Online Teaching
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2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Hongmei ZHANG ◽  
Ying ZHU ◽  
Lin LIU ◽  
Weiping LIN ◽  
Tianpu GU ◽  
...  

Abstract Background: To determine the effect of the three teaching methods on the learning of contact lenses and provide recommendations to improve Contact Lenses teaching in optometric education.Methods: The survey was conducted at Tianjin Medical University with the students' evaluations of educational quality (SEEQ) questionnaire with a five-point Likert scale over 2 weeks in June 2021. It is for optometry students whose contact lenses were taught by any of three methods: 92 students enrolled in 2017 at Dagang campus performed online learning, 60 students enrolled in 2017 at Qixiangtai campus performed offline learning, and 100 students enrolled in 2018 at Dagang campus performed blended learning: both online and offline; A total of 252 students were invited to participate in this study. Descriptive statistics were performed to analyze SEEQ items. ANOVA was used to determine significant differences among different teaching methods.Results: 221 valid questionnaires were collected, with a response rate of 87.70% (221/252). Among them, 87(39.37%) were male, and 134(60.63%) were female. Offline teaching students had longer contact time with the faculty than online teaching and blended teaching (p<0.05). No statistically significant differences in sex or academic performance were found among 3 different teaching methods (p=0.33, p=0.91, respectively). There were 18.10% (40/221) of students who suggested increasing experiment and practice time.Conclusion: The traditional offline teaching method had a stable teaching effect. Students had more contact time with faculty than students taught by online and blended teaching. Online teaching and blended teaching worked as well as offline learning. The effectiveness was not be influenced by gender and academic performance.


2021 ◽  
Vol 23 (8) ◽  
pp. 61-83
Author(s):  
I. P. Visković

Introduction. Managing the formal education system during COVID-19 has become an unwanted challenge for the academic community. Without suffi time for preparations, different models of distance education were applied. The aim was to ensure the continuity of teaching, to encourage the process of distance learning, and to enable their evaluation.Aim. This study aimed to analyse the opinions of students from the Department of Early Childhood Education (hereafter ECE) at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (hereafter Faculty), University of Split, on their study conditions during the COVID-19 from March 2020. It was assumed that learning in an online environment encourages the development of new learning strategies. Family and work status and residence of students (in the place of study or outside it) were taken as predictor variables in assessing the quality and conditions of the study.Methodology and research methods. The research was conducted online at the end of the 2020 academic year when students gathered online teaching experiences. The Google Apps tool was used in the data collection process. The Ethics Committee of the Faculty at the University of Split gave its consent to the implementation of this research. During online teaching, all students are informed about the purpose and course of research. Research included 68,75 % students (n = 156) studying at the ECE Department. The following aspects were investigated: forms and frequencies of distance learning; the possibility of students’ response to study obligations (due to closed libraries); difficulties, advantages and possibilities of conducting online teaching; students’ dissatisfaction with the quality of the organisation and implementation of online teaching, and opportunities for quality development.Results. Findings identified difficulties in the lack of ICT competencies of both students and teachers, mixed-use of different platforms, workload and lack of adequate literature. Students assessed the greater availability of teaching materials and more reachable teachers as positive, and experience of discussions on social networks as one of the useful ways of distance learning. By exchanging the content of teaching materials, they developed new learning strategies and showed possible new adaptations to learning using social networking. Students’ dissatisfaction with online teaching could be interpreted by their subjective reasons and contextual conditions.Scientific novelty. The data processed in this research are triangulated with worldwide research on study conditions during lockdowns. It can be concluded that regardless of the previous lockdowns basic use of ICT (sending and receiving seminar tasks over e-mail), most higher education institutions were not ready for an overall transition to online teaching. The findings point to the need for systematic research into the possibilities of applying new technologies in the study process (learning, availability of relevant sources, networking of scientists, and quality exchange of information).Practical significance. Given that before the COVID-19 at this Faculty there was no similar research, nor experience with any online teaching forms, it is difficult to determine the extent of the change. Nevertheless, it is possible to conclude that the teaching staff did not have adequate ICT competencies for the implementation of quality online teaching. The quality of teaching in this research was contributed by more reachable teaching staff and their willingness to cooperate. In the changed living conditions as a consequence of the pandemic, it is possible to expect further changes in the way of studying. The insight and analysis of students’ opinions through this research could contribute to the development of the quality of the teaching process in any given crisis.


