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Published By Energy Psychology Press

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Updated Saturday, 06 March 2021

2020 ◽  
Vol 12 (2) ◽  
pp. 12-19
Author(s):  
Erin Taylor ◽  
Mahima Kalla ◽  
John Freedom ◽  
Karen Crowley

2020 ◽  
Vol 12 (2) ◽  
pp. 20-30
Author(s):  
David Lake
Keyword(s):  

2020 ◽  
Vol 12 (1) ◽  
pp. 13-27
Author(s):  
Sylvia Lindinger-Sternar ◽  
◽  
Chelsie Dollar ◽  
Sachin Jain ◽  
Jared Roberts

You are here: Home › Abstracts › Abstracts – Volume 12, Number 1, May 2020 › Group-Based Interventions and Test-Taking Anxiety in Male College Students of Varied Ethnicities doi 10.9769/EPJ.2020.12.1.SLS Sylvia Lindinger-Sternart, University of Providence, Great Falls,Montana, USA Chelsie Dollar, Great Falls, Montana, USA Sachin Jain, University of Providence, Montana, USA Jared Roberts, University of Providence, Montana, USA Abstract Purpose: Panic disorder is a disabling condition associated with reduced quality of life and impaired functioning. It is one of the most common mental health conditions in the United States and several European countries, and causes a significant burden of disease on impacted families. Typically, women have double the prevalence rate of anxiety-related disorders as compared to men. This preliminary study aimed to explore whether Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) offers potential as a treatment to reduce fear of future panic attacks in women who suffer from panic attacks. Eight women participated in the study. Outcomes were measured using the Subjective Units of Distress(SUD) scale and the Panic and Agoraphobia Scale(PAS). Results indicated reductions in both SUD and PAS scores at pre- and post-intervention, though not statistically significant, likely due to the small sample size. Nonetheless, the findings of this study support preliminary evidence that EFT may offer potential as a treatment for women with panic disorder. Further research to confirm statistical significance and long-term impacts of EFT needs to be conducted. Method: The current preliminary study adopted a one-group pre test, post test quasi-experimental A-B-A design, using the subjects themselves as their own control group. Results: The participants ranged from 35 to 53 years of age with a mean age of 43.75 years (SD 5.82) and median of 44 years, which is consistent with the literature that anxiety and panic encompasses all age brackets (Flint & Gagnon, 2003; Smoller et al., 2003; Yonkers, Bruce, Dyck, & Keller, 2003; Yonkers et al., 1998). Eight participants completed the demographic questionnaire, which included medications taken daily. Although all the participants were on medications, only five participants took medication for anxiety. Several different types of medicines or supplements were used by participants such as SSRIs, benzodiazepines, and magnesium, which is consistent with standards and guidelines for treating anxiety and panic disorders (Faria et al., 2012; Flint & Gagnon, 2003; Van Apeldoorn et al., 2014). Among the treatments besides medications, the most popular intervention was yoga and deep breathing. Participants reported an average caffeine intake of 1.125 cups per day (SD 1.13) with a range of 0 to 3 cups per day and median of 1 cup per day. Participants’ caffeine intake was similar to consumption patterns of the general population and can be eliminated as a variable that may influence this study’s results. This approach is consistent with the literature from the American Psychiatric Association (2013). Conclusion: To date, this is the first research study completed to determine whether EFT can assist with the reduction of fear of future panic attacks in women. The results showed a decrease in the PAS scores from the first day to the last day after four 60-minute sessions of group EFT. In addition, the SUD scores also showed a decrease not only from start of each session to end of each session but also from the first EFT session to the end of the last session, indicating the participants’ fear of having a future panic attack decreased from the first session to the last session. Statistically significant results were not obtained, however, likely due to the small sample size and high participant attrition rate. Nonetheless, this study offers preliminary support for the conducting of larger clinical trials to confirm the efficacy of EFT for treating fear of future panic attacks in women, as well as long-term impacts of EFT treatment on panic.


2020 ◽  
Vol 12 (1) ◽  
pp. 28-43
Author(s):  
Janine Mitchell ◽  
Gerasimos Chatzidamianos ◽  

Background Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) is proposed as an effective therapy for the treatment of common mental health problems. It has, however, been met with criticism and is not presently considered a mainstream treatment option for conditions such as anxiety or trauma. Conversely, both cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) have achieved recognition in advancing into mainstream status, yet EFT is still perceived as an alternative treatment option despite evidence of effectiveness, in more than 100 clinical trials and 40 research reviews and meta-analyses. Aims: By examining the views of trained practitioners, this project aimed to explore the barriers and the facilitators to EFT becoming a mainstream treatment option in the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) for common mental health problems. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted (N=12) exploring views of EFT practitioners. Transcripts were then subjected to thematic analysis. Results: Analysis of participants’ views resulted in three themes: (1) research as an asset and a challenge, (2) public perceptions of EFT as a therapeutic modality, and (3) EFT training standards. These themes are perceived as interlinked in the process of EFT becoming mainstream. Findings from this study indicate the requirement of further research evidence that is more widely disseminated to enable increased awareness to the public and those within the medical profession of EFT as a potentially beneficial adjunct intervention. Importantly, training for EFT therapists needs to be improved and standardized. Implications: Based on the results, a series of recommendations are discussed that aim to address the barriers identified.


