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2021 ◽  
Vol 25 (1) ◽  
pp. 175-211
Author(s):  
Anu Kannike ◽  
Jana Reidla

The main museums in Estonia and Latvia have lately staged new exhibitions that proceed from a contemporary museological approach and reflect the results of historical research. The article compares three cases which present alternative but complementary interpretations of the Soviet period. The authors pay special attention to the application of the biographical method prominent in contemporary cultural research, and the museological method of multivocality. They conclude that in the case of multivocality, effectively addressing different visitor groups is a great challenge to curators. There is a risk that the simplified mediation of contradictory memories and views will leave a gap for visitors with less prior knowledge about the subject of the exhibition. In large exhibition teams, the curator has a crucial role to play in negotiating with team members to prevent the concept from dispersing. In the cases studied, it is possible to observe the curators’ views and detect a similar attempt to interpret complex topics through biographies. The analysis concludes that in the context of contemporary museological approaches, the voice of the curator remains essential, especially when mediating exhibits, for they cannot speak for themselves.


Author(s):  
Setria Feri ◽  

This article is a literature review that discusses the effect of diversity on the occurrence of team conflict and how emotion al intelligence role as a moderating variable to improve team performance. Diversity may trigger relationship conflicts within the team that affect their performance. However, not all diversity has a negative impact if the organization concerned can create a cohesiv e team. Team members with higher levels of expertise on the team should be given more influence over team processes and outcomes. Organizational support and openness have different effects on the relationship of diversity to the occurrence of conflict within the organiz ation. The emotional intelligence of team members was found to play an important role in reducing the negative effects that might be trigg ered by diversity. Emotionally intelligent team members are generally more capable of dealing with differences. Thus, they are more aware of the creative potential of their different thoughts, values, and beliefs. In conclusion, one of the efforts to improve team performance is to reduce or prevent conflicts within the team through emotional intelligence.


Author(s):  
Dr. Ishita Attri ◽  

Majority of healthcare professionals are struggling with conducting and writing a protocol for a research study. Thus, the purpose of this article is to summarize significant steps and necessary guidelines for producing a standard research protocol, roles and responsibilities of various team members involved in the study, and conduction of actual clinical trial including its initiation, phases (I-III), termination or post-marketing surveillance phase. It is important to note that the quality of a clinical trial largely depends on the protocol to achieve success in the research study.


2021 ◽  
Vol 1 ◽  
pp. 1-11
Author(s):  
Roma Sendyka

“Sites of Violence and their Communities” presents the results of a research project that brought together scholars and practitioners of memory work in an attempt to critically reinterpret the links between sites, their (human, and non-human) users, and memory. These interdisciplinary discussions focused on overlooked, repressed or ignored sites of violence that may benefit from new approaches to memory studies, approaches that go beyond the traditional focus on communication, symbolism, representation and communality. Clandestine or contested sites, in particular, pose challenging questions about memory practices and policies: about the status of unacknowledged victims and those who witnessed their deaths; about those who have inherited the position of “bystander”; about the ontology of human remains; and about the ontologies of the sites themselves, with the natural and communal environments implicated in their perdurance. Claude Lanzmann – one of the first to undertake rigorous research on abandoned, uncommemorated or clandestine sites of violence – responded to Pierre Nora’s seminal conception with his work and with the critical notion of “non-lieux de mémoire.” Methodologies emerging from more traditional as well as recently introduced perspectives (like forensic, ecological, and material ones) allowed team members to engage with such “non-sites of memory” from new angles. The goal was to consider the needs and interests of post-conflict societies; to identify and critically read unofficial transmissions of memory; and to re-locate memory in new contexts – in the grassroots of social, political and institutional processes where the human, post-human and natural merge with unanticipated mnemonic dynamics.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Mawarny Md. Rejab

<p>Agile software development projects rely on the diversity of team members’ expertise. This expertise, however, is not adequate on its own: it is important to leverage available expertise through expertise coordination. Expertise coordination requires team members to rely on each other for recognizing who has particular expertise, when and where they are needed, and how to access the expertise effectively. Agile teams also need to rely on outside expertise such as user experience designers, architects, and database administrators. This thesis presents a theory of expertise coordination in Agile Software Development projects. We employed semi-structured interviews, observations, and document analysis in a Grounded Theory study involving 48 Agile practitioners and external specialists. This study discovered three main categories of expertise coordination: processes of expertise coordination, strategies of managing external expertise, and management roles in supporting expertise coordination. The theory provides a new insight into how Agile teams coordinate internal and external expertise, how they utilize external specialists and outsourcers’ expertise, and how management can support expertise coordination.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Mawarny Md. Rejab

<p>Agile software development projects rely on the diversity of team members’ expertise. This expertise, however, is not adequate on its own: it is important to leverage available expertise through expertise coordination. Expertise coordination requires team members to rely on each other for recognizing who has particular expertise, when and where they are needed, and how to access the expertise effectively. Agile teams also need to rely on outside expertise such as user experience designers, architects, and database administrators. This thesis presents a theory of expertise coordination in Agile Software Development projects. We employed semi-structured interviews, observations, and document analysis in a Grounded Theory study involving 48 Agile practitioners and external specialists. This study discovered three main categories of expertise coordination: processes of expertise coordination, strategies of managing external expertise, and management roles in supporting expertise coordination. The theory provides a new insight into how Agile teams coordinate internal and external expertise, how they utilize external specialists and outsourcers’ expertise, and how management can support expertise coordination.</p>


