content strategy
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2022 ◽  
pp. 004728162110725
Author(s):  
Jason Tham ◽  
Tharon Howard ◽  
Gustav Verhulsdonck

This article follows up on the conversation about new streams of approaches in technical communication and user experience (UX) design, i.e., design thinking, content strategy, and artificial intelligence (AI), which afford implications for professional practice. By extending such implications to technical communication pedagogy, we aim to demonstrate the importance of paying attention to these streams in our programmatic development and provide strategies for doing so.


2021 ◽  
Vol 12 ◽  
Author(s):  
Yuying Liu ◽  
Xinxin Liu ◽  
Meng Wang ◽  
Decheng Wen

Enterprises often post branded content on social media and adopt a proactive response approach to improve digital customer engagement to gain a competitive advantage. However, there are many brands which fail to operate social media as effectively as expected. The effective use of brand social media strategies to improve digital customer engagement remains an ongoing challenge for the enterprises. Based on firm-generated content theory and social presence theory, this study aims to identify the impact of brand social media strategies on different levels of digital customer engagement, including positive filtering, cognitive and affective processing as well as advocacy from content strategy and response strategy. Based on 1,519 brand posts on the official Weibo pages of eight of the top 500 Chinese brands in 2021, this study uses a multiple linear regression model to examine the impact of brand social media strategies on digital customer engagement and the moderating effects of brand image and discretionary purchases. The findings show that, on the one hand, among the brand social media content strategies, action content strategy is associated with higher levels of digital customer engagement. On the other hand, different brand social media response strategies have a differential impact on digital customer engagement levels, with cohesive response being the best strategy for increasing digital customer engagement level. In addition, the effectiveness of brand social media response strategy in digital customer engagement is further moderated by the brand image and discretionary purchases. In contrast, the effectiveness of brand social media response strategy in digital customer engagement is stronger when the brand image emphasizes its “competence” or the discretionary purchases focus on “material purchases.” This study not only enriches the research on digital customer engagement but also provides a reference for the brand strategy selection, design and management based on social media.


LOGOS ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 32 (2) ◽  
pp. 7-9
Author(s):  
Helena Gustafsson

Abstract Storytel is one of the world’s largest subscribed audiobook and ebook streaming services and offers unlimited listening and reading of more than 700 000 titles on a global scale. Its vision is to make the world a more empathetic and creative place with great stories to be shared and enjoyed by anyone, anywhere, and at anytime. Storytel operates in 25 markets around the globe and is headquartered in Stockholm. In summer 2021, Storytel launched a customized student discount offering in several of its markets, targeting audiences at universities and colleges. Logos seized the opportunity to talk to Storytel’s Chief Content Strategy Officer Helena Gustafsson – about stories, global expansion, the wave of audiotainment, and the evolution of literature in a digital era in which books are more accessible than ever.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Mikayla Meehan

<p>The global marketplace is centred around products and brands that reflect certain identities. Social media can act as vehicles of meaning transfer for social identification between brands and social media users with a global social identity. Recognizing the importance of the psychological and sociological needs that draw social media users to build relationships with global brands, the purpose of this thesis is to explore the relevance of the global social identification process to global social media branding strategy. More specifically, this research considers the role and influence of social group membership dynamics to explore how brand-generated and user-generated content are part of the global social identification process. In that, this research aims to fill the gap where social identity theory has not been applied as a lens through which to understand and evaluate the social media content strategy of a global brand. This gap is important to fill due to the global social media arena’s social-centric nature and transparency in displaying social group memberships. An interpretive paradigm was used for this research, with a qualitative case study approach that consisted of interviews with global social media users/global brand representatives and a content analysis of the focal brands social media pages. The study found that the global social identification process on social media consists of two stages, global identity priming and global identity expression. Global identity priming occurs when the psychological and sociological function of global brands is transferred to brand-generated content through a semiotic meaning transfer process. Global identity expression can occur after, as a result of global identity priming, social media users with a global identity categorize the global brand into their in-group. Once in-group categorization takes place, creation and/or sharing of user-generated content with the global brand can be considered an act of identity expression and validation by those with a global identity. This has implications for a global brand’s social media content strategy, as the findings revealed that brand-generated content featuring certain symbolic global values facilitates the global social identification process on social media. Moreover, the findings revealed that user-generated content created by social media users for global identity expression purposes is of considerable value to global brands. Understanding how the global social identification process transpires on social media can guide global brands to consider how their content strategy can prime global social identification and meet the identity expression needs of those with a global identity. This has implications for content strategy design, social media interactions and ongoing global brand-user relationships.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Mikayla Meehan

<p>The global marketplace is centred around products and brands that reflect certain identities. Social media can act as vehicles of meaning transfer for social identification between brands and social media users with a global social identity. Recognizing the importance of the psychological and sociological needs that draw social media users to build relationships with global brands, the purpose of this thesis is to explore the relevance of the global social identification process to global social media branding strategy. More specifically, this research considers the role and influence of social group membership dynamics to explore how brand-generated and user-generated content are part of the global social identification process. In that, this research aims to fill the gap where social identity theory has not been applied as a lens through which to understand and evaluate the social media content strategy of a global brand. This gap is important to fill due to the global social media arena’s social-centric nature and transparency in displaying social group memberships. An interpretive paradigm was used for this research, with a qualitative case study approach that consisted of interviews with global social media users/global brand representatives and a content analysis of the focal brands social media pages. The study found that the global social identification process on social media consists of two stages, global identity priming and global identity expression. Global identity priming occurs when the psychological and sociological function of global brands is transferred to brand-generated content through a semiotic meaning transfer process. Global identity expression can occur after, as a result of global identity priming, social media users with a global identity categorize the global brand into their in-group. Once in-group categorization takes place, creation and/or sharing of user-generated content with the global brand can be considered an act of identity expression and validation by those with a global identity. This has implications for a global brand’s social media content strategy, as the findings revealed that brand-generated content featuring certain symbolic global values facilitates the global social identification process on social media. Moreover, the findings revealed that user-generated content created by social media users for global identity expression purposes is of considerable value to global brands. Understanding how the global social identification process transpires on social media can guide global brands to consider how their content strategy can prime global social identification and meet the identity expression needs of those with a global identity. This has implications for content strategy design, social media interactions and ongoing global brand-user relationships.</p>


