Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Barriers to Their Consumption among University Students in Kuwait: A Cross-Sectional Survey

2021 ◽  
Vol 2021 ◽  
pp. 1-11
Author(s):  
Dalal Alkazemi ◽  
Younis Salmean

Data on fruit and vegetable (F/V) consumption and barriers to their intake by Kuwait college students are needed for health promotional activities to curtail obesity and related comorbidities prevalent in Kuwait. This study employed a cross-sectional survey aimed at assessing the median F/V intake in a sample of Kuwait University students to determine its relationship with gender, body weight, college affiliation, and family monthly income and to explore perceived barriers to eating F/V. The median total F/V intake was 2.06, and the median intake of F/V without fries was even lower. Significant gender differences were found in intakes of fruit juice and the percentage of juice from fruit intake, with males consuming more servings per day compared to females. Male students were found to consume proportionately more fried potatoes of total vegetable intake when compared to females, whereas female students were found to consume more vegetables without fries than males. Taste, inconvenience, and lack of knowledge on F/V intake recommendations and preparation methods were among the main barriers to consuming more F/V. College students require encouragement to consume more F/V through targeted campaigns to increase awareness of recommendations, health benefits, and ways to incorporate F/V in their daily diet.

2005 ◽  
Vol 49 (4) ◽  
pp. 236-245 ◽  
Author(s):  
Agneta Yngve ◽  
Alexandra Wolf ◽  
Eric Poortvliet ◽  
Ibrahim Elmadfa ◽  
Johannes Brug ◽  
...  

2014 ◽  
Vol 17 (11) ◽  
pp. 2436-2444 ◽  
Author(s):  
Christel Lynch ◽  
Asa Gudrun Kristjansdottir ◽  
Saskia J te Velde ◽  
Nanna Lien ◽  
Eva Roos ◽  
...  

AbstractObjectiveTo describe fruit and vegetable intake of 11-year-old children in ten European countries and compare it with current dietary guidelines.DesignCross-sectional survey. Intake was assessed using a previously validated questionnaire containing a pre-coded 24 h recall and an FFQ which were completed in the classroom. Portion sizes were calculated using a standardized protocol.SettingSurveys were performed in schools regionally selected in eight countries and nationally representative in two countries.SubjectsA total of 8158 children from 236 schools across Europe participating in the PRO GREENS project.ResultsThe total mean consumption of fruit and vegetables was between 220 and 345 g/d in the ten participating countries. Mean intakes did not reach the WHO population goal of ≥400 g/d in any of the participating countries. Girls had a significantly higher intake of total fruit and vegetables than boys in five of the countries (Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Bulgaria and Slovenia). Mean total fruit intake ranged between 114 and 240 g/d and vegetable intake between 73 and 141 g/d. When using the level ≥400 g/d as a cut-off, only 23·5 % (13·8–37·0 %) of the studied children, depending on country and gender, met the WHO recommendation (fruit juice excluded).ConclusionsFruit and vegetable consumption was below recommended levels among the schoolchildren in all countries and vegetable intake was lower than fruit intake. The survey shows that there is a need for promotional activities to improve fruit and vegetable consumption in this age group.


2021 ◽  
Vol 20 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Emalie Rosewarne ◽  
Joseph Alvin Santos ◽  
Annet Hoek ◽  
Carley Grimes ◽  
Caryl Nowson ◽  
...  

Abstract Background Diets low in fruit and vegetables and high in salt are among the top dietary risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Using a nationally representative sample of Australians, this study aimed to describe self-reported intake of fruit and vegetables, and knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to salt intake, and determine if there were socio-demographic differences between population subgroups. Methods A 2016 cross-sectional survey of Australian adults aged 18 years and over, which comprised 160 questions, including socio-demographic and health-related questions. Descriptive statistics (mean, 95% confidence interval, %) were calculated. Weighted-adjusted logistic regression models were used to determine if there were socio-demographic differences in salt behaviours and fruit and vegetable consumption. Results A total of 1217 participants completed the survey (51% female). Less than 8% of participants reported consuming the recommended 2 or more serves of fruit and 5 or more serves of vegetables. Almost 60% of participants frequently added salt during cooking/meal preparation and 42% of respondents frequently placed a salt-shaker on the table at mealtimes. There were no consistent patterns between socio-demographic factors and measures of fruit and vegetable consumption and salt behaviours. Differences in at least one measure were found for sex, age, location, education level and weight category. Conclusions There were no consistent patterns between socio-demographic factors and salt behaviours and fruit and vegetable intake. Less than recommended intakes of fruit and vegetables and frequent discretionary salt use are placing Australians at risk of diet-related NCDs. Broad population-based policies and programs to improve fruit and vegetable intake and salt behaviours are needed to improve Australian’s diets.


