Yearbook of Medical Informatics
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1330
(FIVE YEARS 466)

H-INDEX

24
(FIVE YEARS 15)

Published By Georg Thieme Verlag Kg

2364-0502, 0943-4747
Updated Saturday, 04 September 2021

2021 ◽  
Vol 30 (01) ◽  
pp. 139-140

Fabregat A, Magret M, Ferré JA, Vernet A, Guasch N, Rodríguez A, Gómez J, Bodí M. A Machine Learning decision-making tool for extubation in Intensive Care Unit patients. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0169260720317028?via%3Dihub Kempa-Liehr AW, Lin CYC, Britten R, Armstrong D, Wallace J, Mordaunt D, O’Sullivan M. Healthcare pathway discovery and probabilistic machine learning. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1386505619308068?via%3Dihub Li Y, Nair P, Lu XH, Wen Z, Wang Y, Dehaghi AAK, Miao Y, Liu W, Ordog T, Biernacka JM, Ryu E, Olson JE, Frye MA, Liu A, Guo L, Marelli A, Ahuja Y, Davila-Velderrain J, Kellis M. Inferring multimodal latent topics from electronic health records. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7242436/ Weemaes M, Martens S, Cuypers L, van Elslande J, Hoet K, Welkenhuysen J, Goossens R, Wouters S, Houben E, Jeuris E, Jeuris K, Laenen L, Bruyninckx K, Beuselinck K, André E, Depypere M, Desmet S, Lagrou K, Van Ranst M, Verdonck AKLC, Goveia J. Laboratory information system requirements to manage the COVID-19 pandemic: A report from the Belgian national reference testing center. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7197526/


2021 ◽  
Vol 30 (01) ◽  
pp. 282-282

Zheng L, Wang O, Hao S, Ye C, Liu M, Xia M, Sabo AL, Markovic L, Stearns F, Kanov L, Sylvester KL, Widen R, McElhinney DB, Zhang W, Liao J, Ling XB. Development of an early-warning system for high-risk patients for suicide attempt using deep learning and electronic health records. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7033212/ Roope LSJ, Tonkin-Crine S, Herd N, Michie S, Pouwels KB, Castro-Sanchez E, Sallis A, Hopkins S, Robotham JV, Crook DW, Peto T. Peters M, Butler CC, Walker AS, Wordsworth S. Reducing expectations for antibiotics in primary care: a randomised experiment to test the response to fear-based messages about antimicrobial resistance. https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-020-01553-6 Degeling C, Carter SM, van Oijen AM McAnulty J, Sintchenko V, Braunack-Mayer A, Yarwood T, Johnson J, Gilbert GL. Community perspectives on the benefits and risks of technologically enhanced communicable disease surveillance systems: a report on four community juries. https://bmcmedethics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12910-020-00474-6


2021 ◽  
Vol 30 (01) ◽  
pp. 134-140
Author(s):  
W. O. Hackl ◽  
A. Hoerbst ◽  

Summary Objective: In this synopsis, we give an overview of recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2020 in the field of Clinical Information Systems (CIS). Method: As CIS section editors, we annually apply a systematic process to retrieve articles for the International Medical Informatics Association Yearbook of Medical Informatics. For seven years now, we use the same query to find relevant publications in the CIS field. Each year we retrieve more than 2,400 papers which we categorize in a multi-pass review to distill a preselection of 15 candidate papers. External reviewers and yearbook editors then assess the selected candidate papers. Based on the review results, the IMIA Yearbook editorial board chooses up to four best publications for the section at a selection meeting. To get an overview of the content of the retrieved articles, we use text mining and term co-occurrence mapping techniques. Results: We carried out the query in mid-January 2021 and retrieved a deduplicated result set of 2,787 articles from 1,135 different journals. We nominated 15 papers as candidates and finally selected four of them as the best papers in the CIS section. As in the previous years, the content analysis of the articles revealed the broad spectrum of topics covered by CIS research. Thus, this year we could observe a significant impact of COVID-19 on CIS research. Conclusions: The trends in CIS research, as seen in recent years, continue to be observable. What was very visible was the impact of the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which has affected not only our lives but also CIS.


2021 ◽  
Vol 30 (01) ◽  
pp. 091-099
Author(s):  
Jenna Marquard

Objective: Human factors and ergonomics (HF/E) frameworks and methods are becoming embedded in the health informatics community. There is now broad recognition that health informatics tools must account for the diverse needs, characteristics, and abilities of end users, as well as their context of use. The objective of this review is to synthesize the current nature and scope of HF/E integration into the health informatics community. Methods: Because the focus of this synthesis is on understanding the current integration of the HF/E and health informatics research communities, we manually reviewed all manuscripts published in primary HF/E and health informatics journals during 2020. Results: HF/E-focused health informatics studies included in this synthesis focused heavily on EHR customizations, specifically clinical decision support customizations and customized data displays, and on mobile health innovations. While HF/E methods aimed to jointly improve end user safety, performance, and satisfaction, most HF/E-focused health informatics studies measured only end user satisfaction. Conclusion: HF/E-focused health informatics researchers need to identify and communicate methodological standards specific to health informatics, to better synthesize findings across resource intensive HF/E-focused health informatics studies. Important gaps in the HF/E design and evaluation process should be addressed in future work, including support for technology development platforms and training programs so that health informatics designers are as diverse as end users.


