urban schools
Recently Published Documents


TOTAL DOCUMENTS

1011
(FIVE YEARS 284)

H-INDEX

42
(FIVE YEARS 7)

Author(s):  
Namrata B. Khandagale

‘Assessment of the factors influencing and barriers associated with menstrual hygiene among adolescent girls of selected urban schools in view to develop information booklet.’ Objectives: 1. To assess the factors influencing Incidence of menstrual hygiene among the adolescent girls. 2. To assess the barriers associated with menstrual hygiene among adolescent girls. 3.To find association between the study findings and selected demographic variables. Material and Methods: The research approach adopted in this study is Observational research approach. Non- experimental descriptive research design was used. The sample were selected by Non-probability convenient sampling technique sample size was 100. Results: 1. 75% of the adolescent girls understand menstruation as the physiological process, 9% of them consider it as pathological process, 3% of them consider it as a cause for god and 13% of them don't know what menstruation is about. 2. 73% of the adolescent girls avoid visiting public places during menstruation due to lack of toilet facilities in public area, 14% of them avoid visiting public places because they feel shy to use public toilet and 13% of them avoid using public places due to cultural barriers.


2021 ◽  
pp. 004208592110584
Author(s):  
Nikolett Szelei ◽  
Ana Sofia Pinho ◽  
Luís Tinoca

This study explored ‘cultural diversity’ in urban schools in Portugal by conducting discourse analysis on interviews with school practitioners. Findings show that ‘cultural diversity’ was dominantly anchored in Othering ‘foreigners’ that mainly associated ‘non-native speakers’ to difficulties in integration, participation and teachers’pedagogical work. However, contradicting discourses somewhat resisted Othering by highlighting meaningful differences, all students’ rights, and calling for pedagogical changes. By showing the ambivalences in how students, teachers and pedagogical relationships are viewed, we both alert for an exclusionary conceptualization of ‘cultural diversity’, and question Othering as a fundamentalizing discourse to fully govern ‘cultural diversity’ in schools.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Zawadi Richard Juma

<p>Internationally, scientific literacy is a major goal of science education in the twenty first century. In Tanzania, where there is a widespread lack of public understanding about major health issues, biological literacy is needed so that people can make decisions about the socio-scientific issues that confront them. To that end, the Tanzanian school curriculum aims to connect students’ understandings of Biology to their everyday lives but few studies have been conducted that show whether these aims have been achieved, especially in junior secondary school. This ethnographic case study investigates the ways in which the junior secondary school Biology curriculum in Tanzania supports or constrains the development of biological literacy and how institutional context, particularly as it relates to urban and rural schools, influences the delivery of the Biology curriculum. Teachers’ and Year Four students’ of secondary schools views about school Biology were sought in the course of this study and the issues that emerged were analysed using social constructivist and social constructionist theoretical frameworks. Data were collected through student questionnaires, student focus group interviews, teacher interviews, and classroom observations. The research sites included rural and urban schools, and government and private schools. The findings suggest that the Biology curriculum and the ways it is delivered do not adequately address the students’ needs and therefore is unlikely to enable them to become biologically literate. Rural schools are less well equipped than urban schools to deliver the curriculum and teachers and students face bigger challenges. A key finding was that Tanzanian young people have a strong desire to learn more about reproductive Biology and health issues but these are not prioritised in the current curriculum. In light of these findings, curriculum changes are recommended to provide learning opportunities for students to gain biological knowledge and skills that are relevant to their daily lives.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Zawadi Richard Juma

<p>Internationally, scientific literacy is a major goal of science education in the twenty first century. In Tanzania, where there is a widespread lack of public understanding about major health issues, biological literacy is needed so that people can make decisions about the socio-scientific issues that confront them. To that end, the Tanzanian school curriculum aims to connect students’ understandings of Biology to their everyday lives but few studies have been conducted that show whether these aims have been achieved, especially in junior secondary school. This ethnographic case study investigates the ways in which the junior secondary school Biology curriculum in Tanzania supports or constrains the development of biological literacy and how institutional context, particularly as it relates to urban and rural schools, influences the delivery of the Biology curriculum. Teachers’ and Year Four students’ of secondary schools views about school Biology were sought in the course of this study and the issues that emerged were analysed using social constructivist and social constructionist theoretical frameworks. Data were collected through student questionnaires, student focus group interviews, teacher interviews, and classroom observations. The research sites included rural and urban schools, and government and private schools. The findings suggest that the Biology curriculum and the ways it is delivered do not adequately address the students’ needs and therefore is unlikely to enable them to become biologically literate. Rural schools are less well equipped than urban schools to deliver the curriculum and teachers and students face bigger challenges. A key finding was that Tanzanian young people have a strong desire to learn more about reproductive Biology and health issues but these are not prioritised in the current curriculum. In light of these findings, curriculum changes are recommended to provide learning opportunities for students to gain biological knowledge and skills that are relevant to their daily lives.</p>


2021 ◽  
pp. 0013161X2110519
Author(s):  
David E. DeMatthews ◽  
David S. Knight ◽  
Jinseok Shin

Purpose: Principals are critical to school improvement and play a vital role in creating inclusive and high-performing schools. Yet, approximately one in five principals leave their school each year, and turnover is higher in schools that serve low-income students of color. Relatedly, high rates of teacher turnover exacerbate challenges associated with unstable learning environments. Our study examines the extent to which principal turnover influences teacher turnover. We build on past work by exploring how the relationship between teacher and principal turnover differs in urban, high-poverty settings and by examining the effects of chronic principal turnover. Research Methods/Approach: We draw on a student- and employee-level statewide longitudinal dataset from Texas that includes all public K-12 schools from school years 1999–2000 to 2016–17. We estimate teacher-level models with school fixed effects, allowing us to compare teacher turnover in schools leading up to and immediately following a principal exit, to otherwise similar schools that do not experience principal turnover. Findings: Teacher turnover spikes in schools experiencing leadership turnover, and these effects are greater among high-poverty and urban schools, in schools with low average teacher experience, and in schools experiencing chronic principal turnover. Implications: Improving leadership stability, especially in urban schools experiencing chronic principal turnover may be an effective approach to reducing teacher turnover. Principal and teacher turnover and their relationship with each other requires further investigation. The field would benefit from qualitative research that can provide important insights into the individual decisions and organizational processes that contribute to principal turnover.


Author(s):  
Sadhana Shrestha ◽  
Salina Shrestha ◽  
Yuri Ito ◽  
Yuka Kobayashi ◽  
Kei Nishida ◽  
...  

Abstract Menstrual management (MM) facilities in schools are neglected in low- and middle-income countries. We examined the existing MM facilities, identified the deficient, and collected students' ideas in peri-urban schools of Nepal. The schools had basic MM facilities including water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) infrastructures, gender-segregated toilet facilities with taps, dustbins and running water, provision of emergency sanitary pads, etc. Out of 71 students who reported soiling of dresses with menstrual blood as a common problem, 27% went home and did not return in such situation instead of washing off at school. Forty-six per cent of students used washable absorbents, but washing and drying facilities were lacking, and students adapted by using disposable pads at school and washable at home. Out of 126 students, 106 took days off during menstruation in the past three months with an average of 2.6 days by one student. Sixty-one per cent gave the reason as pain and 39% tiredness for taking days off. Healthcare facilities were lacking in schools, hence, lack of these facilities in schools might be contributing to absenteeism. The traditionally advocated list of MM facilities for schools, largely involving WASH facilities, should be updated, including newly identified factors which were also suggested by students.


Sign in / Sign up

Export Citation Format

Share Document