2005 ◽  
Vol 49 (4) ◽  
pp. 246-254 ◽  
Author(s):  
Alexandra Wolf ◽  
Agneta Yngve ◽  
Ibrahim Elmadfa ◽  
Eric Poortvliet ◽  
Bettina Ehrenblad ◽  
...  

Food Research ◽  
2020 ◽  
Vol 4 (S2) ◽  
pp. 1451-1460 ◽  
Author(s):  
A.S Ahmad Sirfan ◽  
A.H. Hamirudin ◽  
S. Sidek

The low intake of fruits and vegetables is a global issue. This research aimed to determine the association of fruit and vegetable intake with waist circumference and barriers of intake. A total of 279 female students from the International Islamic University Malaysia, Kuantan, were recruited through convenience sampling and provided with a set of questionnaires to identify their fruits and vegetable intake. The waist circumference of respondents was measured. The majority of students consumed only one serving of fruit and vegetable per day, which is less than the levels recommended by the Malaysian Dietary Guideline. Only 9.0% of students had a fruits intake of two servings/day, while 6.5% had a vegetable intake of three servings/day which meets the recommendation. There was no significant association of fruits and vegetable intake with waist circumference among female students. Non-availability and not delicious were identified as major barriers to fruit and vegetable consumption respectively. In conclusion, the fruit and vegetable intake among the majority of female university students is inadequate. Thus, there is a need to increase awareness and develop strategies to promote adequate fruit and vegetable intake among this specific target group.


2020 ◽  
Vol 23 (5) ◽  
pp. 924-934
Author(s):  
Nicole van den Bogerd ◽  
Herman Peppelenbos ◽  
Roos Leufkens ◽  
Jacob C Seidell ◽  
Jolanda Maas ◽  
...  

AbstractObjective:To investigate the effects of providing free fruit and snack vegetables at a university on students’ fruit intake, snack vegetable intake and total vegetable intake.Design:Free fruit and raw snack vegetables (e.g. bite-sized tomatoes) were provided in a stand in the form of a miniature wooden house located in the central hall of the university’s main building, which students regularly pass through on their way to lectures and the cafeteria. Three interventions tested with a pre-test/post-test design were performed. In these three interventions, small changes to the appearance of the stand were made, such as placing potted plants around it. Demographic characteristics and fruit and vegetable intakes were assessed with questionnaires.Setting:A Dutch university of applied science.Participants:Intervention 1 included 124 students; Intervention 2 included ninety-two students; Intervention 3 included 237 students.Results:Longitudinal linear regression analyses showed that post-test snack vegetable intake was consistently higher compared with pre-test. In the three interventions, post-test snack vegetable intakes were between 11 and 14 g/d higher than at the pre-test, which is comparable to three bite-sized tomatoes. No differences in fruit intake or total vegetable intake were found. Subgroup analyses showed that, in all three interventions, students with the lowest pre-test fruit intake and total vegetable intake reported the largest increase in fruit intake and snack vegetable intake after the interventions.Conclusions:Providing free fruit and vegetables to students at their university might be beneficial for those with low habitual intakes.


2020 ◽  
Vol 4 (Supplement_2) ◽  
pp. 285-285
Author(s):  
Michaela Sossamon ◽  
Derek Miketinas

Abstract Objectives The purpose of this cross-sectional analysis is to explore baseline findings on the relationships between food security, fruit and vegetable availability, and fruit and vegetable intake in elementary children and their parents before the start of a school-garden program. Methods Third-grade students (n = 154) and their parents were recruited from a Texas elementary school that participates in a school-garden program. Prior to the start of the program, student participants along with one of their parents completed the National Cancer Institute's All-Day Screener to assess fruit, juice, and vegetable intake. Parent participants also completed other validated questionnaires to assess home availability of fruits and vegetables and food security. Regression and ANOVA were used to examine the relationships between food security, fruit and vegetable availability at home, and fruit and vegetable intake in parent and student participants. Results A total of 64 students provided consent, and 39 students (∼58% female), each with one parent (∼97% female), completed the questionnaires. Parents who reported low food security had significantly greater total fruit and vegetable intake (4.7 servings/day) along with their children (6.0 servings/day) compared with parents (2.8 servings/day) and children (3.3 servings/day) with high food security. Fruit availability at home was positively correlated with fruit intake in parents (β = 0.18; P = .0261; R2 = 0.13; ) but not children (P = .8931). No significant associations were found between vegetable availability and vegetable intake in student or parent participants. Conclusions These baseline findings indicate greater fruit and vegetable intake for children and parents with low food security, which may be due to differences in fruit intake rather than vegetable intake. Although greater fruit intake was associated with fruit availability in the home for parents, this association was not observed for children. Funding Sources None.


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