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2022 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Sarah B. Cohn

Purpose This study aims to detail an analysis project of a juvenile collection within an academic library. The analysis became a starting point for the development of a coherent collection policy, and for charting a path toward a better maintained, more used, more diverse, inclusive and representative collection. Design/methodology/approach The analysis was done by using a catalog-generated shelf list, which revealed specific details about the aged state of the collection and brought to light the lack of attention the collection has been getting in recent years. Findings The analysis of a collection of children’s books in an academic library revealed a collection long out of date and unable to serve the needs of our user population. Research limitations/implications This analysis is specific to academic institutions that have collections of children’s material. Originality/value The literature on juvenile collections in academic libraries is relatively sparse. This research details a social justice approach to building and maintaining juvenile collections in academic libraries.


2022 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Jon Ezell ◽  
J.J. Pionke ◽  
Jeremy Gunnoe

Purpose This paper aims to contribute to an understanding of current accessibility efforts and practice in librarianship by providing a broad overview of the information about services, resources and facilities on academic library accessibility pages. By compiling and analyzing data from 85 libraries, this study seeks to facilitate comparisons between current and past accessibility practice and to provide perspective on how libraries communicate to users about accessibility efforts across libraries.Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted a content analysis of 85 library accessibility pages from a sample population of 98 institutions, consisting of all members institutions of four US academic library consortia. Pages were coded for content elements regarding services, facilities, collections, staffing, assistive technologies and general information. Webpage features, architecture and accessibility/functionality were also assessed.Findings Libraries have broadened and strengthened efforts to publicize/provide services and resources to functionally diverse users. Pages most commonly prioritize information about assistive technologies, services and facilities. Pages varied greatly in size, complexity and detail, but public institutions' pages were more prevalent and informative than their private counterparts. Libraries can work to foreground accessibility pages and increase transparency and evidence of currency to improve communication to their users.Originality/value This study provides a large-scale content analysis of library accessibility webpages. It allows for comparison of the features and information most commonly featured on these important online points of service.


2022 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Andrew Cox ◽  
Liz Brewster

PurposeTo discover how UK academic libraries sought to support student mental health and well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.Design/methodology/approachThe data was from a 24-question survey of UK universities distributed in May 2021 which received 56 responses from 47 different Higher Education Institution libraries. Descriptive statistics are combined with thematic analysis of open text comments.FindingsLibraries were undertaking a wide range of activities, targeted chiefly at students and broadcast via Twitter, other social media and library web sites. The problem being addressed was the stresses of studying in the context of the pivot online and isolation caused by social distancing. Digital well-being seemed also to be an increased concern. COVID-19 had proved the value of digital support but created a number of challenges such as loss of physical space, communication barriers and lack of extra resource. The role had a somewhat informal place in the organisation. Overall library activities were aligned but not strongly integrated into institutional efforts.Research limitations/implicationsThis was a study in one specific national context with a relatively limited number of total responses. There could be a non-response bias where respondents were doing more than was typical in the sector.Originality/valueThe paper is one of the first papers to gather sector wide data and move beyond case studies of what individual libraries due to support to mental health and well-being. It also offers a case study of the impacts of COVID-19 on management pointing to its catalysing the digital shift, creating constraints on resources and communication and prompting the emergence of staff well-being as a consideration in management decision making.


2022 ◽  
Author(s):  
Shumaila Iqbal ◽  
Naveed Ikram ◽  
salma Imtiaz ◽  
Saima Imtiaz

Abstract Usability of a Web Based Library Systems (WBLS) is a major quality attribute. Checklists have become common and easy method to evaluate the usability of these WBLS; however the available checklists support evaluation of general usability aspects of WBLS only. The domain specific usability aspects are required to maximize the usability for such systems. This research proposes and validates a checklist based usability evaluation method that supports the evaluation of general as well as specific usability aspects of WBLS. The usability evaluation checklist is proposed based on analysis of literature and data of a controlled experiment. The checklist is validated in comparison to the “Academic Library Website Evaluation Checklist” via another controlled experiment. The proposed checklist is applied to the WBLS of universities in Pakistan. The manual and statistical result shows that, the proposed usability evaluation checklist identifies more general and specific usability aspects. It is found that both the checklists are equally efficient while identifying the usability errors. The proposed checklist is beneficial for the academia as well as industry to evaluate the usability of WBLS to an optimal level.


