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2021 ◽  
Vol 1 (2) ◽  
pp. 13-14
Author(s):  
Foued Sabbagh ◽  

The people of the world have entered a decade phase after bidding farewell to the previous year 2019 and to begin with stability towards a future that is looming on the horizon of many variables that could shape the characteristics of the next decade with the start year of 2020, it will therefore constitute a fundamental change for the future of daily life and the international economy.


2021 ◽  
Vol 27 (3) ◽  
pp. 77-85
Author(s):  
Mikhail V. Pervushin

The article reveals the ideological and substantive concept of one of the most striking monuments of Old Rus’ (medieval) writing “The Tale of the Destruction of Riazan”. This old Rus’ tale has often become the subject of study of literary scholars and historians. At the same time, it was extremely popular among the Old Rus’ scribes. More than a hundred copies of this “Tale” have survived. The article draws attention to previous research. Some conclusions are described and unresolved questions are raised. Then the content of the “Tale” itself is gradually and consistently examined. The generalisation of the epic image of the feast battle is made. Its existence is proved not only in the indicated formula of the “death cup”, but as the idea of the whole work. It was this image that ultimately influenced its structure, subordinated the ideological and artistic conception of the author. Thus, “The Tale of the Destruction of Riazan” is a thoughtful heroic story about the past. It contains a holistic picture of the life of the people and presents in harmonious unity the original artistic concept – the description of the battle as a feast. At the same time, the entire “Tale” being analysed, according to the evidence presented in the article, turns into Praise, and not just its last panegyric part. The main meaning of the whole work transforms the story of the death of Riazan into a description of the glory and greatness of the entire Riazan land. The author of the “Tale” surrounds the Riazan princely family with an aura of holiness. He glorifies them, triumphing on the last sweet-voiced chords of the whole story, full of “inner pathos”.


2021 ◽  
Vol 11 (21) ◽  
pp. 9880
Author(s):  
Barbara Guidi

Social media is becoming one of the dominant ways to communicate. Before social media, people were extremely limited in their means to interact with others, and they were limited largely to the people that they knew in person. However, this impact on people in real life has damaged privacy. Alternative solutions have been proposed in order to overcome current social media issues. In this direction, blockchain is one of the most promising, and several blockchain-based social media have been proposed. In this paper, we analyze blockchain online social media from the technical point of view in order to understand the current trend of social DApps and to describe which characteristics are important in a blockchain-based social media scenario. We analyze real data by exploiting one of the most well-known DApps sites, and we compare current technologies in order to highlight which ones can be better applied to a real social scenario, such as Facebook.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Matthew Scully

Abstract By attending to art and writing that interrogates US citizenship and state violence, this essay foregrounds the structural antagonism between democracy as an instituted form of rule, which depends on inegalitarian hierarchies, and democracy’s egalitarian drive. It argues that the realization of democracy as a form of governance (consensus democracy) occurs by substituting the rule of a part for the whole, which violently forces democracy’s constitutive figures to conform to and negotiate its organizing logics. Nari Ward’s We the People (2011) allegorizes this inherent tension in democracy as one between synecdoche and metonymy. The article then theorizes a new form of democratic politics through an engagement with Jacques Rancière before turning to Ocean Vuong’s “Notebook Fragments” (2016) and “Self-Portrait as Exit Wounds” (2016) as articulations of a democratic aesthetics constituted by figures—including metonymy, irony, and catachresis—that interrupt the substitutions of synecdoche. Vuong’s poetry foregrounds the violence enacted by state fantasies and insists on the democratic equality disavowed by consensus democracy. Together, Ward and Vuong locate the political force of aesthetics not in reassuring visions of inclusion but in operations that disturb and resist any form of hierarchy.


2021 ◽  
Vol 9 ◽  
Author(s):  
Karen Lander ◽  
Markus Bindemann

Imagine you lose sight of your friends (or parents) for a moment while you are out at the park. You glance around and then spot them in the distance. You easily pick them out from all the other people in the park and you correctly identify them. This process is called familiar face recognition. For most of us, this process seems easy and generally people are good at recognising familiar faces. However, a few people really struggle to recognise the people around them. Other people are “super-recognisers” who have an extraordinary ability to recognise faces very accurately. How good are you at recognising faces? In this article, we outline why some people are better (or worse) at recognising faces and explore the possible importance of brain differences, mental processes, and personality in this ability.


2021 ◽  
Vol 9 ◽  
pp. 21-28
Author(s):  
Adrian Humphris ◽  
Geoff Mew

Wellington was in a period of transition in the 1850s. The first flurry of settlement was easing somewhat and trading was becoming established. However, the earthquakes of 1848 and 1855 shook not only buildings not designed to withstand them, but also the confidence of the immigrant population. People were quick to realise that timber flexed better than brick or cob, but, in the process, they lost several of the earliest buildings with any pretensions to architectural merit. Together with the shaky nature of the economy, and the fact that Auckland was the capital city, there was little incentive for men whose sole training was in architecture to attempt to practice full time.The paucity of architectural records from the 1850s further complicates accurate evaluation of the situation, but it is clear that many of the people designing buildings had multiple skills in several other fields besides architecture. Buildings definitely dated to the 1850s that remain in Wellington can be numbered on one hand and not one of them can be said to have been designed by an architect. The two men with the largest tallies of Wellington building designs in the 1850s also claimed skills in surveying and civil engineering, whereas the two (possibly three) trained architects that we know of seem to have obtained minimal work in their field and to have largely diversified into other occupations. A further five names are associated with Wellington architecture in some way during the 1850s, either with the design of single buildings or simply advertising their services in local newspapers - with no evidence they actually obtained any work. In this paper we look at the backgrounds of the major designers including the trained architects, their work and a few of the factors which caused most of them to seek alternative employment.


