Team Formation
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2022 ◽  
Vol 9 (1) ◽  
pp. 46-47
Author(s):  
Elizabeth A Rider ◽  
Deborah D. Navedo ◽  
William T. Branch, Jr.

Introduction: The capacity of healthcare professionals to work collaboratively influences faculty and trainees’ professional identity formation, well-being, and care quality. Part of a multi-institutional project*, we created the Faculty Fellowship for Leaders in Humanistic Interprofessional Education at Boston Children’s Hospital/ Harvard Medical School. We aimed to foster trusting relationships, reflective abilities, collaboration skills, and work together to promote humanistic values within learning environments. Objective: To examine the impact of the faculty fellowship from participants’ reports of “the most important thing learned”. Methods: We studied participants’ reflections after each of 16 1½ hour fellowship sessions. Curriculum content included: highly functioning teams, advanced team formation, diversity/inclusion, values, wellbeing/renewal/burnout, appreciative inquiry, narrative reflection, and others. Responses to “What was the most important thing you learned?” were analyzed qualitatively using a positivistic deductive approach. Results: Participants completed 136 reflections over 16 sessions–77% response rate (136/176). Cohort was 91% female; mean age 52.6 (range 32-65); mean years since completion of highest degree 21.4; 64% held doctorates, 36% master’s degrees. 46% were physicians, 27% nurses, 18% social workers, 9% psychologists. 27% participated previously in a learning experience focusing on interprofessional education, collaboration or practice. Most important learning included: Relational capacities/ Use of self in relationships 96/131 (73%); Attention to values 46/131 (35%); Reflection/ Self-awareness 44/131 (34%); Fostering humanistic learning environments 21/131 (16%). Discussion: Results revealed the importance of enhancing relational capacities and use of self in relationships including handling emotions; attention to values; reflection/self-awareness and recognition of assumptions; and fostering humanistic learning environments. These topics should receive more emphasis in interprofessional faculty development programs and may help identify teaching priorities. *Supported in part by a multi-institutional grant from the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation (Dr. Branch as PI; Dr. Rider as site PI).


2021 ◽  
Vol 2 (2) ◽  
pp. 90-104
Author(s):  
Ismail Efendy ◽  
Mappeaty Nyorong ◽  
Himmah Himmah

The Regulation of the Minister of Health of Indonesia Number 44 of 2016 provides guidelines for puskesmas so that they can apply the puskesmas management pattern properly and correctly. The initial data obtained by the Pegasing Health Center has not fully implemented the Regulation of the Minister of Health of the Republic of Indonesia Number 44 of 2016 concerning management guidelines. The purpose of the study was to analyze the implementation of the Minister of Health Regulation Number 44 of 2016 concerning Public Health Center management at Pegasing Public Health Center, Central Aceh Regency. The research design used qualitative methods. The informant was the head of the puskesmas, the head of administration, the head of the admin, the head of the UKP, and the head of the UKM. The data were analyzed through the stages of reduction, data presentation and drawing conclusions. The results showed that planning, mobilization and implementation, monitoring control and performance appraisal were not carried out according to the Minister of Health No. 44 of 2016, the commitment was there but not all staff knew, the management team had not been formed, there was still a lack of staff awareness regarding the Minister of Health No. 44 of 2016. The conclusion of this study is that the Minister of Health Regulation No. 44 of 2016 does not work, organizational commitment has not been socialized, there is no management team formation, lack of concern, lack of solid team work. lack of staff knowledge and employee responsibilities.


Author(s):  
Daniel MBURASEK ◽  
Odon MUSIMBI

Efficient team formation presents challenges both for the industry and the academia, especially among first year students. In academia, the difficulty is due to a lack of familiarity between instructors and new students at the beginning of each semester while in the industry, the issue is the incomplete picture of new employee’s personality by the supervisors. The quality of the team greatly affects both the team member experience as well as the outcome of assigned projects. There is a strong need to create a tool or a program that allows instructors and supervisors to create effective teams with evenly distributed skills amongst the teams in a timely fashion. Studies show that the balance of skills, rather than the presence of highly skilled individuals, leads to successful teams. The ultimate goal is to create a tool that will give teams the opportunity to operate at their maximum potential. This paper focuses on the creation of teams for first year students of engineering. The outcome is based on the results of a project assigned to a team of second year engineering students. The choice of second year students was dictated by the need to have students who had already experienced the adverse effects of malfunctioning teams during their previous projects. The goal of the project was to design a software and user interface for a tool that instructors could use to create optimal project teams in an efficient manner.


PLoS ONE ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 16 (12) ◽  
pp. e0259786
Author(s):  
Muhammad Zubair Rehman ◽  
Kamal Z. Zamli ◽  
Mubarak Almutairi ◽  
Haruna Chiroma ◽  
Muhammad Aamir ◽  
...  

