Oryza Rufipogon
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2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Xuan Wang ◽  
Yue Han ◽  
Yuexiong Zhang ◽  
Biao Deng ◽  
Biqiu Wu ◽  
...  

Abstract The brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens Stål, BPH) is one of the most destructive rice pests worldwide. GXU202 is a germplasm of common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff. ) with high resistance to the BPH. In this study, the genetic analysis indicated that the BPH resistant phenotype of GXU202 is controlled by a major gene. Through the combination and comparison of QTL linkage and BSA-seq analyses, a novel gene locus BPH41 conferring BPH resistance was identified, which has been finely mapped to a 114-kb region delimited by D01031 and W1 on chromosome 4. The markers D01031 and D01045 showed high accuracy in predicting resistant phenotypes to BPH, suggesting their reliability for marker-assisted selection of BPH41 in breeding for BPH resistant rice varieties. The present identification of BPH41 will establish a foundation for further map-based cloning and functional characterization of the gene.


Plant Disease ◽  
2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Hong Kai Zhou ◽  
Yue Lian Liu ◽  
Jian Rong Tang ◽  
Fei Teng Zhong ◽  
Ya Li

Wild rice (Oryza rufipogon), a species only recently cultivated in China, is an invaluable resource for rice breeding and basic research. In June 2019, a leaf spot disease on wild rice (O. rufipogon cv. ‘Haihong-12’) was observed in a 3.3 ha field in Zhanjiang (20.93 N, 109.79 E), China. The early symptoms were the presence of small, brown, and circular to oval spots that eventually turned reddish brown. The size of the spots varied from 1.0–5.0 mm × 1.0–3.0 mm. Disease incidence was higher than 20%. High temperature and high humidity climate were favorable for the disease occurrence. Twenty diseased leaves were collected from the field. The margin of the diseased tissues was cut into 2 mm × 2 mm pieces, surface-disinfected with 75% ethanol for 30 s and 2% sodium hypochlorite for 60 s, then rinsed three times with sterile water before isolation. The tissues were plated onto potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium and incubated at 28 °C in the dark for 4 days. Pure cultures were produced by transferring hyphal tips to new PDA plates. Three isolates, namely, Cls-1, Cls-2, and Cls-3, were subjected to further morphological and molecular studies. The colonies of the three isolates on PDA were initially light gray later becoming dark green. Conidiophores were erect, dark brown, geniculate, and unbranched. Conidia were fusiform, geniculate or hook-shaped, smooth-walled, dark-brown, 3-septate, with the second curved cell about 13.4–18.2 μm × 6.5–8.6 μm in size (n = 30). These morphological features agreed with previous descriptions of Curvularia lunata (Wakker) Boed (Macri and Lenna 1974). The ITS region, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and translation elongation factor (EF-1α) were amplified using primers ITS1/ITS4, gpp1/gdp2 (Berbee et al. 1999), and EF-1/EF-2 (O’Donnell 1997), respectively. Amplicons of the three isolates were sequenced and submitted to GenBank (accession nos. MW042182, MW042183, and MW042184; MW091453, MW091454, and MW091455; MW090049, MW090050, and MW090051). The sequences of the two isolates were 100% identical to those of C. lunata (accession nos. MG971304, MG979801, MG979800) according to the results of BLAST analysis. A phylogenetic tree was built on the basis of concatenated data from the sequences of ITS, GAPDH, and EF-1α via the maximum likelihood method. The tree clustered Cls-1, Cls-2, and Cls-3 with C. lunata. The three isolates were determined as C. lunata by combining morphological and molecular characteristics. Pathogenicity tests were performed on Cls-1 in a greenhouse at 24 °C–30 °C with 80% relative humidity. Individual rice plants (cv. ‘Haihong-12’) with three leaves were grown in 10 pots, with approximately 50 plants per pot. Five pots were inoculated by spraying a spore suspension (105 spores/mL) onto leaves until runoff occurred, and another five pots were sprayed with sterile water and used as controls. The test was conducted three times. Disease symptoms were observed on the leaves after 10 days, but the controls remained healthy. C. lunata occurs on O. sativa (rice) (Liu et al. 2014; Majeed et al. 2016), but it has not been reported on O. rufipogon until now. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report that C. lunata causes leaf spots on O. rufipogon in China. Thus, vigilance is required for breeding O. rufipogon.


