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Author(s):  
Kaneeka Vidanage ◽  
Noor Maizura Mohamad Noor ◽  
Rosmayati Mohemad ◽  
Zuriana Abu Bakar

Ontologies are domain-specific conceptualizations that are both human and machine-readable. Due to this remarkable attribute of ontologies, its applications are not limited to computing domains. Banking, medicine, agriculture, and law are a few of the non-computing domains, where ontologies are being used very effectively. When creating ontologies for non-computing domains, involvement of the non-computing domain specialists like bankers, lawyers, farmers become very vital. Hence, they are not semantic specialists, particularly designed visualization assistance is required for the ontology schema verifications and sense-making. Existing visualization methods are not fine-tuned for non-technical domain specialists and there are lots of complexities. In this research, a novel algorithm capable of generating domain specialists’ friendlier visualization canvas has been explored. This proposed algorithm and the visualization canvas has been tested for three different domains and overall success of 85% has been yielded.


2022 ◽  
Vol 31 (2) ◽  
pp. 1-32
Author(s):  
Luca Ardito ◽  
Andrea Bottino ◽  
Riccardo Coppola ◽  
Fabrizio Lamberti ◽  
Francesco Manigrasso ◽  
...  

In automated Visual GUI Testing (VGT) for Android devices, the available tools often suffer from low robustness to mobile fragmentation, leading to incorrect results when running the same tests on different devices. To soften these issues, we evaluate two feature matching-based approaches for widget detection in VGT scripts, which use, respectively, the complete full-screen snapshot of the application ( Fullscreen ) and the cropped images of its widgets ( Cropped ) as visual locators to match on emulated devices. Our analysis includes validating the portability of different feature-based visual locators over various apps and devices and evaluating their robustness in terms of cross-device portability and correctly executed interactions. We assessed our results through a comparison with two state-of-the-art tools, EyeAutomate and Sikuli. Despite a limited increase in the computational burden, our Fullscreen approach outperformed state-of-the-art tools in terms of correctly identified locators across a wide range of devices and led to a 30% increase in passing tests. Our work shows that VGT tools’ dependability can be improved by bridging the testing and computer vision communities. This connection enables the design of algorithms targeted to domain-specific needs and thus inherently more usable and robust.


2022 ◽  
Vol 15 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-27
Author(s):  
Yun Zhou ◽  
Pongstorn Maidee ◽  
Chris Lavin ◽  
Alireza Kaviani ◽  
Dirk Stroobandt

One of the key obstacles to pervasive deployment of FPGA accelerators in data centers is their cumbersome programming model. Open source tooling is suggested as a way to develop alternative EDA tools to remedy this issue. Open source FPGA CAD tools have traditionally targeted academic hypothetical architectures, making them impractical for commercial devices. Recently, there have been efforts to develop open source back-end tools targeting commercial devices. These tools claim to follow an alternate data-driven approach that allows them to be more adaptable to the domain requirements such as faster compile time. In this paper, we present RWRoute, the first open source timing-driven router for UltraScale+ devices. RWRoute is built on the RapidWright framework and includes the essential and pragmatic features found in commercial FPGA routers that are often missing from open source tools. Another valuable contribution of this work is an open-source lightweight timing model with high fidelity timing approximations. By leveraging a combination of architectural knowledge, repeating patterns, and extensive analysis of Vivado timing reports, we obtain a slightly pessimistic, lumped delay model within 2% average accuracy of Vivado for UltraScale+ devices. Compared to Vivado, RWRoute results in a 4.9× compile time improvement at the expense of 10% Quality of Results (QoR) loss for 665 synthetic and six real designs. A main benefit of our router is enabling fast partial routing at the back-end of a domain-specific flow. Our initial results indicate that more than 9× compile time improvement is achievable for partial routing. The results of this paper show how such a router can be beneficial for a low touch flow to reduce dependency on commercial tools.


2022 ◽  
Vol 22 (2) ◽  
pp. 1-27
Author(s):  
Rina P. Y. Lai

Computational Thinking (CT ), entailing both domain-general and domain-specific skills, is a competency fundamental to computing education and beyond. However, as a cross-domain competency, appropriate assessment design and method remain equivocal. Indeed, the majority of the existing assessments have a predominant focus on measuring programming proficiency and neglecting other contexts in which CT can also be manifested. To broaden the promotion and practice of CT, it is necessary to integrate diverse problem types and item formats using a competency-based assessment method to measure CT. Taking a psychometric approach, this article evaluates a novel computer-based assessment of CT competency, Computational Thinking Challenge. The assessment was administered to 119 British upper secondary school students ( M = 16.11; SD = 1.19) with a range of prior programming experiences. Results from several reliability analyses, a convergent validity analysis, and a Rasch analysis, provided evidence to support the quality of the assessment. Taken together, the study demonstrated the feasibility to expand from traditional assessment methods to integrating multiple contexts, problem types, and item formats in measuring CT competency in a comprehensive manner.


2023 ◽  
Vol 55 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-36
Author(s):  
Junjun Jiang ◽  
Chenyang Wang ◽  
Xianming Liu ◽  
Jiayi Ma

Face super-resolution (FSR), also known as face hallucination, which is aimed at enhancing the resolution of low-resolution (LR) face images to generate high-resolution face images, is a domain-specific image super-resolution problem. Recently, FSR has received considerable attention and witnessed dazzling advances with the development of deep learning techniques. To date, few summaries of the studies on the deep learning-based FSR are available. In this survey, we present a comprehensive review of deep learning-based FSR methods in a systematic manner. First, we summarize the problem formulation of FSR and introduce popular assessment metrics and loss functions. Second, we elaborate on the facial characteristics and popular datasets used in FSR. Third, we roughly categorize existing methods according to the utilization of facial characteristics. In each category, we start with a general description of design principles, present an overview of representative approaches, and then discuss the pros and cons among them. Fourth, we evaluate the performance of some state-of-the-art methods. Fifth, joint FSR and other tasks, and FSR-related applications are roughly introduced. Finally, we envision the prospects of further technological advancement in this field.


