Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction
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Published By Association For Computing Machinery

2573-0142

2022 ◽  
Vol 6 (GROUP) ◽  
pp. 1-14
Author(s):  
Douglas Zytko ◽  
Nicholas Mullins ◽  
Shelnesha Taylor ◽  
Richard H. Holler

Use and design of dating apps has evolved in recent years to accommodate other interaction goals beyond dating, prompting some researchers to now refer to these apps as people-nearby applications (PNAs). With this expansion of use comes increased potential for misinterpretation of users' goals for meeting face-to-face, which can pose risks to user safety particularly when disparities in sexual expectations occur. We present a survey study (n=132) with users of several PNAs and with various motivations for PNA-use to understand how interaction goals are disclosed and detected. The study finds such practices to be far from consistent, with some appearing highly susceptible to misinterpretation such as purposely delaying self-presentation of interaction goals until meeting face-to-face, and implying sexual expectations through vague references to "fun." We conclude by suggesting a modified version of the "swiping" feature in PNAs to facilitate consistent and overt self-presentation of interaction goals in ways that accommodate user tendencies discovered in the study.


2022 ◽  
Vol 6 (GROUP) ◽  
pp. 1-14
Author(s):  
Angela Mastrianni ◽  
Lynn Almengor ◽  
Aleksandra Sarcevic

In this study, we explore how clinical decision support features can be designed to aid teams in caring for patients during time-critical medical emergencies. We interviewed 12 clinicians with experience in leading pediatric trauma resuscitations to elicit design requirements for decision support alerts and how these alerts should be designed for teams with shared leadership. Based on the interview data, we identified three types of decision support alerts: reminders to perform tasks, alerts to changes in patient status, and suggestions for interventions. We also found that clinicians perceived alerts in this setting as coordination mechanisms and that some alert preferences were associated with leader experience levels. From these findings, we contribute three perspectives on how alerts can aid coordination and discuss implications for designing decision support alerts for shared leadership in time-critical medical processes.


2022 ◽  
Vol 6 (GROUP) ◽  
pp. 1-23
Author(s):  
John Fowler ◽  
Mark Zachry ◽  
David W. McDonald

The period of transition for foster youth into independent adulthood is an important life stage, and one that has yet to be explored in HCI circles. We studied an online community centered on the experiences of former foster youth through the first year of its existence to better understand how online spaces are being used by this population. Our mixed-method study included the coding of all posts from the first year of the online community and offers a mix of quantitative and qualitative findings. These findings include alignments and gaps in an established descriptive framework from the field of social work as it relates to the online communication of former foster youth. It also includes how the domains from the framework co-occur, and some potential implications of these co-occurrences. Future research on this subject is warranted, particularly related to why former foster youth seek online platforms to engage in conversations on these topics and how effective community members perceive the platform to be in safely and securely facilitating their needs.


2022 ◽  
Vol 6 (GROUP) ◽  
pp. 1-27
Author(s):  
Marc Janßen ◽  
Michael Prilla

Professional caregivers often face complex situations in which they need the support of a colleague or a specialist. This is especially necessary for caregivers during their training or with less practice in certain tasks. Due to time and space restrictions, colleagues or specialists are not always available for local support. Remote support by streaming videos to a remote helper has been discussed in healthcare domains as a so-called teleconsultation. However, little is known about how to apply teleconsultation in care. We conducted a study with caregivers and remote helpers to compare head mounted devices (HMDs) for teleconsultation in care to two alternative solutions using smartphones. We found that despite lacking familiarity, HMDs have good potential for remote support in care, and that creating video streams with smartphones is not preferable for teleconsultations. We suggest that ideal support needs to balance freedom and guidance and suggest how such support needs to be further explored.


2022 ◽  
Vol 6 (GROUP) ◽  
pp. 1-28
Author(s):  
Abhinav Choudhry ◽  
Jinda Han ◽  
Xiaoyu Xu ◽  
Yun Huang

Virtual Influencers (VIs) are computer-generated characters, many of which are often visually indistinguishable from humans and interact with the world in the first-person perspective as social media influencers. They are gaining popularity by creating content in various areas, including fashion, music, art, sports, games, environmental sustainability, and mental health. Marketing firms and brands increasingly use them to capitalise on their millions of followers. Yet, little is known about what prompts people to engage with these digital beings. In this paper, we present our interview study with online users who followed different VIs on Instagram beyond the fashion application domain. Our findings show that the followers are attracted to VIs due to a unique mixture of visual appeal, sense of mystery, and creative storytelling that sets VI content apart from that of real human influencers. Specifically, VI content enables digital artists and content creators by removing the constraints of bodies and physical features. The followers not only perceived VIs' rising popularity in commercial industries, but also are supportive of VI involvement in non-commercial causes and campaigns. However, followers are reluctant to attribute trustworthiness to VIs in general though they display trust in limited domains, e.g., technology, music, games, and art. This research highlights VI's potential as innovative digital content, carrying influence and employing more varied creators, an appeal that could be harnessed by diverse industries and also by public interest organisations.