Molecules ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 26 (7) ◽  
pp. 1828
Author(s):  
Zhi-Bin Zhang ◽  
Si-Yao Du ◽  
Bo Ji ◽  
Chang-Jiu Ji ◽  
Yi-Wen Xiao ◽  
...  

Three new helvolic acid derivatives (named sarocladilactone A (1), sarocladilactone B (2) and sarocladic acid A (3a)), together with five known compounds (6,16-diacetoxy-25-hy- droxy-3,7-dioxy-29-nordammara-1,17(20)-dien-21-oic acid (3b), helvolic acid (4), helvolinic acid (5), 6-desacetoxy-helvolic acid (6) and 1,2-dihydrohelvolic acid (7)), were isolated from the endophytic fungus DX-THL3, obtained from the leaf of Dongxiang wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.). The structures of the new compounds were elucidated via HR-MS, extensive 1D and 2D NMR analysis and comparison with reported data. Compounds 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 7 exhibited potent antibacterial activities. In particular, sarocladilactone B (2), helvolinic acid (5) and 6-desacetoxy-helvolic acid (6) exhibited strongly Staphylococcus aureus inhibitory activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 4, 1 and 4 μg/mL, respectively. The structure–activity relationship (SAR) of these compounds was primarily summarized.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Yong-Chao Xu ◽  
Jie Zhang ◽  
Dong-Yan Zhang ◽  
Ying-Hui Nan ◽  
Song Ge ◽  
...  

Abstract Background Wild rice, including Oryza nivara and Oryza rufipogon, which are considered as the ancestors of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.), possess high genetic diversity and serve as a crucial resource for breeding novel cultivars of cultivated rice. Although many rice domestication related traits, such as seed shattering and plant architecture, have been intensively studied at the phenotypic and genomic levels, further investigation is needed to understand the molecular basis of phenotypic differences between cultivated and wild rice. Drought stress is one of the most severe abiotic stresses affecting rice growth and production. Adaptation to drought stress involves a cascade of genes and regulatory factors that form complex networks. Long noncoding natural antisense transcripts (lncNATs), a class of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), regulate the corresponding sense transcripts and play an important role in plant growth and development. However, the contribution of lncNATs to drought stress response in wild rice remains largely unknown. Results Here, we conducted strand-specific RNA sequencing (ssRNA-seq) analysis of Nipponbare (O. sativa ssp. japonica) and two O. nivara accessions (BJ89 and BJ278) to determine the role of lncNATs in drought stress response in wild rice. A total of 1,246 lncRNAs were identified, including 1,091 coding–noncoding NAT pairs, of which 50 were expressed only in Nipponbare, and 77 were expressed only in BJ89 and/or BJ278. Of the 1,091 coding–noncoding NAT pairs, 240 were differentially expressed between control and drought stress conditions. Among these 240 NAT pairs, 12 were detected only in Nipponbare, and 187 were detected uniquely in O. nivara. Furthermore, 10 of the 240 coding–noncoding NAT pairs were correlated with genes previously demonstrated to be involved in stress response; among these, nine pairs were uniquely found in O. nivara, and one pair was shared between O. nivara and Nipponbare. Conclusion We identified lncNATs associated with drought stress response in cultivated rice and O. nivara. These results will improve our understanding of the function of lncNATs in drought tolerance and accelerate rice breeding.


2021 ◽  
Vol 9 (1) ◽  
pp. 175
Author(s):  
Jingjing Chang ◽  
Shaohua Shi ◽  
Lei Tian ◽  
Marcio F. A. Leite ◽  
Chunling Chang ◽  
...  