Team formation (TF) in social networks exploits graphs (i.e., vertices = experts and edges = skills) to represent a possible collaboration between the experts. These networks lead us towards building cost-effective research teams irrespective of the geolocation of the experts and the size of the dataset. Previously, large datasets were not closely inspected for the large-scale distributions & relationships among the researchers, resulting in the algorithms failing to scale well on the data. Therefore, this paper presents a novel TF algorithm for expert team formation called SSR-TF based on two metrics; communication cost and graph reduction, that will become a basis for future TF’s. In SSR-TF, communication cost finds the possibility of collaboration between researchers. The graph reduction scales the large data to only appropriate skills and the experts, resulting in real-time extraction of experts for collaboration. This approach is tested on five organic and benchmark datasets, i.e., UMP, DBLP, ACM, IMDB, and Bibsonomy. The SSR-TF algorithm is able to build cost-effective teams with the most appropriate experts–resulting in the formation of more communicative teams with high expertise levels.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Yashar Najaflou

<p>The growth of social networks in modern information systems has enabled the collaboration of experts at an unprecedented scale. Given a social network and a task consisting of a set of required skills, Team Formation (TF) aims at finding a team of experts who can cover the required skills and can communicate in an effective manner. However, this definition has been interpreted as the problem of finding teams with minimum communication cost which neglects two aspect of team formation in real life. The first is that in reality experts are multi-skilled, hence communication cost cannot be a fixed value and should vary according to the channels employed. The second ignored aspect is disregarding teams with high expertise level who can still satisfy the required communication level.  To tackle above mentioned issues, I introduce a dynamic formof communication for multi-facet relationships and use it to devise a novel approach called Chemistry Oriented Team Formation (ChemoTF) based on two new metrics; Chemistry Level and Expertise Level. Chemistry Level measures scale of communication required by the task andExpertise Level measures the overall expertise among potential teams filtered by Chemistry Level. Moreover, I adopt a personnel cost metric to filter costly teams. The experimental results on the corpus compiled for this purpose suggests that ChemoTF returns communicative and cost-effective teams with the highest expertise level compared to state-of-the-art algorithms. The corpus itself is a valuable output which contains comprehensive scholarly information in the field of computer science.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Yashar Najaflou

<p>The growth of social networks in modern information systems has enabled the collaboration of experts at an unprecedented scale. Given a social network and a task consisting of a set of required skills, Team Formation (TF) aims at finding a team of experts who can cover the required skills and can communicate in an effective manner. However, this definition has been interpreted as the problem of finding teams with minimum communication cost which neglects two aspect of team formation in real life. The first is that in reality experts are multi-skilled, hence communication cost cannot be a fixed value and should vary according to the channels employed. The second ignored aspect is disregarding teams with high expertise level who can still satisfy the required communication level.  To tackle above mentioned issues, I introduce a dynamic formof communication for multi-facet relationships and use it to devise a novel approach called Chemistry Oriented Team Formation (ChemoTF) based on two new metrics; Chemistry Level and Expertise Level. Chemistry Level measures scale of communication required by the task andExpertise Level measures the overall expertise among potential teams filtered by Chemistry Level. Moreover, I adopt a personnel cost metric to filter costly teams. The experimental results on the corpus compiled for this purpose suggests that ChemoTF returns communicative and cost-effective teams with the highest expertise level compared to state-of-the-art algorithms. The corpus itself is a valuable output which contains comprehensive scholarly information in the field of computer science.</p>


Author(s):  
N. V. Buzhinskaya ◽  
E. S. Vaseva

The competitiveness of a modern university graduate is determined by his professional knowledge and skills, personal qualities, as well as the ability to make decisions, plan and organize work, and fulfill his role in team activities. Formation of the student’s ability to fulfill his role in a team is a general requirement for the training of a specialist in any field. The process of preparing university students for competitive events has great potential for the development of teamwork competencies. The aim of the study was to consider the specifics of preparing students for competitive events in the aspect of the approach of uniting students into teams. The peculiarities of preparing students for competitive programming in case of role-based and interpersonal methods of team formation were considered. The study used methods of observation, interviewing and questioning. The results of the study showed that the rolebased approach is more conducive to the development of student independence, the ability to make decisions, be responsible for the consequences of decisions, while the interpersonal approach allows to create conditions for the formation of team members’ ability to respond flexibly to changing circumstances. Thus, we can conclude about the various didactic possibilities of using role-based and interpersonal approaches to team building, about the need to use different methods for determining the composition of team members to solve educational problems in the learning process.


Author(s):  
Sami Koivunen ◽  
Ekaterina Olshannikova ◽  
Thomas Olsson

AbstractThe team composition of a project team is an essential determinant of the success of innovation projects that aim to produce novel solution ideas. Team assembly is essentially complex and sensitive decision-making, yet little supported by information technology (IT). In order to design appropriate digital tools for team assembly, and team formation more broadly, we call for profoundly understanding the practices and principles of matchmakers who manually assemble teams in specific contexts. This paper reports interviews with 13 expert matchmakers who are regularly assembling multidisciplinary innovation teams in various organizational environments in Finland. Based on qualitative analysis of their experiences, we provide insights into their established practices and principles in team assembly. We conceptualize and describe common tactical approaches on different typical levels of team assembly, including arranging approaches like “key-skills-first”, “generalist-first” and “topic-interest-first”, and balancing approaches like “equally-skilled-teams” and “high-expertise-teams”. The reported empirical insights can help to design IT systems that support team assembly according to different tactics.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Federica Lucia Vinella ◽  
Ioanna Lykourentzou ◽  
Judith Masthoff

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