Line Managers
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2021 ◽  
Vol 21 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
E. Björk Brämberg ◽  
B. Arapovic-Johansson ◽  
U. Bültmann ◽  
P. Svedberg ◽  
G. Bergström

Abstract Background Common mental disorders are highly prevalent in the working population, affecting about 1 in 5 persons in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. About 30% of those affected have a first period of sick leave. Despite several attempts to reduce the risk of sick leave among employees with common mental disorders, there is a lack of knowledge about effective, preventive interventions which aim to reduce such risks. This protocol describes the design of a study to evaluate the effectiveness of a problem-solving intervention delivered by first-line managers to employees with common mental disorders on the prevention of sick leave during the 12-month follow-up. Methods/design The study applies a two-armed cluster-randomized trial design of a problem-solving intervention conducted in private-sector companies. First-line managers are randomized into intervention- or control groups by computer-generated random numbers, allocation ratio 1:1. Employees are eligible if at risk for future sick leave due to common mental disorders. These are identified by self-reported psychological health measured by the General Health Questionnaire 12-item, cut-off ≥3, or a positive answer to risk of sick leave. The intervention is based on problem-solving principles. It involves the training of the first-line managers who then deliver the intervention to employees identified at risk of sick leave. First-line managers in the control group receives a lecture. Primary outcome is number of registered days of sick leave due to common mental disorders during the 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes are general health, psychological symptoms, work performance, work ability and psychosocial work environment. A process evaluation will examine the intervention’s reach, fidelity, dose delivered, dose received, satisfaction and context. Research assistants managing the screening procedure, outcome assessors and employees are blinded to randomization and allocation. Discussion The study includes analyses of the intervention’s effectiveness and an alongside process evaluation. Methodological strengths and limitations, for example the risk of selection bias, attrition and risk of contamination are discussed. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT04975750 Date of registration: 08/16/2021.


2021 ◽  
Vol 4 (3) ◽  
Author(s):  
Niyi Israel Akeke ◽  
◽  
Adenike Rita Akeke ◽  
Ayodeji Muyideen Awolaj ◽  
Mathew Olufemi Oyebanji

The study explores the potential influences of strategic orientation constructs of entrepreneurial, market and technology orientations on telecommunication firms’ performance using data obtained through structured questionnaires from 57 line managers and 300 customers of these firms. The data collected were subjected to the structural equation modeling technique. The results revealed that strategic orientation has a positive significant relationship with firm performance. Specifically, it showed that only technology orientation has a significant influence on telecommunication firms’ performance. The study contributes to the understanding of the rationale behind which set of strategic orientations should be implemented for improved level of performance in the telecommunication sector.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Niyi Israel Akeke ◽  
Adenike Rita Akeke ◽  
Ayodeji Muyideen Awolaja ◽  
Mathew Olufemi Oyebanji

The study explores the potential influences of strategic orientation constructs of entrepreneurial, market and technology orientations on telecommunication firms’ performance using data obtained through structured questionnaires from 57 line managers and 300 customers of these firms. The data collected were subjected to the structural equation modeling technique. The results revealed that strategic orientation has a positive significant relationship with firm performance. Specifically, it showed that only technology orientation has a significant influence on telecommunication firms’ performance. The study contributes to the understanding of the rationale behind which set of strategic orientations should be implemented for improved level of performance in the telecommunication sector.


Author(s):  
Fidele Kanyimbu Mukinda ◽  
Sara Van Belle ◽  
Helen Schneider

Background: Accountability for maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH) is a collaborative endeavour and documenting collaboration dynamics may be key to understanding variations in the performance of MNCH services. This study explored the dynamics of collaboration among frontline health professionals participating in two MNCH coordination structures in a rural South African district. It examined the role and position of actors, the nature of their relationships, and the overall structure of the collaborative network in two sub-districts. Methods: Cross-sectional survey using a social network analysis (SNA) methodology of 42 district and sub district actors involved in MNCH coordination structures. Different domains of collaboration (eg, communication, professional support, innovation) were surveyed at key interfaces (district-sub-district, across service delivery levels, and within teams). Results: The overall network structure reflected a predominantly hierarchical mode of clustering of organisational relationships around hospitals and their referring primary healthcare (PHC) facilities. Clusters were linked through (and dependent on) a combination of district MNCH programme and line managers, identified as central connectors or boundary spanners. Overall network density remained low suggesting potential for strengthening collaborative relationships. Within cluster collaborative patterns (inter-professional and across levels) varied, highlighting the significance of small units in district functioning. Conclusion: SNA provides a mechanism to uncover the nature of relationships and key actors in collaborative dynamics which could point to system strengths and weaknesses. It offers insights on the level of fragmentation within and across small units, and the need to strengthen cohesion and improve collaborative relationships, and ultimately, the delivery of health services.