The rhizomicrobial community is influenced by plant genotype. However, the potential differences in the co-assembly of bacterial and fungal communities between parental lines and different generations of rice progenies have not been examined. Here we compared the bacterial and fungal communities in the rhizomicrobiomes of female parent Oryza rufipogon wild rice; male parent Oryza sativa cultivated rice; their F1 progeny; and the F2, F3 and F4 self-crossing generations. Our results showed that the bacterial and fungal α-diversities of the hybrid F1 and self-crossing generations (F2, F3, F4) were closer to one of the two parental lines, which may indicate a role of the parental line in the diversity of the rhizosphere microbial community assembly. Self-crossing from F1 to F4 led to weak co-variation of the bacterial and fungal communities and distinct rhizosphere microbiomes. In the parental and self-crossing progenies, the reduction of community dissimilarity was higher for the fungal community than for the bacterial community.


Plant Disease ◽  
2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Yue Lian Liu ◽  
Jian Rong Tang ◽  
Ya Li ◽  
Hong Kai Zhou

Wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) has been widely studied and cultivated in China in recent years due to its antioxidant activities and health-promoting effects. In December 2018, leaf spot disease on wild rice (O. rufipogon cv. Haihong-12) was observed in Zhanjiang (20.93 N, 109.79 E), China. The early symptom was small purple-brown lesions on the leaves. Then, the once-localized lesions coalesced into a larger lesion with a tan to brown necrotic center surrounded by a chlorotic halo. The diseased leaves eventually died. Disease incidence was higher than 30%. Twenty diseased leaves were collected from the fields. The margin of diseased tissues was cut into 2 × 2 mm2 pieces, surface-disinfected with 75% ethanol for 30 s and 2% sodium hypochlorite for 60 s, and then rinsed three times with sterile water before isolation. The tissues were plated on potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium and incubated at 28 °C in the dark for 4 days. Pure cultures were produced by transferring hyphal tips to new PDA plates. Fifteen isolates were obtained. Two isolates (OrL-1 and OrL-2) were subjected to further morphological and molecular studies. The colonies of OrL-1 and OrL-1 on PDA were initially light gray, but it became dark gray with age. Conidiophores were single, straight to flexuous, multiseptate, and brown. Conidia were oblong, slightly curved, and light brown with four to nine septa, and measured 35.2–120.3 µm × 10.3–22.5 µm (n = 30). The morphological characteristics of OrL-1 and OrL-2 were consistent with the description on Bipolaris oryzae (Breda de Haan) Shoemaker (Manamgoda et al. 2014). The ITS region, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and translation elongation factor (EF-1α) were amplified using primers ITS1/ITS4, GDF1gpp1/GDR1 gdp2 (Berbee et al. 1999), and EF-1α-F/EF-1α-R EF-1/EF-2 (O’Donnell 2000), respectively. Amplicons of OrL-1 and OrL-2 were sequenced and submitted to GenBank (accession nos. MN880261 and MN880262, MT027091 and MT027092, and MT027093 and MT027094). The sequences of the two isolates were 99.83%–100% identical to that of B. oryzae (accession nos. MF490854,MF490831,MF490810) in accordance with BLAST analysis. A phylogenetic tree was generated on the basis of concatenated data from the sequences of ITS, GAPDH, and EF-1α via Maximum Likelihood method, which clustered OrL-1 and OrL-2 with B. oryzae. The two isolates were determined as B. oryzae by combining morphological and molecular characteristics. Pathogenicity test was performed on OrL-1 in a greenhouse at 24 °C to 30 °C with 80% relative humidity. Rice (cv. Haihong-12) with 3 leaves was grown in 10 pots, with approximately 50 plants per pot. Five pots were inoculated by spraying a spore suspension (105 spores/mL) onto leaves until runoff occurred, and five pots were sprayed with sterile water and used as controls. The test was conducted three times. Disease symptoms were observed on leaves after 10 days, but the controls remained healthy. The morphological characteristics and ITS sequences of the fungal isolates re-isolated from the diseased leaves were identical to those of B. oryzae. B. oryzae has been confirmed to cause leaf spot on Oryza sativa (Barnwal et al. 2013), but as an endophyte has been reported in O. rufipogon (Wang et al. 2015).. Thus, this study is the first report of B. oryzae causing leaf spot in O. rufipogon in China. This disease has become a risk for cultivated wild rice with the expansion of cultivation areas. Thus, vigilance is required.


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