2021 ◽  
Vol 2021 ◽  
pp. 1-8
Author(s):  
Min Qi ◽  
Hongying Meng

The COVID-19 epidemic in 2020 posed a sudden and serious challenge to education where online teachings were adopted, and problems that people had not noticed before were exposed. Based on the experience of international online course and the study of online teaching, the paper focuses on the associated problems and puts forward some solutions. First, based on the performance of current software and hardware used in online teaching, the characteristics of commonly used teaching software have been analysed and compared. Then, efficient combinations of teaching software for complementary advantages are recommended to ensure a high-quality online teaching. Second, problems inside of class existing in online lecturing and learning are studied, and corresponding teaching methods have been explored including the aspects of class interaction design and implementation, alternative method for delivering essential video information, and online class management. Finally, some objective class evaluation criteria are studied in terms of coverage of class content, learning effect of specialized knowledge, and online class interaction. In the end, some feasible solutions are provided, and it can be served as a reference to improve the online teaching.


2021 ◽  
Vol 2021 ◽  
pp. 1-9
Author(s):  
Yang Ying ◽  
Wang Hongyan

Traditional online art teaching system has problems such as poor score improvement and low system throughput. Therefore, this paper designs an interactive online art teaching system based on BS mode and IoT. Design the overall structure of the art teaching system according to THE B/S structure, build the interactive art online teaching model according to the system role use cases, introduce the RFID technology in the Internet of Things to control the information transmission of the interactive art online teaching system, and complete the code development of interactive art online teaching function. Complete the interactive art online teaching system based on BS mode and the Internet of Things. The experimental results show that the designed system can improve the scores of students in art colleges and improve the throughput of the system.


2021 ◽  
Vol 6 (2) ◽  
pp. 5098
Author(s):  
Leslie Lee

The sudden shift to online teaching and learning brought about by the Covid-19 pandemic provided an opportunity to consider alternatives to entrenched teaching practices. Making use of the private channel function in Microsoft Teams, I replaced traditional sections in an introductory linguistics course with asynchronous groupwork. This enabled students to form learning communities that facilitated peer learning and support in spite of remote learning, while unexpectedly connecting students with instructors in more personalized ways than typically witnessed in traditional sections. The medium allowed the teaching team to provide tailored feedback on each group’s work, as well as point out errors that were common across groups. I reflect on some of the problems encountered and consider how these might be addressed in the future.


2021 ◽  
pp. bmjebm-2021-111776
Author(s):  
Bharathy Kumaravel ◽  
C Stewart ◽  
Dragan Ilic

ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of two models (face-to-face vs online teaching) of clinically integrating evidence-based medicine (EBM) teaching in an undergraduate medical school.Design and settingA pilot study of face-to-face versus online EBM teaching.ParticipantsThis study focused on undergraduate medical students who entered the University of Buckingham Medical School MBChB course in 2016 (n=65). Of the 65 students, 45 received face-to-face teaching, while 20 received online teaching.Main outcome measuresFeasibility was assessed by the ability to deliver the content, students’ engagement during teaching and their completion rates in formative assessments—Assessing Competency in EBM (ACE) tool, and educational prescriptions (EPs). Effectiveness of teaching for the two models was compared by evaluating students’ performance in the formative assessments and in the summative final professional examination and final year EBM objective structured clinical examination (OSCE).ResultsWe had similar students’ engagement and completion rates in formative assessments in both models. Students receiving face-to-face teaching performed better in EPs (mean difference=−2.28, 95% CI: −4.31 to –0.26). There was no significant difference in performances in the ACE tool (mean difference=−1.02, 95% CI: −2.20 to 0.16); the written final professional exams (mean difference=−0.11, 95% CI: −0.65 to 0.44) and the EBM OSCE station (mean difference=−0.81, 95% CI: −2.38 to 0.74).ConclusionsIt was feasible to deliver both models of clinically integrated EBM teaching. While students in the face-to-face model scored higher in EPs; there was no significant difference between the two models of teaching as measured by performances in the ACE tool or the summative assessments.


2021 ◽  
Vol 12 ◽  
Author(s):  
Jiying Han ◽  
Chao Gao ◽  
Jing Yang

This study investigated the relationships between university EFL teachers' perceived teaching support, teacher innovation, and teaching satisfaction in online teaching environments, especially the mediating role of teaching efficacy. The results of an online questionnaire survey with 473 university EFL teachers revealed that although online peer support did not directly make any difference to teacher innovation and teaching satisfaction, greater perceived support in the form of teaching resources and teaching autonomy improved university EFL teachers' online teaching satisfaction. Online teaching efficacy significantly mediated the relationships between teaching support and teacher innovation and satisfaction. The results offer significant implications for improving the effectiveness of EFL teaching and promoting university EFL teachers' innovation and satisfaction in online teaching environments.