The permanent acquisition of the technical environment state and the ability to react to changes in this environment as well as to adapt to it are nowadays crucial for any information system. In this article, the authors present a well-defined model to guarantee in a simple way the design and the realization of adaptive information systems. This model is based on the Unified Modeling Language (UML) which is a widely known modeling standard. Its coverage is limited to bringing out the graded parties in the design of adaptive information systems. A future definition of a metamodel less related to UML language is therefore possible. The authors also present a code generator based on a model transformation technique. This generator allows you to partially produce domain-specific code as needed. A more complete code generator will come to ensure automatic generation of the code.


The permanent acquisition of the technical environment state and the ability to react to changes in this environment as well as to adapt to it are nowadays crucial for any information system. In this article, the authors present a well-defined model to guarantee in a simple way the design and the realization of adaptive information systems. This model is based on the Unified Modeling Language (UML) which is a widely known modeling standard. Its coverage is limited to bringing out the graded parties in the design of adaptive information systems. A future definition of a metamodel less related to UML language is therefore possible. The authors also present a code generator based on a model transformation technique. This generator allows you to partially produce domain-specific code as needed. A more complete code generator will come to ensure automatic generation of the code.


2022 ◽  
Vol 16 (4) ◽  
pp. 1-30
Author(s):  
Muhammad Abulaish ◽  
Mohd Fazil ◽  
Mohammed J. Zaki

Domain-specific keyword extraction is a vital task in the field of text mining. There are various research tasks, such as spam e-mail classification, abusive language detection, sentiment analysis, and emotion mining, where a set of domain-specific keywords (aka lexicon) is highly effective. Existing works for keyword extraction list all keywords rather than domain-specific keywords from a document corpus. Moreover, most of the existing approaches perform well on formal document corpuses but fail on noisy and informal user-generated content in online social media. In this article, we present a hybrid approach by jointly modeling the local and global contextual semantics of words, utilizing the strength of distributional word representation and contrasting-domain corpus for domain-specific keyword extraction. Starting with a seed set of a few domain-specific keywords, we model the text corpus as a weighted word-graph. In this graph, the initial weight of a node (word) represents its semantic association with the target domain calculated as a linear combination of three semantic association metrics, and the weight of an edge connecting a pair of nodes represents the co-occurrence count of the respective words. Thereafter, a modified PageRank method is applied to the word-graph to identify the most relevant words for expanding the initial set of domain-specific keywords. We evaluate our method over both formal and informal text corpuses (comprising six datasets), and show that it performs significantly better in comparison to state-of-the-art methods. Furthermore, we generalize our approach to handle the language-agnostic case, and show that it outperforms existing language-agnostic approaches.


2022 ◽  
Vol 54 (8) ◽  
pp. 1-36
Author(s):  
Shubhra Kanti Karmaker (“Santu”) ◽  
Md. Mahadi Hassan ◽  
Micah J. Smith ◽  
Lei Xu ◽  
Chengxiang Zhai ◽  
...  

As big data becomes ubiquitous across domains, and more and more stakeholders aspire to make the most of their data, demand for machine learning tools has spurred researchers to explore the possibilities of automated machine learning (AutoML). AutoML tools aim to make machine learning accessible for non-machine learning experts (domain experts), to improve the efficiency of machine learning, and to accelerate machine learning research. But although automation and efficiency are among AutoML’s main selling points, the process still requires human involvement at a number of vital steps, including understanding the attributes of domain-specific data, defining prediction problems, creating a suitable training dataset, and selecting a promising machine learning technique. These steps often require a prolonged back-and-forth that makes this process inefficient for domain experts and data scientists alike and keeps so-called AutoML systems from being truly automatic. In this review article, we introduce a new classification system for AutoML systems, using a seven-tiered schematic to distinguish these systems based on their level of autonomy. We begin by describing what an end-to-end machine learning pipeline actually looks like, and which subtasks of the machine learning pipeline have been automated so far. We highlight those subtasks that are still done manually—generally by a data scientist—and explain how this limits domain experts’ access to machine learning. Next, we introduce our novel level-based taxonomy for AutoML systems and define each level according to the scope of automation support provided. Finally, we lay out a roadmap for the future, pinpointing the research required to further automate the end-to-end machine learning pipeline and discussing important challenges that stand in the way of this ambitious goal.


Author(s):  
Rusul Yousif Alsalhee ◽  
Abdulhussein Mohsin Abdullah

<p>The Holy Quran, due to it is full of many inspiring stories and multiple lessons that need to understand it requires additional attention when it comes to searching issues and information retrieval. Many works were carried out in the Holy Quran field, but some of these dealt with a part of the Quran or covered it in general, and some of them did not support semantic research techniques and the possibility of understanding the Quranic knowledge by the people and computers. As for others, techniques of data analysis, processing, and ontology were adopted, which led to directed these to linguistic aspects more than semantic. Another weakness in the previous works, they have adopted the method manually entering ontology, which is costly and time-consuming. In this paper, we constructed the ontology of Quranic stories. This ontology depended in its construction on the MappingMaster domain-specific language (MappingMaster DSL)technology, through which concepts and individuals can be created and linked automatically to the ontology from Excel sheets. The conceptual structure was built using the object role modeling (ORM) modeling language. SPARQL query language used to test and evaluate the propsed ontology by asking many competency questions and as a result, the ontology answered all these questions well.</p>


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