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2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Laura Ramsay ◽  
Cheyenne M. May ◽  
Priscilla Kennedy ◽  
Erin Lucy Fitzakerley

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to outline qualitative research into what influences, maintains and reduces prolific self-harm within women’s prisons across England. Design/methodology/approach Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants who were identified as engaging in prolific self-harm. Thematic analysis was applied to two data sets, and analyses were combined to generate final themes. Findings Six overarching themes were identified which served to explain what influences the repetitive nature of prolific self-harm and also what helps to reduce it. The themes were reasons for self-harm, trauma, being in prison, support, other support and interventions: management and rehabilitative. Research limitations/implications Owing to the sensitive nature of the research a stringent exclusion criteria was applied which limited the data sample from the original pool. Variance in detail was observed from the interviewer transcripts. The data sample was not large enough to examine the influence of protected characteristics. Practical implications Responsivity in the support offered by staff is critical to a reduction in repetitive harm. A re-focus on staff training, plus support mechanisms for staff supporting people in women’s prisons who self-harm prolifically has been recommended. Originality/value This paper has focussed specifically on prolific self-harm within women’s prisons. This has not been an area that has been investigated separately to the general self-harm literature in prisons. This paper provides insight into factors which influence, maintain and reduce prolific-self harm in women residing in prison.


2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Blaine Stothard

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the history of relevant legislation before and after the 1971 Misuse of Drugs Act (MDA). Design/methodology/approach A chronological narrative of laws and reports with concluding discussion. Findings That UK legislators have not made use of the evidence base available to them and have favoured enforcement rather than treatment approaches. That current UK practice has exacerbated not contain the use of and harms caused by illegal drugs. Research limitations/implications The paper does not cover all relevant documents, especially those from non-governmental sources. Practical implications The practical implications centre on the failure of consecutive governments to reflect on and review the impact of current legislation, especially on people who use drugs. Social implications That the situations of people who use drugs are currently ignored by the government and those proven responses which save lives and reduce harm are rejected. Originality/value The paper attempts to show the historical contexts of control and dangerousness of which the MDA is one instrument.


2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Brian Leavy

Purpose The Fail-Safe Startup: Your Roadmap for Entrepreneurial Success, the new book by entrepreneurship researcher Tom Eisenmann, sets out to help improve the odds by looking more closely at the most prevalent causes of startup failure and how to avoid them. Design/methodology/approach Eisenmann research led him to identify six distinct patterns that explain a large proportion of startup failures, three relating to early stage failures and three to late stage. Findings Strong demand from early adopters may lead a founder to scale up prematurely. Practical/implications Entrepreneurs must research differences in the needs of likely early adopters and mainstream customers during the upfront customer discovery phase. Originality/value Entrepreneurs must research differences in the needs of likely early adopters and mainstream customers during the upfront customer discovery phase. 10; 10;The line between visionary entrepreneur and cult leader can become blurry, and a founder?s ?reality distortion field--useful for motivating others to help pursue the founder?s dream?can become a liability.


2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Rachel M. Lofthouse ◽  
Anthea Rose ◽  
Ruth Whiteside

PurposeThe research demonstrates the role of activity systems based in Cultural Historical Activity Theory as a means of analysing characteristics and efficacy of specific provisions of coaching in education.Design/methodology/approachThree examples of coaching in education were selected, involving 51 schools in England. The three examples were re-analysed using activity systems. This drew on existing evaluation evidence, gathered through interviews, questionnaires, focus groups and recordings of coaching.FindingsIn each example, the object of the coaching was to address a specific challenge to secure the desired quality of education. Using activity systems it is possible to demonstrate that coaching has a range of functions (both intended and consequential). The individual examples illustrate the potential of coaching to support change in complex and diverse education settings.Research limitations/implicationsThe use of existing data from evaluations means that direct comparisons between examples are not made. While data were collected throughout the duration of each coaching programme no follow-up data was available.Practical implicationsThe analysis of the examples of coaching using activity systems provides evidence of the efficacy of specific coaching provision in achieving individually defined objectives related to sustaining and improving specific educational practices.Originality/valueThe research offers insights into how coaching in education might be better tuned to the specific needs of contexts and the challenges experienced by the individuals working in them. In addition, it demonstrates the value of activity systems as an analytical tool to make sense of coaching efficacy.


