Tool Selection
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Author(s):  
Megan B. Sands ◽  
Ian Wee ◽  
Meera Agar ◽  
Janette L. Vardy

Abstract Purpose Delirium leads to poor outcomes for patients and careers and has negative impacts on staff and service provision. Cancer rates in elderly populations are increasing and frequently, cancer diagnoses are a co-morbidity in the context of frailty. Data relating to the epidemiology of delirium in hospitalised cancer patients are limited. With the overarching purpose of improving delirium detection and reducing the morbidity and mortality of delirium in cancer patients, we reviewed the epidemiological data and approach to delirium detection in hospitalised, adult oncology patients. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and SCOPUS databases were searched from January 1996 to August 2017. Key concepts were delirium, cancer, inpatient oncology and delirium screening/detection. Results Of 896 unique studies identified; 91 met full-text review criteria. Of 12 eligible studies, four applied recommended case ascertainment methods to all patients, three used delirium screening tools alone or with case ascertainment tools sub-optimally applied, four used tools not recommended for delirium screening or case ascertainment, one used the Confusion Assessment Method with insufficient information to determine if it met case ascertainment status. Two studies presented delirium incidence rates: 7.8%, and 17% respectively. Prevalence rates ranged from 18–33% for general medical or oncology wards; 42–58% for Acute Palliative Care Units (APCU); and for older cancer patients: 22% and 57%. Three studies reported reversibility; 26% and 49% respectively (APCUs) and 30% (older patients with cancer). Six studies had a low risk of bias according to QUADAS-2 criteria; all studies in the APCU setting were rated at higher risk of bias. Tool selection, study flow and recruitment bias reduced study quality. Conclusion The knowledge base for improved interventions and clinical care for adults with cancer and delirium is limited by the low number of studies. A clear distinction between screening tools and diagnostic tools is required to provide an improved understanding of the rates of delirium and its reversibility in this population.


Author(s):  
Yunliang Huo ◽  
Ji Xiong ◽  
Yu Ze ◽  
Sitao Chen ◽  
Zhixing Guo

Tool selection is a multi-criteria decision-making problem in the presence of various selection criteria and a set of alternatives, but previous works are limited to evaluating the tools within the workshop tool library. To intelligently select proper inserts across suppliers under the Internet environment, an insert data format based on ISO 513 was established, and a framework was then designed to obtain a set of alternatives from different suppliers based on fuzzy intervals. Then, knowledge was described with convenient language and the simple membership function to build an intelligent system, which would infer the matching degree of insert characteristics to the machining conditions. Furthermore, analytic hierarchy process was applied to sort the alternatives. Finally, the case study shows that compared with previous works and machinists, this work not only obtains a set of alternatives from all suppliers who uploaded their product data with the designed format but comprehensively evaluates the insert (take finishing low-carbon steel as an example, both cemented carbide and cermet are recommended, the nose radius reduces 25%, the environmental index increases 25%, while the rake reduces 11.25%, when compared with machinists who tend to select the larger rake angle foe finishing). A platform was also developed based on Visual Studio 2015 and SQL Server 2012 to improve selection efficiency for inexperienced CNC operators, purchasers, and vendors.


Author(s):  
Thomas M. Schnieders ◽  
Colten W. Fales ◽  
Ahmad Abdelhafiz Mumani ◽  
Erik Danford Klein ◽  
Joseph Yun Ming Kim ◽  
...  

VUZF Review ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 6 (4) ◽  
pp. 195-208
Author(s):  
Maciej Ślusarczyk ◽  
Izabella Kęsy ◽  
Patrycja Ślusarczyk

The main objective of the article was to show the relationship between the selection of appropriate economic indicators, correlating them with the appropriate project methods used in process management, and on the basis of this to show ways to improve management processes in this method. Presentation of economic resources, indicator dependencies and management tools in the project method was necessary to achieve the goal. The paper presents the authors' views on the essence of tool selection in the design method taking into account resources and economic aspects. The VUCA environment is also considered and characterized and described. The use of two methods adapted to project management has been proposed. The selection of these methods used in project management based on the analysis of economic resources, vibrating environment and the speed of response and planning in the company was justified. In the following article, the authors also proposed a selection of economic indicators on the basis of which it is possible to determine the degree of advancement of the project, its profitability and to indicate the critical points and places where delays may occur or the original plan may be exceeded. The indicators were selected in such a way as to be a representative group of comparisons in the field of economics, in the macro and micro environment, in the social field, in the resource field of the company and to show the economic aspect of these activities. By matching appropriate methods of project management with appropriate economic indicators, a model of economic-management relations was obtained, which used in management streamlines decision-making processes in the company and improves its effectiveness, profitability and resource efficiency.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Qiyang Zhang ◽  
Amanda Jean Neitzel