2021 ◽  
Vol 30 (01) ◽  
pp. 026-037
Author(s):  
Binyam Tilahun ◽  
Kassahun Dessie Gashu ◽  
Zeleke Abebaw Mekonnen ◽  
Berhanu Fikadie Endehabtu ◽  
Dessie Abebaw Angaw

Summary Background: Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) is currently spreading exponentially around the globe. Various digital health technologies are currently being used as weapons in the fight against the pandemic in different ways by countries. The main objective of this review is to explore the role of digital health technologies in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic and address the gaps in the use of these technologies for tackling the pandemic. Methods: We conducted a scoping review guided by the Joanna Briggs Institute guidelines. The articles were searched using electronic databases including MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane Library, and Hinari. In addition, Google and Google scholar were searched. Studies that focused on the application of digital health technologies on COVID-19 prevention and control were included in the review. We characterized the distribution of technological applications based on geographical locations, approaches to apply digital health technologies and main findings. The study findings from the existing literature were presented using thematic content analysis. Results: A total of 2,601 potentially relevant studies were generated from the initial search and 22 studies were included in the final review. The review found that telemedicine was used most frequently, followed by electronic health records and other digital technologies such as artificial intelligence, big data, and the internet of things (IoT). Digital health technologies were used in multiple ways in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including screening and management of patients, methods to minimize exposure, modelling of disease spread, and supporting overworked providers. Conclusion: Digital health technologies like telehealth, mHealth, electronic medical records, artificial intelligence, the internet of things, and big data/internet were used in different ways for the prevention and control of the COVID-19 pandemic in different settings using multiple approaches. For more effective deployment of digital health tools in times of pandemics, development of a guiding policy and standard on the development, deployment, and use of digital health tools in response to a pandemic is recommended.


2021 ◽  
Vol 30 (01) ◽  
pp. 210-218
Author(s):  
Pascal Staccini ◽  
Annie Y. S. Lau ◽  

Summary Objective: To summarise the state of the art during the year 2020 in consumer health informatics and education, with a special emphasis on “Managing Pandemics with Health Informatics - Successes and Challenges”. Methods: We conducted a systematic search of articles published in PubMed using a predefined set of queries, which identified 147 potential articles for review. These articles were screened according to topic relevance and 15 were selected for consideration of best paper candidates, which were then presented to a panel of international experts for full paper review and scoring. The top five papers were discussed in a consensus meeting. Three papers received the highest score from the expert panel, and these papers were selected to be representative papers on consumer informatics for managing pandemics in the year 2020. Results: Bibliometrics analysis conducted on words found in abstracts of the candidate papers revealed 4 clusters of articles, where the clustering outcomes explained 77.04% of the dispersion. The first cluster composed of articles related to the use of mobile apps for video consultation and telehealth during the pandemic. The second revealed studies reporting the lived experience of healthcare workers and patients during COVID-19. The third focused on ways people used the internet to seek for health information during the pandemic and the dissemination of fake news. The last cluster composed of articles reporting the use of social listening methods (e.g., via tweet hashtags) to explore the spread of the virus around the world. Conclusions: The pandemic outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) constitutes a grave risk to the global community and sparks a significant increase in public interest and media coverage, especially on social media. Consumers are facing a new set of challenges that were not considered before COVID-19, often finding themselves in a world that is constantly changing—blended with facts and fake information—and unable to decide what to do next. Despite most people understanding the good will behind public health policies, one must not forget it is individuals we are supporting and that their personal circumstances may affect how they perceive and comply with these policies. Consumers more than ever need help to make sense of the uncertainty and their situation and we need to help them navigate the best option in a world that is constantly evolving.


2021 ◽  
Vol 30 (01) ◽  
pp. 257-263
Author(s):  
Natalia Grabar ◽  
Cyril Grouin ◽  

Summary Objectives: To analyze the content of publications within the medical NLP domain in 2020. Methods: Automatic and manual preselection of publications to be reviewed, and selection of the best NLP papers of the year. Analysis of the important issues. Results: Three best papers have been selected in 2020. We also propose an analysis of the content of the NLP publications in 2020, all topics included. Conclusion: The two main issues addressed in 2020 are related to the investigation of COVID-related questions and to the further adaptation and use of transformer models. Besides, the trends from the past years continue, such as diversification of languages processed and use of information from social networks


2021 ◽  
Vol 30 (01) ◽  
pp. 226-232
Author(s):  
Maria Christofidou ◽  
Nathan Lea ◽  
Pascal Coorevits

Summary Objective: This survey article presents a literature review of relevant publications aiming to explore whether the EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has held true during a time of crisis and the implications that arose during the COVID-19 outbreak. Method and Results: Based on the approach taken and the screening of the relevant articles, the results focus on three themes: a critique on GDPR; the ethics surrounding the use of digital health technologies, namely in the form of mobile applications; and the possibility of cross border transfers of said data outside of Europe. Within this context, the article reviews the arising themes, considers the use of data through mobile health applications, and discusses whether data protection may require a revision when balancing societal and personal interests. Conclusions: In summary, although it is clear that the GDPR has been applied through a mixed and complex experience with data handling during the pandemic, the COVID-19 pandemic has indeed shown that it was a test the GDPR was designed and prepared to undertake. The article suggests that further review and research is needed to first ensure that an understanding of the state of the art in data protection during the pandemic is maintained and second to subsequently explore and carefully create a specific framework for the ethical considerations involved. The paper echoes the literature reviewed and calls for the creation of a unified and harmonised network or database to enable the secure data sharing across borders.


2021 ◽  
Vol 30 (01) ◽  
pp. 001-001
Author(s):  
Sabine Koch ◽  
Keyword(s):  

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