2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Neuza Ribeiro ◽  
Ana Suzete Semedo ◽  
Daniel Gomes ◽  
Rita Bernardino ◽  
Sharda Singh

Purpose This study aims to examine the impact of workplace bullying on employees’ burnout by investigating the mediating effect of affective well-being (AWB). Design/methodology/approach Data of 532 employees from diverse organizations in Portugal were collected. These data were collected using anonymously completed structured questionnaires available online. Findings The results support the research hypotheses proposed, confirming that workplace bullying is related to both AWB and burnout. Moreover, affective workplace bullying partially mediates the relationship between workplace bullying and burnout, indicating that the victims have their AWB reduced, and, consequently, increase their burnout levels. Practical implications The findings suggest that organizations can foster employees’ AWB and reduce the level of burnout by encouraging organizations to develop preventive policies and practices to safeguard against bullying at work. Originality/value To this date, only a few studies have examined mediating and moderating variables (Nielsen and Einersen, 2018) and none include AWB as a mediator of the relationship between workplace bullying and burnout. This study answers the call for further empirical research from those who have argued that more information is needed to understand the workplace bullying phenomenon and contributes to the growing debate on this topic and its effects on employees.


2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  

Purpose This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. Design/methodology/approach This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. Findings SMEs within emerging markets are increasingly engaging in export activities. Identification of factors with potential to aid or impede efforts can help such firms to take appropriate actions to develop strategies which can enhance their export performance. Originality/value The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.


2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  

Purpose This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies. Design/methodology/approach This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. Findings Increase in populism is fueling anti-globalization sentiments and negatively impacting on the investment, expansion and location plans of many multinational enterprises. By focusing on social legitimacy, resilience and institutional arbitrage, such organizations can develop appropriate nonmarket strategies to help alleviate risk and better adapt to the changing business environment. Originality/value The briefing saves busy executives and researchers’ hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Zachary Neal ◽  
Jennifer Watling Neal

Both urban planners and urban scholars have been keenly interested in identifying the characteristics associated with neighborhood satisfaction. One robust but surprising pattern is that the presence or number of children in a household has no effect on neighborhood satisfaction. To clarify this pattern, we measured the neighborhood satisfaction of a representative sample of 1000 Michigan adults, whom we divided into six distinct reproductive statuses: co-parents, single-parents, empty nesters, not-yet-parents, childless individuals, and childfree individuals. We found that a simple parent vs. non-parent dichotomy hides significant heterogeneity among these groups. Co-parents and not-yet-parents both experience distinctively high levels of neighborhood satisfaction, while single parents and childfree individuals experience significantly less neighborhood satisfaction. We also find that population density and COVID-related stress reduce the neighborhood satisfaction of each group in similar ways. We conclude by reflecting on the methodological and practical implications of differences in neighborhood satisfaction when more nuanced reproductive statuses are considered.


2021 ◽  
pp. 026540752110444
Author(s):  
Deborah B. Yoon ◽  
Jennifer A. Theiss

Infertility can change the way people see themselves and their relational roles. This study examined how changes to identity following reproductive hardship are associated with identity uncertainty and relationship outcomes. Drawing on relational turbulence theory, we position identity uncertainty as an antecedent condition for relational uncertainty and interdependence processes in the context of infertility and examine these relationship mechanisms as predictors of relational turbulence and perceptions of partner communication during this relationship transition. We surveyed 152 women who have been unsuccessful at conceiving for at least 12 months about their identity and perceptions of their relationship. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Consistent with hypotheses, identity change was positively associated with identity uncertainty, which, in turn, predicted increased relational uncertainty. Relational turbulence was positively predicted by relational uncertainty, but not partner interference or facilitation. Perceptions of a partner’s communication were predicted by relational turbulence and partner facilitation. The theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.


2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Jae-Seob Lee

PurposeThe purpose of the paper is to develop a method to integrate the schedule-based analysis with a productivity-based analysis to prove and support the result of the damages calculation.Design/methodology/approachIn this paper, a “cost and schedule impact integration” (CSI2) model is proposed to objectively show and estimate lost productivity due to changes in construction projects.FindingsA schedule-based analysis to include separate tracking of change order costs can be used to predict productivity due to the delay and disruption; changes in construction projects almost always result in delay and disruption. However, the schedule-based analysis needs to be integrated with a productivity-based analysis to prove and support the result of the damages calculation.Practical implicationsThe results of this study expand upon construction practices for proving and quantifying lost productivity due to changes in construction projects.Originality/valueThe contribution of the paper is summarized as the introduction of a “schedule impact analysis” into a “cost impact analysis” technique to assess the damages, as well as to demonstrate the labor productivity impact due to delay and disruption in construction projects.


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