2021 ◽  
Vol 109 (4) ◽  
Author(s):  
Laura Menard ◽  
Chelsea Misquith

Background: Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) is a telehealth initiative that aims to reduce disparities in delivery of health care by leveraging technology and local expertise to provide guidance on specialized subjects to health care providers across the world. In 2018, a new ECHO hub convened in Indianapolis with a focus on health care for individuals in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer (LGBTQ+) populations. This ECHO iteration was one of the first of its kind and would soon be followed by a new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) ECHO as well.Case Presentation: In a novel approach, information professionals participated in the early planning stages of the formation of these ECHO teams, which enabled the provision of real-time medical evidence and resources at the point-of-need once the teams were launched. This case study demonstrates proof of concept for including health sciences librarians and/or information professionals in the ECHO as hub team members. In this case study, the authors describe and quantify the value added to the HIV and LGBTQ+ ECHO sessions by the medical librarians, as well as provide a template for how other telehealth initiatives can collaborate with their local health information professionals.Conclusions: Librarian involvement in Project ECHO over the past three years has been enthusiastically received. The librarians have contributed hundreds of resources to ECHO participants, helped build and curate resource repositories, and expanded the embedded librarian program to an additional two ECHO iterations. ECHO hub team members report high rates of satisfaction with the performance of embedded librarians and appreciate the provision of point-of-need evidence to ECHO participants.


Author(s):  
N. V. Buzhinskaya ◽  
E. S. Vaseva

The competitiveness of a modern university graduate is determined by his professional knowledge and skills, personal qualities, as well as the ability to make decisions, plan and organize work, and fulfill his role in team activities. Formation of the student’s ability to fulfill his role in a team is a general requirement for the training of a specialist in any field. The process of preparing university students for competitive events has great potential for the development of teamwork competencies. The aim of the study was to consider the specifics of preparing students for competitive events in the aspect of the approach of uniting students into teams. The peculiarities of preparing students for competitive programming in case of role-based and interpersonal methods of team formation were considered. The study used methods of observation, interviewing and questioning. The results of the study showed that the rolebased approach is more conducive to the development of student independence, the ability to make decisions, be responsible for the consequences of decisions, while the interpersonal approach allows to create conditions for the formation of team members’ ability to respond flexibly to changing circumstances. Thus, we can conclude about the various didactic possibilities of using role-based and interpersonal approaches to team building, about the need to use different methods for determining the composition of team members to solve educational problems in the learning process.


2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Mohammad Abdul Latif ◽  
Jan Vang ◽  
Rebeca Sultana

PurposeVoice role identification and the psychosocial voice barriers represented by implicit voice theories (IVTs) affect lean team members' prosocial voice behavior and thereby lean team performance. This paper investigates how role definition and IVTs influence individual lean team-members' prosocial voice behavior during lean implementation.Design/methodology/approachThis research was conducted in four case readymade garment (RMG) factories in Bangladesh following a mixed-method research approach dominated by a qualitative research methodology. Under the mixed-method design, this research followed multiple research strategies, including intervention-based action research and case studies.FindingsThe findings suggest that voice role perception affects the voice behavior of the individual lean team members. The findings also demonstrate that voice role definition significantly influences individually held implicit voice beliefs in lean teams.Research limitations/implicationsThis research was conducted in four sewing lines in four RMG factories in Bangladesh. There is a need for a cross-sector and cross-country large-scale study that follows the quantitative research methods in different contexts.Practical implicationsThis research contributes to the operations management literature, especially in lean manufacturing, by presenting the difficulties of mobilizing employee voice in lean problem-solving teams. This work provides new knowledge to managers to address challenges and opportunities to ensure decent work and to improve productivity.Originality/valueThis research raises a key issue of employee voice and its influence on lean performance which addresses two critical areas of employee voice behavior in lean teams: team-members' voice role perception and implicit voice beliefs that influence their voice behavior in the workplace, thereby influencing team performance.


Author(s):  
Ralf Müller ◽  
Nathalie Drouin ◽  
Shankar Sankaran

This book describes balanced leadership in projects. Based on an award winning global program of research studies on leadership reality in projects, this book shows that leadership changes constantly and is not as static as existing literature may suggests. Instead, leadership in projects is dynamically shifted between project managers, individual team members, and subteams, all balanced in situational contingency. Their leadership may be exercised through a vertical, horizontal, shared, or distributed leadership approach. However, it is balanced leadership that ensures the best suitable leadership approach is used in any given situation. For that, the book presents a project-specific leadership approach called horizontal leadership, a theory of balanced leadership, and the five building blocks that enable balanced leadership. These are nomination of team members, identification of potential leaders, selection and empowerment of leaders, empowered leadership and its governance, as well as leadership transition. Emphasis is also given to the coordination of these building blocks through the socio-cognitive space, shared by project manager and team. The book finishes with three real-life case studies that exemplify how balanced leadership unfolds in projects.


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