plan implementation
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Author(s):  
Shahid Ali

Abstract: Package CS3 of Metro Line 1 in Surat City includes 3 stations i.e. Surat railway station, Maskati Hospital and Chowk Bazar. As per proposed Metro plan of Surat city, this line will originate from Sarthana station and will terminate at Dream City. The length of Line 1 is 21.61KM of which 14.59km is elevated whereas 7.02km is Underground and consists of 20 Stations. This metro line envisages use of public transport system in Surat city and shall cater the present and future travel demand of the catchment area and shall also reduce load from road based transport system of the corridor. During the construction phase of any Mass Rapid Transit System (MRTS) running along the Right of Way (ROW) of existing roadway system, Traffic diversion and management plan implementation becomes absolute mandatory to reduce congestion, conflicts increase level of safety and ease construction process. Similarly, for package CS3 of Surat Metro line 1, there is need of preparing an implementing Traffic Diversion and Management plan to create a synergy amongst construction activities, traffic flow, safety of pedestrian and construction worker with minimal impact on surrounding catchment. This study shall provide Traffic diversion and management plan which may help to cater the existing traffic and stir them in a smooth and non-congested flow with the help of signage’s, road markings, etc.


Author(s):  
Rahasti Isnaini ◽  
Gunawan Gunawan ◽  
Muhammad Taufik

  This study aimed to develop learning tools on business and energy materials based on project based learning models that are suitable for use in learning. This research was a development research by 4Ddevelopment model design consisting of 4 stages, namely: define; design, develop, and disseminate. This research was only up to the stage of development. Based on the results of validation by experts, the development of learning tools in this study was valid. The percentage of validity was 87.5% on the syllabus; 87.5% on the lesson plan implementation; and 82.5% on student worksheets. Based on the results, the development of learning tools in this study is feasible to use with revisions to the student worksheet because it has quite valid criteria.


AL-TA LIM ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 28 (3) ◽  
pp. 213-222
Author(s):  
Abdul Gafur Marzuki ◽  
Ana Kuliahana

This research aims at enhancing EFL students’ speaking skill through the use of language games. The research was designed in the form of Classroom Action Research. It was conducted in two cycles and six meetings. Each cycle consisted of plan, implementation, observation, and Reflection. The researchers employed an observation checklist, field notes, questionnaire, and test to collect the data. The main criterion of success of this research was that the students’ scores on the speaking test should achieve a score of 70, and it must be achieved by 75% of the total number of students. The second criterion was that the lecturer’s classroom performance should meet the “Success” category. The results of the first speaking test showed that from 24 students in the classroom, 15 students got scores of 70 or higher. It was equal to 62.5 %. In cycle 2, the total number of students who got scores of 70 or higher was 21. It was equal to 87.5 %. The result of this research indicated that the use of language games can develop the students’ speaking skills


2021 ◽  
Vol 18 ◽  
pp. 1545-1553
Author(s):  
Rungroj Subanjui ◽  
Thanatchaporn Thawilpol

This research aimed to analyze the confirmatory factors and validate the compliance between the confirmatory factor structure of industrial inventory management optimization and empirical data. The sample were 500 industrial executives in Thailand. The research tool was a questionnaire, with a reliability value of 0.95. The data was analyzed with confirmatory factor analysis and second order confirmatory factor analysis. The results found that the factors of inventory management optimization comprised four factors based on the Deming Cycle, including Planning (Plan), Implementation (Do), Assessment (Check), and Improvement (Act). The findings of first order confirmatory factor analysis showed that all index values were over the criteria with a composition weight of 0.72-0.87 at a statistical significance level of 0.01. The second order confirmatory factor analysis showed that all index values were over the criteria with a composition weight of 0.86-0.91 at a statistical significance level of 0.01. The model was congruent with the empirical data. The results of model validation indicated the p = 0.46, CMIN/DF = 0.99, GFI = 0.99 and RMSEA = 0.00. The results of this research could be applied for further improvement of the efficiency of the organization's inventory management.


2021 ◽  
Vol 11 (4) ◽  
pp. 539-549
Author(s):  
Annisa Faizah ◽  
Djoko Sutopo

This study aims to explain the teacher’s pedagogical competence and  professional competence on EFL, authentic assessment on EFL, describe the application of authentic assessment, and investigate the effect of teachers' pedagogical and professional competencies on authentic assessment practice. This qualitative study investigated the effects of pedagogical and professional competencies on authentic assessment practice. The subjects of the study consisted of the English teachers of Public Senior High School 1 Jepara. The data were collected with the observation checklist, questionnaire, and interview. The data were analyzed with Miles and Huberman's model. The teacher manifested her pedagogical competence into the plan implementation, evaluation, and reflection. The way she applied authentic assessment was only with the project. She was aware of the function of authentic assessment. It was proven that she did not level up the learning activities when the learners had not passed a specific criterion she determined. However, since she did not provide corrective feedbacks, the learners felt that the teacher only assessed the final project product. Moreover, the teacher did not provide a proper evaluation. She only provided the correct examples, so it made the learners could not arrange their plans. This situation could be improved if the teacher continuously developed her academic qualification and competence based on science, technology, and artistic advancement. Teachers should have this features to be more professional.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Joseph Sturm