2021 ◽  
Vol 12 ◽  
Author(s):  
Sabine Fabriz ◽  
Julia Mendzheritskaya ◽  
Sebastian Stehle

The sudden impact of the COVID-19 pandemic challenged universities to provide students with online teaching and learning settings that were both immediately applicable and supportive of quality learning. This resulted in a broad variety of synchronous and asynchronous online settings of teaching and learning. While some courses balanced both kinds, others offered either predominantly synchronous or asynchronous teaching and learning. In a survey study with students (N=3,056) and teachers (N=396) from a large German university, we explored whether a predominance of synchronous or asynchronous teaching and learning settings in higher education was associated with certain student experiences and outcomes. Additionally, we examined how well these two types of teaching and learning settings support students’ basic psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness proposed by self-determination theory (SDT). Data were collected after the first online semester due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The results imply that from the students’ perspective, the teaching methods involved in the two settings of teaching and learning differ with regard to their potential to support social interaction and to support basic psychological needs as proposed by SDT. Students who studied mostly in synchronous settings reported more peer-centered activities such as feedback in comparison to students in mostly asynchronous settings. In contrast, teachers perceived fewer differences between teaching methods in synchronous and asynchronous settings, especially regarding feedback activities. Further, students in mostly synchronous settings reported greater support of their basic psychological needs for competence support and relatedness as well as a greater overall satisfaction with the online term compared to students in mostly asynchronous settings. Across all students, greater fulfillment of psychological needs and higher technology acceptance coincided with outcomes that are more favorable. Implications for the post-pandemic classroom are drawn.


2021 ◽  
Vol 9 (10) ◽  
pp. 116
Author(s):  
Ana Badovinac ◽  
Matej Par ◽  
Laura Plančak ◽  
Marcela Daria Balić ◽  
Domagoj Vražić ◽  
...  

Purpose: Dental education institutions worldwide experienced disruptive changes amid the COVID-19 pandemic, with a rapid switch to the online learning format. Thus, this study aimed to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on dental education and evaluates the perceptions and attitudes of students towards the introduction of online learning in the School of Dental Medicine in Zagreb, Croatia. Methods: A survey was conducted on a population of undergraduate students. It was comprised of perceptions and attitudes of students on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their psychoemotional status, changes introduced in the educational system, and online learning in particular. Results: Of the 352 students that completed the survey, 66.2% of students reported being psychoemotionally affected by the lockdown. The most significant impact of the switch from in-person to online learning was observed in terms of missing contact with lecturers (60.3%) and peers (90.3%) and loss of practical courses, regarding which 65% of students agreed that they could not be compensated. While only 36.1% reported that online teaching fully met their expectations, the majority of the students (61.9%) agreed that online lectures were as valuable as in-person lectures and that the theoretical courses could be carried out online in the future as well (69.9%). Conclusions: Students reported relative satisfaction with changes in the learning format and a positive attitude towards online learning; however, several challenges and obstacles were identified.


2021 ◽  
Vol 99 (Supplement_3) ◽  
pp. 502-503
Author(s):  
Taylor Barnes ◽  
Jessica L Leatherwood ◽  
Kathrin Dunlap

Abstract The Covid-19 pandemic has required implantation of online education strategies, even for animal science courses, that are traditionally delivered face-to-face (F2F). As universities reopened many students were given the option of attending classes either F2F or remotely via live stream. This scenario, where some students are present in-person while others are present online simultaneously, is referred to as hiflex teaching. Face-to-face and online teaching strategies are established and literature contains pedagogical information, however hiflex teaching presents previously unencountered challenges. It can be difficult for instructors to maintain engagement with, essentially, two separative audiences of students. The objective was to address this issue by providing a graduate teaching assistant (TA) to large lecture courses, where traditionally TA positions were reserved only for lab courses. The hypothesis was that this would enable both audiences to receive appropriate focus. In this study, a TA attended the F2F lecture for an introductory equine science course (total students: n = 75; remote students: n= ~55), with the role of monitoring the simultaneous Zoom session with remote students. We found that questions from remote students increased when they had the ability to post them in real-time using the Zoom chat feature, as opposed waiting for a break in instruction in F2F situations. Having the TA present in the classroom enabled them to answer basic questions via Zoom, and to interact with the instructor should a question arise online that would benefit all students in the course. This allowed the instructor to effectively teach without taking up valuable class time alternating between programs on the computer and risking missing an online student question. This approach received positive feedback from the instructor and students alike. Additionally, it provided a novel teaching experience for a graduate TA. Similar strategies may be used to help to facilitate future success in hiflex courses.


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