Author(s):  
Karin Hugelius ◽  
Sara Johansson ◽  
Helena Sjölin

This study aimed to describe experiences of managing mental health and psychosocial activities during the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden. A national survey was answered by a non-probability sample of 340 involved in the psychosocial response. The psychosocial response operations met several challenges, mainly related to the diverse actors involved, lack of competence, and lack of preparations. Less than 80% of the participants had received specific training in the provision of psychosocial support during major incidents. The interventions used varied, and no large-scale interventions were used. The psychosocial response organizations were overwhelmed by the needs of health care staff and failed to meet the needs of patients and family members. An efficient and durable psychosocial response in a long-term crisis requires to be structured, planned and well-integrated into the overall pandemic response. All personnel involved need adequate and specific competence in evidence-based individual and large-scale interventions to provide psychosocial support in significant incidents. By increasing general awareness of mental wellbeing and psychosocial support amongst health professionals and their first-line managers, a more resilient health care system, both in everyday life and during major incidents and disasters, could be facilitated.


2021 ◽  
Vol 35 (9) ◽  
pp. 245-264
Author(s):  
Roy Liff ◽  
Ewa Wikström

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to investigate and theoretically explain how line managers and lower-status experts work together in public health-care organizations. Hence, this study explores how lower-status experts influence line managers' decision-making and task prioritizing in order to guide staff experts' cooperation and performance improvements.Design/methodology/approachThe authors used a qualitative method for data collection and analysis of the experts' and line managers' explanations about their cooperation. A theoretical approach of experts' identity positioning, in terms of differences and similarities, was used in analyzing the interaction between managers and experts.FindingsThis study shows that similarities and differences in positioning acts exist simultaneously. Similarity is constructed by way of strategic and professional alignment with the line managers' core tasks. Differences stem from the distinction between knowledge-grounded skills and professional attributes such as language, analytical tools, and jargon. Lower-status experts need to leave their entrenched positions and match the professional status of line managers in both knowledge aspirations and appearance to reach a respected approach of experts' identity positioning.Originality/valueUnlike many previous studies, this study demonstrates that similarities and differences in positioning acts exist simultaneously.


2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Eyvind Helland ◽  
Marit Christensen ◽  
Siw Tone Innstrand ◽  
Karina Nielsen

PurposeThis paper explores line managers' proactive work behaviors in organizational interventions and ascertains how their management of their middle-levelness by aligning with the intervention, or not, influences their proactive work behaviors.Design/methodology/approachThe authors’ findings are based on thematic analysis of 20 semi-structured interviews of university heads of departments responsible for managing organizational interventions.FindingsThe authors found that line managers engaged in a range of proactive work behaviors to implement the organizational intervention (i.e. “driving proactive behaviors”). Furthermore, line managers tended to engage in driving proactive behaviors when they aligned with the organizational intervention, but not to when unconvinced of the intervention's validity.Practical implicationsThese findings highlight the importance of senior management and HR investing sufficient time and quality in the preparation phase to ensure all actors have a shared understanding of the organizational interventions' validity.Originality/valueThis is the first study to explore line managers' proactive work behaviors to implement an organizational intervention, and how the line managers' management of their middle-levelness influence these proactive work behaviors.


2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Craig Steel ◽  
Zoe Travers ◽  
Lynette Meredith ◽  
Deborah Lee ◽  
Michael Conti ◽  
...  

PurposeThe purpose is to report on the mental health response to the Grenfell incident within the London Fire Brigade (LFB).Design/methodology/approachThe LFB implemented screening for the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at 28 days, 3 months and 6 months for all personnel directly involved in the incident.FindingsThe prevalence of PTSD within frontline personnel was 13.4% at 28 days, falling to 7.6% at 6 months. The LFB's internal Counselling and Wellbeing Service offered treatment to those scoring above the cut-off for PTSD along with accepting self-referral and referrals from line managers and occupational health. There were 139 referrals within the 12-month period following the incident.Research limitations/implicationsThe outcomes for those who engaged in treatment are broadly in line with other studies evaluating post-disaster interventions. Issues for consideration within national guidelines are discussed.Practical implicationsThe screen and treat approach adopted by LFB was shown to be a feasible approach to use within such a scenario.Originality/valueThe current study reports on a screen and treat approach to one of the largest single incidents in the UK in recent years.


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