<p>The Wellington City District Plan, operative since the year 2000, set goals for housing intensification. Residential development is encouraged within the existing footprint of the urban area of Wellington City. Intensification means housing development must incorporate a greater mix of housing typologies denser than the currently predominant low density single detached dwellings. To deliver intensification, planning in Wellington aims to incorporate medium density housing typologies that result in more dwellings while using less land.  In 2007 Plan Change 56: Managing the Quality of Infill Housing was introduced. The plan change responded to concerns about the quality of housing outcomes being delivered by intensification. The implementation framework was amended through changing and adding a number of policies and rules and the Multiunit Developments Design Guide was replaced with the Residential Design Guide. The Plan Change kept policies for intensification, while policies controlling quality of medium density housing were amended.  This research measured the effect of Plan Change 56 on the quality of medium density housing outcomes. Success in planning was found to be defined by the way plan implementation contributes to built outcomes meeting a plan’s goals and objectives. To measure outcomes, a method of assessing case studies was applied based on a range of prior New Zealand research.  The Ministry for the Environment’s Medium-density Housing Case Study Assessment Methodology was used to assess and compare Wellington case studies of medium density housing from the periods before and after Plan Change 56. The selected case studies give evidence that Plan Change 56 did not cause an improvement in the quality of medium density housing outcomes.  The key finding is that the treatment of open space is significant in defining the quality of medium density housing outcomes. Plan Change 56 made a number of amendments to the District Plan in terms of the way open space is treated around dwellings. Despite this, it was the most significant reason for post-Plan change case studies achieving low quality outcomes. Detailed comparison showed that changes to the District Plan rules for open space did not cause the quality of outcomes to improve.  The application of the Residential Design Guide was compared to the superseded Multi Unit Developments Design Guide. The most significant amendments by Plan Change 56 related to guidelines for the design of building along street frontages in terms of volumes, orientation, and façade treatments. The case study results showed there was little difference in the way each design guide was used to assess Resource Consent applications.  The results conclusively show that Plan Change 56 did not cause an improvement in the quality of medium density housing outcomes in Wellington.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Joseph Sturm

<p>The Wellington City District Plan, operative since the year 2000, set goals for housing intensification. Residential development is encouraged within the existing footprint of the urban area of Wellington City. Intensification means housing development must incorporate a greater mix of housing typologies denser than the currently predominant low density single detached dwellings. To deliver intensification, planning in Wellington aims to incorporate medium density housing typologies that result in more dwellings while using less land.  In 2007 Plan Change 56: Managing the Quality of Infill Housing was introduced. The plan change responded to concerns about the quality of housing outcomes being delivered by intensification. The implementation framework was amended through changing and adding a number of policies and rules and the Multiunit Developments Design Guide was replaced with the Residential Design Guide. The Plan Change kept policies for intensification, while policies controlling quality of medium density housing were amended.  This research measured the effect of Plan Change 56 on the quality of medium density housing outcomes. Success in planning was found to be defined by the way plan implementation contributes to built outcomes meeting a plan’s goals and objectives. To measure outcomes, a method of assessing case studies was applied based on a range of prior New Zealand research.  The Ministry for the Environment’s Medium-density Housing Case Study Assessment Methodology was used to assess and compare Wellington case studies of medium density housing from the periods before and after Plan Change 56. The selected case studies give evidence that Plan Change 56 did not cause an improvement in the quality of medium density housing outcomes.  The key finding is that the treatment of open space is significant in defining the quality of medium density housing outcomes. Plan Change 56 made a number of amendments to the District Plan in terms of the way open space is treated around dwellings. Despite this, it was the most significant reason for post-Plan change case studies achieving low quality outcomes. Detailed comparison showed that changes to the District Plan rules for open space did not cause the quality of outcomes to improve.  The application of the Residential Design Guide was compared to the superseded Multi Unit Developments Design Guide. The most significant amendments by Plan Change 56 related to guidelines for the design of building along street frontages in terms of volumes, orientation, and façade treatments. The case study results showed there was little difference in the way each design guide was used to assess Resource Consent applications.  The results conclusively show that Plan Change 56 did not cause an improvement in the quality of medium density housing outcomes in Wellington.</p>


2021 ◽  
pp. 315-326
Author(s):  
Robert E. Stevens ◽  
David L. Loudon ◽  
Bruce Wrenn ◽  
William E. Warren

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