2022 ◽  
Vol 6 (GROUP) ◽  
pp. 1-22
Author(s):  
Shamika Klassen ◽  
Sara Kingsley ◽  
Kalyn McCall ◽  
Joy Weinberg ◽  
Casey Fiesler

The Negro Motorist Green Book was a publication that offered resources for the Black traveler from 1936 to 1966. More than a directory of Black-friendly businesses, it also offered articles that provided insights for how best to travel safely, engagement with readers through contests and invitations for readers to share travel stories, and even civil rights advocacy. Today, a contemporary counterpart to the Green Book is Black Twitter, where people share information and advocate for their community. By conducting qualitative open coding on a subset of Green Book editions as well as tweets from Black Twitter, we explore similarities and overlapping characteristics such as safety, information sharing, and social justice. Where they diverge exposes how spaces like Black Twitter have evolved to accommodate the needs of people in the Black diaspora beyond the scope of physical travel and into digital spaces. Our research points to ways that the Black community has shifted from the physical to the digital space, expanding how it supports itself, and the potential for research to strengthen throughlines between the past and the present in order to better see the possibilities of the future.


2022 ◽  
Vol 6 (GROUP) ◽  
pp. 1-14
Author(s):  
Lindah Kotut ◽  
D. Scott McCrickard

Privacy policy and term agreement documents are considered the gateway for software adoption and use. The documents provide a means for the provider to outline expectations of the software use, and also provide an often-separate document outlining how user data is collected, stored, and used--including if it is shared with other parties. A user agreeing with the terms, assumes that they have a full understanding the terms of the agreement and have provided consent. Often however, users do not read the documents because they are long and full of legalistic and inconsistent language, are regularly amended, and may not disclose all the details on what is done to the user data. Enforcing compliance and ensuring user consent have been persistent challenges to policy makers and privacy researchers. This design fiction puts forward an alternate reality and presents a policy-based approach to fording the consent gap with the TL;DR Charter: an agreement governing the parties involved by harnessing the power of formal governments, industry, and other stakeholders, and taking users expectation of privacy into account. The Charter allows us as researchers to examine the implications on trust, decision-making, consent, accountability and the impact of future technologies.


2022 ◽  
Vol 6 (GROUP) ◽  
pp. 1-33
Author(s):  
Janghee Cho ◽  
Samuel Beck ◽  
Stephen Voida

The COVID-19 pandemic fundamentally changed the nature of work by shifting most in-person work to a predominantly remote modality as a way to limit the spread of the coronavirus. In the process, the shift to working-from-home rapidly forced the large-scale adoption of groupware technologies. Although prior empirical research examined the experience of working-from-home within small-scale groups and for targeted kinds of work, the pandemic provides HCI and CSCW researchers with an unprecedented opportunity to understand the psycho-social impacts of a universally mandated work-from-home experience rather than an autonomously chosen one. Drawing on boundary theory and a methodological approach grounded in humanistic geography, we conducted a qualitative analysis of Reddit data drawn from two work-from-home-related subreddits between March 2020 and January 2021. In this paper, we present a characterization of the challenges and solutions discussed within these online communities for adapting work to a hybrid or fully remote modality, managing reconfigured work-life boundaries, and reconstructing the home's sense of place to serve multiple, sometimes conflicting roles. We discuss how these findings suggest an emergent interplay among adapted work practice, reimagined physical (and virtual) spaces, and the establishment and continual re-negotiation of boundaries as a means for anticipating the long-term impact of COVID on future conceptualizations of productivity and work.


2022 ◽  
Vol 6 (GROUP) ◽  
pp. 1-18
Author(s):  
Fanlu Gui ◽  
Chun-Hua Tsai ◽  
John M. Carroll

Volunteers in non-profit groups are a valuable workforce that contributes to economic development and supports people in need in the U.S. However, many non-profit groups face challenges including engaging and sustaining volunteer participation, as well as increasing visibility of their work in the community. To support non-profit groups' service, we explored how engaging community members in the volunteer-acknowledgment process may have an impact. We set up workstations and invited community members to write thank-you cards to volunteers in non-profit groups. We conducted 14 interviews with volunteers and community members, collected and analyzed 25 thank-you cards. We found that the acknowledgment activity can help circulate social goods through multiple stakeholders, that authenticity was valued in the acknowledgment process, and that non-profit groups intended to distribute, reuse, and publicize the acknowledgments to utilize them to a fuller extent. Our contributions include expanding knowledge on experiences, needs, and impact of community acknowledgment from different stakeholders, as well as presenting design opportunities.


2022 ◽  
Vol 6 (GROUP) ◽  
pp. 1-23
Author(s):  
Jessica Z. Wang ◽  
Amy X. Zhang ◽  
David R. Karger

Society is showing signs of strong ideological polarization. When pushed to seek perspectives different from their own, people often reject diverse ideas or find them unfathomable. Work has shown that framing controversial issues using the values of the audience can improve understanding of opposing views. In this paper, we present our work designing systems for addressing ideological division through educating U.S. news consumers to engage using a framework of fundamental human values known as Moral Foundations. We design and implement a series of new features that encourage users to challenge their understanding of opposing views, including annotation of moral frames in news articles, discussion of those frames via inline comments, and recommendations based on relevant moral frames. We describe two versions of features---the first covering a suite of ways to interact with moral framing in news, and the second tailored towards collaborative annotation and discussion. We conduct a field evaluation of each design iteration with 71 participants in total over a period of 6-8 days, finding evidence suggesting users learned to re-frame their discourse in moral values of the opposing side. Our work provides several design considerations for building systems to engage with moral framing.


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