In recent years, the increasing influence of evidence-based research and the rapid development of artificial intelligence have enabled the launch of many new reference screening software tools. Due to a dearth of research comparing different screening tools in educational research, researchers often choose the most convenient rather than the most suitable screening tool. This review aims to provide assistance for screening tool selection through a systematic narrative review and feature analysis of these tools’ functions and privacy policies. The current adoption rate of transparent tool reporting is low: by screening 191 studies published in the Review of Educational Research since 2015, we found that only eight (4.19%) studies reported screening tools. To locate available screening tools in the market, we consulted various sources and found 24 tools. Through citation search, we identified eight screening tools used by educational reviewers and ranked them in descending order of feature score: EPPI-Reviewer (tie), DistillerSR (tie), Covidence, Rayyan, Abstrackr, ASReview, RevMan, and Excel. For practitioners’ convenience, we concluded the paper with a decision tree to assist educational systematic reviewers in identifying suitable tools. This paper represents the first effort to provide educational researchers with guidance on how to navigate screening tools. Our results encourage researchers to report their tool usage in publications and select tools based on suitability instead of convenience.


2021 ◽  
Vol 5 (Supplement_1) ◽  
pp. 790-790
Author(s):  
Chad Tiernan ◽  
Allon Goldberg

Abstract Balance confidence assessment in older adults has implications for falls and quality of life. It remains unclear whether the original Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC-16) scale or the shortened 6-item (ABC-6) scale is recommended. To further inform the decision-making process of balance confidence tool selection, a secondary analysis of an existing dataset consisting of 77 community-dwelling older adults was performed. ABC-16 and ABC-6 association and agreement, internal consistencies, and relationships with self-rated health (SRH) were assessed. Participants were primarily female (80.5%) between the ages of 60 and 87 years. Results indicated a strong association between the scales [r = .97, p<.001); ICC(2,1) = .80] but limited agreement (95% Limits of Agreement range = 22.1; mean difference of 7.2 points in the direction of the ABC-16). Cronbach’s alphas were .95 (ABC-16) and .89 (ABC-6), suggesting high internal consistency for both scales but possible item redundancy with the ABC-16. Regression model 1 (ABC-6 = primary predictor) explained more of the variance (R2=.36) in SRH compared to model 2 (ABC-16 = primary predictor; R2=.29). Hotelling’s t-test [t(74)=2.4, p=.008] indicated that the correlation coefficient (Multiple R) from the ABC-6 model was significantly higher than the correlation coefficient from the ABC-16 model. In conclusion, despite a high correlation, the two scales did not agree strongly and should not be considered interchangeable. Given that the ABC-16 takes longer to administer, does not relate to SRH as strongly, and could have redundant items, the ABC-6 should be considered for balance confidence assessment in older adults.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Dayu Guan

<p>Purpose - The purpose of this case study is to understand how two organizations view and utilise automated testing and how it relates to the literature. It outlines and discusses the key factors to be taken into consideration when setting up an automated testing, in addition to the risks involved.  Design/methodology/approach – Focus group discussions were executed to collect the data and the findings were compared with other literatures.  Findings – For cognition of automated testing, it is not only limited to its definition and benefits that may be brought into the organization, but also need to focus more on scope of application and preconditions. Aside from the key considerations such as people resistance, working process and training, some other concerns were also found from managerial perspective when adopting automated testing: (1) Cost-benefit – Return of Investment (ROI) is an effective method to analyse the investment, especially for the factors affecting the cost of investment; (2) Management support. It includes balancing between business and technology, management involvement and coordinating the relations between the departments; (3) Tool selection: Choosing the right automation tool is a very complicated process with a lot internal factors involved.  Practical implication – For an organization that doesn’t have automated testing implemented yet, a pilot project can be the first option to understand its practicality and applicability based on individual organizational context.  Originality/Value – This case study can be used for an organization that interests in better introducing and implementing automated testing within the organization.  Key Words – Automated testing, Cost-benefit, Management support, Tool selection, practicality, applicability and ROI.  Paper Type – Case Study Research.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Dayu Guan

<p>Purpose - The purpose of this case study is to understand how two organizations view and utilise automated testing and how it relates to the literature. It outlines and discusses the key factors to be taken into consideration when setting up an automated testing, in addition to the risks involved.  Design/methodology/approach – Focus group discussions were executed to collect the data and the findings were compared with other literatures.  Findings – For cognition of automated testing, it is not only limited to its definition and benefits that may be brought into the organization, but also need to focus more on scope of application and preconditions. Aside from the key considerations such as people resistance, working process and training, some other concerns were also found from managerial perspective when adopting automated testing: (1) Cost-benefit – Return of Investment (ROI) is an effective method to analyse the investment, especially for the factors affecting the cost of investment; (2) Management support. It includes balancing between business and technology, management involvement and coordinating the relations between the departments; (3) Tool selection: Choosing the right automation tool is a very complicated process with a lot internal factors involved.  Practical implication – For an organization that doesn’t have automated testing implemented yet, a pilot project can be the first option to understand its practicality and applicability based on individual organizational context.  Originality/Value – This case study can be used for an organization that interests in better introducing and implementing automated testing within the organization.  Key Words – Automated testing, Cost-benefit, Management support, Tool selection, practicality, applicability and ROI.  Paper Type – Case Study Research.</p>


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