2019 ◽  
Vol 11 (2) ◽  
pp. 31-49
Author(s):  
Katrina Anderson ◽  
Beverly Rubik ◽  
Werner Absenger

2019 ◽  
Vol 11 (2) ◽  
pp. 17-30
Author(s):  
John Fitch III ◽  
Krista Kimmel ◽  
Jennifer Fairchild ◽  
Joel DiGirolamo

2019 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 41-56
Author(s):  
David Feinstein

Most Energy Psychology protocols include a component in which the client is guided in the use of personally tailored wording related to a target problem or goal. These phrases are stated simultaneously with the stimulation of selected acupuncture points (acupoints) via tapping. Thought Field Therapy (TFT) and its popular derivative, Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT), are the most well-known variations of the acupoint tapping approaches. These therapies have been validated for their efficacy and unusual speed in resolving psychological and physical conditions in more than 100 clinical trials and several meta-analyses. Clinicians and life coaches wanting to incorporate acupoint tapping into their practices can readily learn the basic protocols but are often unsure about how to formulate the most effective wording to accompany the client’s self-tapping. This paper presents a qualitative analysis of videotaped statements that were judged to move the treatment forward in relationship to three process outcomes: (a) the statement resulted in the practitioner becoming better attuned to the client’s intentions for and experience with the therapy, (b) it explored the issues relevant to the client’s needs and goals in order to deepen both the client’s and the practitioner’s understanding of them, and/or (c) it led the client toward more effective ways of addressing pertinent issues. These three categories—attune, explore, lead—were derived from the 62 therapeutic functions of language that were identified as the videotaped wording was being coded. The list is only an initial formulation, based on one clinician’s sessions as analyzed by that clinician. It is intended as a first step toward a more comprehensive investigation of the use of language in Energy Psychology sessions, its impact on client outcomes, and its implications for practitioner training.


2019 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 57-64
Author(s):  
John Hartung ◽  
◽  
Norma Alicia Leal Morales

Three field studies are described in which Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT), Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), and similar innovative therapies were used to treat residents of different correctional settings. Clients in a juvenile residential facility, an adult community corrections center, and an adult county jail were treated for psychological and medical complaints. The authors summarize how the practices were adapted to specific settings, how challenges were approached, and what staff and clients said about the programs. Though the sites and applications differed, some common findings and recommendations for future research are noted.


2019 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 13-40
Author(s):  
Judith Pennington ◽  
Debbie Sabot ◽  
Dawson Church

Background Stress-reduction techniques can be used in combination with each other. Two such methods are Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) and EcoMeditation. EFT is an evidence-based self-help method. Reviews and meta-analyses examining more than 100 studies demonstrate the efficacy of EFT for anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). EcoMeditation is a secular meditation technique that combines neurofeedback, mindfulness, and heart coherence. Studies demonstrate that EFT and EcoMeditation can improve cortisol levels, heart rate, and other health markers. Objectives EFT is most commonly used to relieve stress and treat traumatic childhood memories, while EcoMeditation is used to produce calm emotional states. This study sought to elucidate whether the release of traumatic stress facilitated by EFT would enhance entry into meditative states, and secondly whether EcoMeditation prior to EFT might establish a baseline of wellbeing that assists in the resolution of trauma. Methods The Mind Mirror 6 (MM) electroencephalogram (EEG) was used to assess brain states in eight participants attending a weekend workshop. The MM measures changes in three advanced neurophysiological states of consciousness characterized by relative amplitude relationships between brain-wave frequencies: 1) the Awakened Mind pattern of lucid awareness, creativity, insight, intuition, and spiritual connection; 2) the Evolved Mind of nondual unity consciousness; and 3) the Gamma Synchrony pattern of whole-brain synchrony, mental integration, nonlocal awareness, and insight. Assessments included eyes-closed (EC) and eyes-open (EO) states, in order to determine whether changes in consciousness were sustained in waking life. Baselines were collected at the start and end of each day, and after EcoMeditation, which was performed for 20 minutes on day two. Results A statistically significant EO posttest change was found in the Awakened Mind pattern (p = 0.003). Cohen’s d = 0.79 indicated a large treatment effect. Increased brainwave coherence—a measure of efficient brain function—was found in all participants in at least one frequency category, while six increased EO Gamma Synchrony. Coherence analytics showed increased brain-wave coherence primarily in alpha but also in theta and delta and occasionally in low and midrange gamma. During EcoMeditation, all participants generated high-amplitude 45–65 Hz gamma frequencies and Gamma Synchrony values, some at the top of the statistical range, with high synchrony at posttest. Conclusions EcoMeditation produced extraordinarily high levels of Gamma Synchrony. In two days, many participants acquired elevated brain states normally found only after years of meditation practice. EcoMeditation facilitated participants’ ability to induce and sustain the alpha brain waves characteristic of high-level emotional, mental, and spiritual integration. A combination of the two methods produced statistical gains in the EO Awakened Mind, indicating that participants were able to carry elevated mental states into waking consciousness.


2018 ◽  
Vol 10 (2) ◽  
pp. 13-27
Author(s):  
Anne M. Jensen

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