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2022 ◽  
Vol 21 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Andy R. Cavagnetto ◽  
Joshua Premo ◽  
Zachary Coleman ◽  
Kate Juergens

The study examines the relationship between scientific accuracy of contributions, peer idea consideration, one’s ability to direct the conversation, and learning outcomes of students engaged in small-group work in an introductory undergraduate biology lab course.


Purpose: Investigate the ability of EFL learners’cohesion with small group writing activities compared to individual flipped instruction model through Whatsapp with individual writing activities Design/Method: A quasi-experimental study with a non-equivalent control group and a pre-test/post-test design was implemented to find any significant difference between the two combinations. The instrument of this study was a writing test. Findings: The findings revealed that the small group flipped classroom instruction model through Whatsapp with small group writing activities performed better than teaching cohesion with individual flipped instruction through Whatsapp with individual writing activities. Originality: Flipped classroom innovation has attracted English Language Teaching researchers’ attention to scrutinize its effectiveness.


Author(s):  
Yudhi Arifani

Purpose: Investigate the ability of EFL learners’cohesion with small group writing activities compared to individual flipped instruction model through Whatsapp with individual writing activities Design/Method: A quasi-experimental study with a non-equivalent control group and a pre-test/post-test design was implemented to find any significant difference between the two combinations. The instrument of this study was a writing test. Findings: The findings revealed that the small group flipped classroom instruction model through Whatsapp with small group writing activities performed better than teaching cohesion with individual flipped instruction through Whatsapp with individual writing activities. Originality: Flipped classroom innovation has attracted English Language Teaching researchers’ attention to scrutinize its effectiveness.


The Festivus ◽  
2022 ◽  
Vol 54 (1) ◽  
pp. 7-20
Author(s):  
Stephan Veldsman

A small group Marginellidae species were moved between genera several times by different authors, described as Marginella, sometimes called Glabella, classified under Dentimargo, and also reclassified as being Eratoidea species. This group of very small Marginellidae has their own unique shell characteristics within the family, and are described here within a new genus: Africosta. Four known species are discussed along with the description of two new species from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa within the new genus.


2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (S5) ◽  
Author(s):  
Safaa El Bialy ◽  
Mohammad Jay ◽  
Yamilee Hebert ◽  
Neraj Manhas ◽  
Dalia Karol

Lecture has historically been a core method used for content delivery in healthcare profession education. However, lecture attendance has decreased within the recent generations of students. The current study focus was to assess the medical and nursing students’ perceptions regarding lecture attendance. To assist with this, second year medical (110/320) and nursing students (95/215) were requested to answer a 10-item survey. The results show that the top reasons why medical and nursing students attended lectures, respectively included: “lectures were mandatory” (81.8% and 68.8%), “socializing with peers” (68.2% and 30.1%), and “professor emphasized important points” (67.3% and 90.3%).  While some reasons for students not attending lectures were that the lecture format was not effective (63.5% and 67.7%), students preferred to use recordings of the lectures (43.3% and 18.1%). Overall, 64.6% of medical students and 63.4% of nursing students agree that traditional lectures are an effective way of learning.  Sixty two percent of medical students (62% n=68) of medical students stated that traditional lectures is their preferred method of learning compared to flipped classroom (27%), small group learning (30%), and online learning (31%). While (39%) of nursing students stated that traditional lectures is their preferred method of learning compared to flipped classroom (21.5% ), small group learning (3.2%), and online learning (7.4%). The results suggest that there is variability in students’ preferred learning style. While some prefer the face-to-face interaction with the professor, other students favour studying at their own pace. The majority of medical and nursing students think traditional lectures continue to play a major educational role.


2022 ◽  
Author(s):  
Nuria Casquero‐Modrego ◽  
María Amparo Núñez‐Andrés ◽  
María José Iniesto‐Alba

Author(s):  
Florence M. F. Wong ◽  
Crystal W. Y. Kan

Background: Small group work embraces independent study and interactive learning, which enhance knowledge acquisition and skills. Self-directed learning (SDL) and problem-solving (PS) are essential skills in the development of the nursing profession. During the coronavirus pandemic, virtual learning was indispensable. However, little is known about how students develop SDL and PS abilities through online learning through group work. Objective: To evaluate the effects of the online intervention on SDL and PS abilities through interactive group work. Methods: A randomised waitlist-control trial was carried out. A structured intervention using problem-based learning (PBL) as a guideline was used to direct student learning in small group work. Assessments were scheduled at Time 0 (baseline), Time 1 (8th week), Time 2 (16th week), and Time 3 (28th week). Results: The mean student age was 21.45 (SD = 0.86). About 78% of students were female. There was no significant difference in demographic characteristics and analysis at the baseline. Students in the intervention group reported greater improvement in the SDLRS and PSI at the 8th week, whereas those in the waitlist control group reported greater improvement in the SDLRS and PSI at the 16th week. Sustained effects in the SDLRS and PSI were observed in both the intervention and waitlist control groups at the 16th and 28th weeks, respectively. A repeated-measure analysis was performed to compare the SDLRS and PSI in different periods and revealed statistically significant results (p < 0.001) in all subscales of SDLRS and PSI in the four study periods. Conclusions: The guidelines appear to be an effective treatment for SDL and PS ability enhancement with sustainable effects through interactive group work. The guidelines with explicit instructions and learning objectives provide directions and guidance to students to learn more effectively. The educator plays a vital role in facilitating the students’ SDL and PS ability improvement.