Author(s):  
Ivani Nafisa Putri

Fashion local brands are brands of fashion clothing local to a particular country, manufactured and produced locally, including the ones in Indonesia. Fashion is always developing and creating the latest trend in which is a big potential for local fashion brands to take this opportunity because consumers are becoming more selective when it comes to selecting superior, long-lasting, and practical products. In Indonesia, the Fashion Industry is one of the subs that contribute to the creative industry, accounted for 28.29% of the whole creative industry, and ranked 9th in the Global Revenue Ranking. In addition, the current pandemic condition has pushed many brands to close retail stores and switched to almost entirely digital operations. Among many social media platforms used by brands, Instagram has been identified as the most efficient tool for reaching out to customers and marketing a business. However, the way local fashion brands use Instagram as a marketing tool has not always been effective. This research aims to assess the effectiveness factors of Instagram in local fashion brands that have a high engagement in purpose to make them as the benchmarks about the content strategy in building high online engagement that makes Instagram as a marketing tool effective. The data was collected through Instagram analytics software, HypeAuditor, and Analisa.io towards a total of 50 Instagram account fashion local brands with a high number of engagements according to HypeAuditor Instagram Engagement Rate Calculator. The data analysis is processed using Microsoft Excel and Smart PLS. The result shows that all independent variables have a positive relationship to online engagement and the effective factors for local fashion brand Instagram accounts are Entertainment, Tag, Weekdays, and Peak hours factors. The brand could utilize posting feeds containing entertainment and information content while also posting it during peak hours and weekdays.


2021 ◽  
pp. 004728162110419
Author(s):  
Gustav Verhulsdonck ◽  
Tharon Howard ◽  
Jason Tham

Technical and professional communication (TPC) and user experience (UX) design are often seen as intertwined due to being user-centered. Yet, as widening industry positions combine TPC and UX, new streams enrich our understanding. This article looks at three such streams, namely, design thinking, content strategy, and artificial intelligence to uncover specific industry practices, skills, and ways to advocate for users. These streams foster a multistage user-centered methodology focused on a continuous designing process, strategic ways for developing content across different platforms and channels, and for developing in smart contexts where agentive products act for users. In this article, we synthesize these developments and draw out how these impact TPC.


2021 ◽  
Vol 16 (3) ◽  
pp. 143-145
Author(s):  
Sarah Bartlett Schroeder

A Review of: Logan, J., & Spence, M. (2021). Content strategy in LibGuides: An exploratory study. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 47(1), Article 102282. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2020.102282 Abstract Objective – To determine what strategies academic libraries use to govern creation and maintenance of their LibGuides. Design – Online survey questionnaire. Setting – A selection of academic libraries that use Springshare’s LibGuide system, mainly in the United States and Canada. Subjects – Academic libraries with administrator level access to LibGuides at 120 large and small, private and public schools.  Methods – Researchers made their online questionnaire available on a Springshare lounge and recruited participants through electronic mailing lists. Respondents were self-selected participants. The survey consisted of 35 questions, including several about their institution’s size and type, the number of LibGuides available through their library, and how their guides are created and reviewed. There was space available for comments. The survey stated that the researchers’ goal is to complete an “environmental scan of content strategies” in LibGuides at academic institutions.  Main Results – Of the 120 responding institutions, 88% are located in either the United States or Canada and 53% reported that they do have content guidelines for LibGuide authors. Content guidelines might include parameters for topics, target audiences, or purpose. Parameters for structural elements, including page design, content reuse policies, naming conventions, and navigation, were most commonly represented at those institutions that reported having guidelines. Seventy-seven percent of respondents reported that their LibGuides do not go through a formal review process prior to publication. Regarding LibGuide maintenance, 58% reported that LibGuides are reviewed as needed, while 27% indicated a more systematic approach. In most cases, the LibGuide reviewer is the author, though sometimes a LibGuide administrator may take on a review role. The most common considerations for LibGuide review are currency, accuracy, usage, and consistency. Of the responding institutions, 74% reported that they do not conduct any user testing of their guides. Two of the biggest barriers to introducing and maintaining LibGuide guidelines identified in the survey were lack of time and a sense of librarian ownership over content and workflow. The strong culture of academic freedom may make some librarians resistant to following institutional guidelines. Survey respondents noted that, where content guidelines are present, they tend to address “low hanging fruit” issues, such as page design and naming conventions, rather than more complex issues around tone and messaging. Conclusion – Content creators tend to have many competing priorities, so a workflow and guideline system might help librarians spend less time on their guides. Despite a large amount of research on LibGuide best practices regarding content strategy, few institutions seem to be taking systematic steps to implement them. Further research examining the experiences of LibGuide authors and administrators and on the effectiveness of content strategy practices is necessary.


2021 ◽  
Vol 62 ◽  
pp. 102648
Author(s):  
Balamurugan Annamalai ◽  
Masayuki Yoshida ◽  
Sanjeev Varshney ◽  
Atul Arun Pathak ◽  
Pingali Venugopal

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