critical care
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10.1142/8656 ◽  
2022 ◽  
Author(s):  
Gary A Silverman ◽  
Jennifer Kloesz ◽  
Abeer Azzuqa ◽  
Beverly Brozanski ◽  
Kalyani Vats
Keyword(s):  

2022 ◽  
Vol 102 (1) ◽  
pp. xiii-xv
Author(s):  
Ronald F. Martin
Keyword(s):  

2022 ◽  
Vol 102 (1) ◽  
pp. xvii-xviii
Author(s):  
Brett H. Waibel

2022 ◽  
Vol 102 (1) ◽  
pp. i
Author(s):  
BRETT H. WAIBEL

2022 ◽  
Vol 44 ◽  
pp. 101245
Author(s):  
Paul D. Sonenthal ◽  
Mulinda Nyirenda ◽  
Noel Kasomekera ◽  
Regan H. Marsh ◽  
Emily B. Wroe ◽  
...  

2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-19
Author(s):  
Kevin John John ◽  
Ajay K Mishra ◽  
Chidambaram Ramasamy ◽  
Anu A George ◽  
Vijairam Selvaraj ◽  
...  

Author(s):  
J. Jeyanathan ◽  
D. Bootland ◽  
A. Al-Rais ◽  
J. Leung ◽  
J. Wijesuriya ◽  
...  

Abstract Background The COVID-19 pandemic has placed exceptional demand on Intensive Care Units, necessitating the critical care transfer of patients on a regional and national scale. Performing these transfers required specialist expertise and involved moving patients over significant distances. Air Ambulance Kent Surrey Sussex created a designated critical care transfer team and was one of the first civilian air ambulances in the United Kingdom to move ventilated COVID-19 patients by air. We describe the practical set up of such a service and the key lessons learned from the first 50 transfers. Methods Retrospective review of air critical care transfer service set up and case review of first 50 transfers. Results We describe key elements of the critical care transfer service, including coordination and activation; case interrogation; workforce; training; equipment; aircraft modifications; human factors and clinical governance. A total of 50 missions are described between 18 December 2020 and 1 February 2021. 94% of the transfer missions were conducted by road. The mean age of these patients was 58 years (29–83). 30 (60%) were male and 20 (40%) were female. The mean total mission cycle (time of referral until the time team declared free at receiving hospital) was 264 min (range 149–440 min). The mean time spent at the referring hospital prior to leaving for the receiving unit was 72 min (31–158). The mean transfer transit time between referring and receiving units was 72 min (9–182). Conclusion Critically ill COVID-19 patients have highly complex medical needs during transport. Critical care transfer of COVID-19-positive patients by civilian HEMS services, including air transfer, can be achieved safely with specific planning, protocols and precautions. Regional planning of COVID-19 critical care transfers is required to optimise the time available of critical care transfer teams.


2022 ◽  
Vol 16 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Arinze Duke George Nwosu ◽  
Edmund Ndudi Ossai ◽  
Fidelis Anayo Onyekwulu ◽  
Adaobi Obianuju Amucheazi ◽  
Richard Ewah ◽  
...  

Abstract Background Tracheal tubes are routinely used during anaesthesia and in the intensive care unit. Subjective monitoring of cuff pressures have been reported to produce consistently inappropriate cuffs pressures, with attendant morbidity. But this practice of unsafe care remains widespread. With the proliferation of intensive care units in Nigeria and increasing access to surgery, morbidity relating to improper tracheal cuff pressure may assume a greater toll. We aimed to evaluate current knowledge and practice of tracheal cuff pressure monitoring among anaesthesia and critical care providers in Nigeria. Methods This was a multicenter cross-sectional study conducted from March 18 to April 30, 2021. The first part (A) was conducted at 4 tertiary referral hospitals in Nigeria by means of a self-administered questionnaire on the various cadre of anaesthesia and critical care providers. The second part (B) was a nation-wide telephone survey of anaesthesia faculty fellows affiliated to 13 tertiary hospitals in Nigeria, selected by stratified random sampling. Results Only 3.1% (6/196) of the care providers admitted having ever used a tracheal cuff manometer, while 31.1% knew the recommended tracheal cuff pressure. The nationwide telephone survey of anaesthesia faculty fellows revealed that tracheal cuff manometer is neither available, nor has it ever been used in any of the 13 tertiary hospitals surveyed. The ‘Pilot balloon palpation method’ and ‘fixed volume of air from a syringe’ were the most commonly utilized method of cuff pressure estimation by the care providers, at 64.3% and 28.1% respectively in part A survey (84.6% and 15.4% respectively, in the part B survey). Conclusion The use of tracheal cuff manometer is very limited among the care providers surveyed in this study. Knowledge regarding tracheal cuff management among the providers is adjudged to be fair, despite the poor practice and unsafe care.


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