, 8.34, 3.29, 1.36, 1.46 and 0.0043 mBq/L, respectively. The results shown that the radioactivities of theabove-mentioned radionuclides varied between the seawaters at Ninh Thuan, Ba Ria - Vung Tau and Ca Mau seawater. Additionally, physicochemical parameters in seawater were also surveyed to assess their impact on the fluctuations of the above radionuclides.


Author(s):  
Abdelrahman S. Zaky ◽  
Claudia E. Carter ◽  
Fanran Meng ◽  
Christopher E. French

Bioethanol has many environmental and practical benefits as a transportation fuel. It is one of the best alternatives to replace fossil fuels due to its liquid nature which is similar to petrol and diesel fuels traditionally used in transportation. In addition, bioethanol production technology has the capacity for negative carbon emissions which is vital for solving the current global warming dilemma. However, conventional bioethanol production takes place based on an inland site and relies on freshwater and edible crops (or land suitable for edible crop production) for production, which has led to the food vs fuel debate. Establishing a coastal marine biorefinery (CMB) system for bioethanol production that is based on coastal sites and relies on marine resources (seawater, marine biomass and marine yeast) could be the ultimate solution. In this paper, we aim to evaluate the environmental impact of using seawater for bioethanol production at coastal locations as a step towards the evaluation of a CMB system. Hence, a life cycle assessment for bioethanol production was conducted using the proposed scenario named Coastal-Seawater and compared to the conventional scenario, named Inland-Freshwater (IF). The impact of each scenario in relation to climate change, water depletion, land use and fossil depletion was studied for comparison. The coastal-seawater scenario demonstrated an improvement upon the conventional scenario in all the selected impact categories. In particular, the use of seawater in the process had a significant effect on water depletion showing an impact reduction of 31.2%. Furthermore, reductions are demonstrated in natural land transformation, climate change and fossil depletion of 5.5%, 3.5% and 4.2% respectively. This indicates the positive impact of using seawater and coastal locations for bioethanol production and encourages research to investigate the CMB system.


Author(s):  
Abdelrahman S. Zaky ◽  
Claudia E. Carter ◽  
Fanran Meng ◽  
Christopher E. French

Bioethanol has many environmental and practical benefits as a transportation fuel. It is one of the best alternatives to replace fossil fuels due to its liquid nature which is similar to petrol and diesel fuels traditionally used in transportation. In addition, bioethanol production technology has the capacity for negative carbon emissions which is vital for solving the current global warming dilemma. However, conventional bioethanol production takes place based on an inland site and relies on freshwater and edible crops (or land suitable for edible crop production) for production, which has led to the food vs fuel debate. Establishing a coastal marine biorefinery (CMB) system for bioethanol production that is based on coastal sites and relies on marine resources (seawater, marine biomass and marine yeast) could be the ultimate solution. In this paper, we aim to evaluate the environmental impact of using seawater for bioethanol production at coastal locations as a step towards the evaluation of a CMB system. Hence, a life cycle assessment for bioethanol production was conducted using the proposed scenario named Coastal-Seawater and compared to the conventional scenario, named Inland-Freshwater (IF). The impact of each scenario in relation to climate change, water depletion, land use and fossil depletion was studied for comparison. The coastal-seawater scenario demonstrated an improvement upon the conventional scenario in all the selected impact categories. In particular, the use of seawater in the process had a significant effect on water depletion showing an impact reduction of 31.2%. Furthermore, reductions are demonstrated in natural land transformation, climate change and fossil depletion of 5.5%, 3.5% and 4.2% respectively. This indicates the positive impact of using seawater and coastal locations for bioethanol production and encourages research to investigate the CMB system.


Author(s):  
Mary W. Carrano ◽  
Carl J. Carrano ◽  
Mathew S. Edwards ◽  
Hanan Al-Adilah ◽  
Yann Fontana ◽  
...  

2021 ◽  
Vol 10 (28) ◽  
Author(s):  
Yuki Sato-Takabe ◽  
Yu Nakajima ◽  
Yuya Tsukamoto ◽  
Koji Hamasaki ◽  
Takuhei Shiozaki

Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Roseobacter sp. strain OBYS 0001, isolated from coastal seawater in Ostuchi Bay, Japan. This genome sequence could be useful for our understanding of the variation in photosynthesis-related genes among aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs.


Sign in / Sign up

Export Citation Format

Share Document