Author(s):  
Huabo Wang ◽  
Edward Prochownik

Among the first discovered and most prominent cellular oncogenes is MYC, which encodes a bHLH-ZIP transcription factor (Myc) that both activates and suppresses numerous genes involved in proliferation, energy production, metabolism and translation. Myc belongs to a small group of bHLH-ZIP transcriptional regulators (the Myc Network) that includes its obligate heterodimerization partner Max and six &ldquo;Mxd proteins&rdquo; (Mxd1-4, Mnt and Mga) each of which heterodimerizes with Max and largely oppose Myc&rsquo;s functions. More recently, a second group of bHLH-ZIP proteins (the Mlx Network) has emerged. It is comprised of the Myc-like factors ChREBP and MondoA, which, in association with the Max-like member Mlx, regulate smaller and more functionally restricted sets of target genes, some of which are shared with Myc. Opposing ChREBP and MondoA are heterodimers comprised of Mlx and Mxd1, Mxd4 and Mnt, which also structurally and operationally link the two Networks. We discuss here the functions of these &ldquo;Extended Myc Network&rdquo; members with particular emphasis on the roles played by Max, Mlx and Mxd proteins in suppressing normal and neoplastic growth. These roles are complex due to the temporally- and tissue-restricted expression of Extended Myc Network proteins in normal cells, their regulation of both common and unique target genes and, in some cases, their functional redundancy.


2022 ◽  
Vol 12 ◽  
Author(s):  
Xuejiao Cheng ◽  
Han Xie ◽  
Jianzhong Hong ◽  
Guanghua Bao ◽  
Zhiqiang Liu

Teacher's emotions have been shown to be highly important in the quality and effectiveness of teaching and learning. There is a recognized need to examine the essential role of teacher's emotions in students' academic achievement. However, the influence of teacher's displays of emotions on students' outcomes in small-group interaction activities, especially in the online environment, has received little attention in prior research. The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between teacher's different emotional displays and students' perceptions of the teacher's competence, as well as students' collaborative feelings and productivity in online small-group discussions. Using a three-level between-subjects design, 74 participants were randomly divided into four-member groups comprising a teacher and three other participants. All the groups were asked to discuss an open-ended realistic problem using online software, during which the teacher's display of emotions varied (positive vs. negative vs. neutral). The participants' self-reported questionnaire data (perception of the teacher's competence, students' feeling of pleasure, collaborative satisfaction, and willingness to continue collaborating) and productivity (number of effective ideas expressed within a given time) were measured to compare the participants who were exposed to different emotional displays. As expected, the results showed that the participants who received the teacher's positive emotional display reported that they experienced higher levels of pleasure during the task. However, in contrast to our expectations, those under the negative emotional display condition showed a significantly higher level of productivity in the group task. In addition, compared to emotional display, the participants' perceptions of the teacher's competence were rated significantly higher under the neutral condition, and they reported higher levels of collaborative satisfaction and greater willingness to continue collaborating with their group. The findings have the potential benefit of informing educational practice on whether teachers should display their emotions in a small-group discussion or how they should display emotions following adjustment for the relative aim of the teaching activities.


PRiMER ◽  
2022 ◽  
Vol 6 ◽  
Author(s):  
Lauren J. Germain ◽  
Hsin H. Li ◽  
Amen Wiqas ◽  
Lauren Zahn ◽  
Telisa M. Stewart ◽  
...  

Introduction: While studies report positive correlations between students’ perceptions of the learning environment and their reported self-efficacy, the role of peer assessment is poorly understood in this context. This study examines the process and impact of peer assessment on self-efficacy and perceptions of the learning environment during a small-group discussion-based course required of first-year medical students. Methods: After spending time in small-group learning, students completed three peer assessments and reviewed three assessments of themselves. Analysis of the peer assessments included thematic coding of comments and word counts. Prior to and following the assessment period, students completed a survey including the Generalized Self-efficacy (GSE) Scale, and six locally-developed questions regarding the learning environment and perceptions of peer assessment. We performed paired-sample t tests to determine whether there were differences between the pre- and post-peer assessment surveys. The SUNY Upstate Institutional Review Board reviewed the study and determined it to be exempt. Results: Peer assessment narratives referred most commonly to students’ participation style and the need for greater participation. Word counts ranged widely. A paired sample t test indicated that the difference between pre and post peer assessment GSE scores was significant (P=.009), but the effect size was small (d=0.32). Perceptions of the learning environment did not change after the peer assessments. Conclusion: Peer assessment offers a potential strategy for enhancing self-efficacy in medical school small-group learning environments and requires few resources to implement, relative to the potential benefits.


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