2021 ◽  
Vol 3 (121) ◽  
pp. 7-15
Author(s):  
B Abzhet

The process of collecting and publishing Kazakh fairy tales dates back to thesecond half of the 19th century. During the period of the colonization of the Kazakh steppe by theRussian Empire, people of different professions who came here for different purposes and workedin the civil service began to pay attention not only to the registration of land wealth, but also to thestudy of samples of oral folk art. On the pages of the first editions “Turkistan ualayatynyn gazeti”,“Dala ualayatynyn gazeti”, published in the second half of the 19th century in the Kazakh languageand spreading in the Kazakh steppe, numerous folk tales were published, taken from oral folk art.Along with Russian scientists, representatives of the Kazakh intelligentsia and educators were alsoengaged in the study of fairy tales. Kazakh fairy tales were published several times at the beginningof the twentieth century and after the establishment of Soviet power. After gaining independence ofKazakhstan, numerous fairy tales were published in whole volumes. At the same time, somepublications were found and re-published fairy tales that had not been previously published. Weknow that Kazakh fairy tales, collected in manuscript centers and library funds, have a rich heritage.Finding and republishing unpublished tales is an urgent need today. In the article, the author notesthe importance of searching for fairy tales in the archives of the regional level, as well as among themanuscripts collected in manuscript funds and written in Cyrillic, Arabic or Latin letters, and thepublication of these fairy tales, especially previously unknown ones. He also draws attention to thespiritual heritage of the people and the significance of fairy tales in modern folklore.


2021 ◽  
Vol 3 (121) ◽  
pp. 26-38
Author(s):  
B Abdualiuly

The terrain is diverse. Depending on the features in different regions, geographicalobjects are assigned different names. Each nation, based on its life and worldview, depending onnature, gives different names to the places in which it lives. The article will provide a linguistic andgeographical analysis of the relationship of the triad man – earth – name, taking into account thetraditions common to all peoples inhabiting the Earth, including the principles of naming theKazakh ethnic group. Geographical names in modern science are evaluated as the “language of theearth”. It is divided into generalizing and individualizing names. The generalizing names includefolk terms, the individualizing names are toponyms, the first have a descriptive meaning, the secondare individualizing, i.e. they perform the function of personification from other forms. Since theyare closely related to each other, they originate from each other, in most cases they are of a longnature. This is the evolutionary dynamics of language development.In this article, prepared on the basis of the concepts of “interdisciplinary connection”,“complexity”, which attract attention by their relevance in modern science, the regularities of thedevelopment of orographic terms are also considered. The course of development is divided intoterminological, as an element of an artistic language, and toponymic directions of development. Thefigurative meaning, the term meaning, the toponymic meaning are a vivid manifestation of thesethree directions in one word. The truth is that over time, becoming more and more autonomousfrom each other, each in its own way turns into a separate sphere. The research is devoted to thetheoretical and applied description of the degree of quality with the definition of the lexical systemof orographic terms that have developed in the language of the people for centuries.


2021 ◽  
Vol 9 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Ana Piñar-Gutiérrez ◽  
Elena Dios-Fuentes ◽  
Pablo Remón-Ruiz ◽  
Diego Del Can-Sánchez ◽  
Antonio Vázquez-Morejón ◽  
...  

Abstract Objective To describe the characteristics of the patients, as well as the treatment outcomes for the people treated in an Endocrinology and Nutrition unit with a diagnosis of SE-ED (> 7 years evolution despite evidence-based conventional treatment). Methods A descriptive observational study was conducted. Patients with a diagnosis of SE-ED (anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa) treated in the Endocrinology and Nutrition service of the Virgen del Rocío University Hospital between 2014 and 2019 were included. Results 67 patients were contacted and accepted to participate in the study. 95.5% were women. 67.2% were diagnosed with AN (anorexia nervosa) and 32.8% with BN (bulimia nervosa). Their median ages (years) at the onset of symptoms, beginning of follow-up and at present were 17, 32 and 42.5 respectively. Their median time of follow-up was 9 years. 73.1% had mental comorbitidy and AN patients had more osteoporosis (48.9% vs 22.7%, p = 0.04) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (31.1% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.014). Discussion The SE-ED patients in our sample began treatment years after the onset of symptoms, which may have led to their chronification. This emphasizes the importance of an early diagnosis in eating disorders. They presented with a high rate of physical complications and mental comorbidity. In the current sample, it was determined that patients with AN presented with higher rates of osteoporosis and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism than patients with BN. Level of evidence Level III: Evidence obtained from well-designed cohort or case–control analytic studies. Plain English summary At present, the criteria for severe and enduring eating disorders (SE-ED) are not sufficiently clearly defined. It has been calculated that approximately 20% of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and 10% of patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) suffer a chronification. We evaluated the characteristics of the patients, as well as the treatment outcomes for the people treated in an Endocrinology and Nutrition unit with a diagnosis of SE-ED (which was made based on an evolution greater than 7 years despite conventional treatment). The SE-ED patients in our sample began treatment years after the onset of symptoms, which may have led to their chronification. They presented with a high rate of physical complications and mental comorbidity. In the current sample, it was determined that patients with AN presented with higher rates of osteoporosis (health condition that weakens bones, making them fragile and more likely to break) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (illness in which testes or ovaries produce little or no sex hormones due to a problem in the pituitary gland) than patients with BN.


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