2022 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Yong Jeong Yi ◽  
Barun Hwang ◽  
Donghun Kim

Purpose To better respond to user needs for personalized information services in the context of academic libraries, this study aims at developing a prototype to provide mobile curation services by using the concept of content curation. Design/methodology/approach This study used a mobile application software development process, which consisted of five phases: user and organizational requirements, architecture design, navigation design, page design and implementation and usability testing. Usability testing was conducted with a total of 20 college students by online surveys at a university. Findings Meta-analysis identified key user needs: diversification of services, more personalized services, active communication with librarians, quality improvement of information and interface improvement. User and organizational requirements derived four main service modules – namely, Curation Services, Live Chat, My Page and My Log. Usability testing regarding ease of use, perceived usefulness and satisfaction indicated that participants were satisfied with the prototype. Research limitations/implications The study extends the discussion of quality academic library services by introducing the concept of content curation that uses the advantages of mobile technologies to overcome existing limitations in library services insufficient for meeting individual user needs. Originality/value Although many studies have discussed mobile library services, few studies have focused on developing a system for such services. The model developed in the study fills the research gap. Above all, the key modules specified by the prototype – Curation Services, Live Chat, My Page and My Log services – are expected to improve existing research and learning support services currently offered by academic libraries.


2022 ◽  
Vol 62 (1) ◽  
pp. 101-109
Author(s):  
Russell Michalak ◽  
Monica D. T. Rysavy
Keyword(s):  

2022 ◽  
Vol 18 (1) ◽  
pp. 0-0

Knowledge can play an important role in ascertaining an organization’s competitive edge if the knowledge of employees is nurtured and utilized as an asset with a potential to improve service delivery. The study focused on knowledge sharing at the Thomas Mofolo Library in Lesotho to determine if knowledge sharing was being used to improve service delivery at the Library. A case study design that triangulated interviews and questionnaires was used in this study. Quantitative data was processed using software packages. Data from the interviews was analyzed through content analysis based on the objectives of the study. This study established that staff recognized the need to share knowledge. However, knowledge sharing occurred on an ad hoc basis. There was a limited use of technology-based and human-based mechanisms of sharing knowledge. The study suggests practical knowledge-sharing practices that may contribute to improved service delivery in a library setup. As a case study, study may also contribute to the development of theory about the phenomenon.


2022 ◽  
pp. 264-282
Author(s):  
Shipra Awasthi ◽  
Shiva Kanaujia Sukula

With the awareness and proliferation of technology, the smart approach is possible to build a learning system or a smart city. The study aims to present the involvement of digital literacy in academics, making youth smart citizens, and assessing the continuous efforts at different levels. The study highlighted the mechanisms adopted by the libraries, such as training and other programmes, to enhance the digital literacy of the citizens. The chapter spotlighted the inclusion of digital literacy in academics, and with the adoption of digital solutions, young learners can become smart citizens. It also throws light on the impact of digital literacy during COVID-19 and digital literacy activities at JNU Central Library. A glimpse of the practices and measures adopted by the academic libraries to enrich the youth to make them smart citizens is provided, and a case example of an academic library (i.e., Jawaharlal Nehru University [JNU] Central Library) is considered for the study. Digital literacy has become an integral part of the youths' lives, and it supplements in making youth smart citizens would lead to smart city development.


2022 ◽  
pp. 121-138
Author(s):  
Suchismita Majumdar

Extension and outreach services of libraries, archives, and museums (LAM) are to be essentially considered as an important aspect of social and ethical responsibility of an institution towards the society. An academic library, especially a college library, has immense scope for engagement of the community constituting the stakeholders of the institution for participation, involvement, skill development, and enrichment as well as the individuals outside the institution, ultimately towards inclusion, empathy, and compassion for the society at large. Exemplary evidences of the opportunities and accomplishments of a college library with special reference to the extension and outreach activities of Sir Gurudas Mahavidyalaya, Kolkata, West Bengal, India are provided. Innovation, collaboration, communication, creativity, and effective employment of ICT tools are the keys to successful execution.


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