Journal of Baltic Science Education
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571
(FIVE YEARS 375)

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6
(FIVE YEARS 6)

Published By Scientia Socialis Ltd

2538-7138, 1648-3898

2021 ◽  
Vol 20 (6) ◽  
pp. 969-982
Author(s):  
King-Dow Su

The presented research focuses on verifying the confluent application of concept mapping (CM) and socio-scientific issues (SSI) according to the value-laden and moral dilemma orientation to construct problem-solving performance. This research sets up some perspectives for all 146 participants, including 139 students and 7 experts. All findings reveal that the design of SSICM contexts includes a rebuttal process and incense claim to improve students' argument response (16.4%), to increase content knowledge and illuminate their science learning by argumentations. To develop an assessment tool with high validity and reliability (Cronbach's α > .9) and find positive presentations of all learning attitudes in the SSICM context, learning environment and results will concern the best argumentation process. Students’ interview responses and SWOT analysis of teachers indicate that SSICM's use of argument in the classroom is a real benefit. The research provided a better paradigm of attempts to combine analytical and academic hypotheses to explain literature sources by teachers, researchers, textbook developers, and editors. Keywords: concept mapping (CM), problem-solving, socio-scientific issues (SSI), SSICM contexts


2021 ◽  
Vol 20 (6) ◽  
pp. 906-923
Author(s):  
Minsu Ha ◽  
Yustika Sya’bandari ◽  
Ai Nurlaelasari Rusmana ◽  
Rahmi Qurota Aini ◽  
Sarah Meilani Fadillah

Scientific reasoning ability is essential to get developed in the current digital age, particularly in the process of judgement and decision-making in complex problems. Few studies have conducted an in-depth exploration of scientific reasoning ability, especially in relation to the confidence level and gender. The scientific reasoning ability of Indonesian upper-secondary school and university students were examined and compared with previous recorded data of US students. In this study, the data were collected from 372 university and 528 upper-secondary education students in Indonesia. Students’ scientific reasoning ability was measured using a scientific formal reasoning test (FORT). In addition, confidence level and metacognitive data was collected through self-reported measures. Two-way ANOVA was performed to compare mean differences between groups based on academic level and gender and to observe interaction between the variables. Students’ confidence level in selecting the correct answer and distractor answer was analyzed using an independent t-test. The results reveal that many Indonesian students selected specific distractors with relatively high confidence. Moreover, upper-secondary school students and female students selected more distractors than the groups’ counterparts. Finally, the factors related to Indonesian students’ responses to the scientific formal reasoning were discussed. Keywords: confidence level, distractor analysis, gender differences, scientific (formal) reasoning test, scientific reasoning ability, Indonesian student


2021 ◽  
Vol 20 (6) ◽  
pp. 983-1000
Author(s):  
Jia-Wen Xiang ◽  
Cai-Qin Han

Employers believe that people with the ability to work in teams can bring success to their business. Therefore, it is very essential to start cultivating students' teamwork skills in lower-secondary school to prepare students for the future. This study took "Physics in Bicycles" as an example to explore the effect of Teaching and Learning-Scrum (TL-Scrum) on students' physics achievement and team collaboration ability. It was conducted at a lower-secondary school in Changsha, China. "Physical Knowledge of Bicycles" Test and "Team Collaboration Ability" Measurement were applied to the two groups prior to and following the experiment. The experimental group (N=61) participated in TL-Scrum teaching, whereas the control group (N=58) participated without TL-Scrum teaching. The results revealed a significant difference between the two groups, with the experimental group learners performing better than the control group in the academic achievement. In addition, the results showed better positive effects of TL-Scrum on experimental group learners in team collaboration ability. Results suggested that learners achieved better academic achievements and team collaboration with the approach of TL-Scrum, which pointed to certain implications for physics teaching research, as well as in education of future physics teachers. Keywords: lower-secondary school students, physics education, team collaboration, TL-Scrum


2021 ◽  
Vol 20 (6) ◽  
pp. 894-905
Author(s):  
Tamirirofa Chirikure

Practical work is ubiquitous in science education, but its enactment is challenging in remote teaching contexts. The situation was exacerbated due to a moratorium on contact classes induced by the COVID-19 pandemic that necessitated strict health protocols. Home-based practical work (HBPW) became a significant option as academic institutions shifted to emergency remote teaching. The question is whether HBPW provides equivalent learning experiences in comparison to laboratory-based practical work (LBPW). This research therefore explored pre-service science teachers’ experiences of HBPW implemented at a particular South African university. Eighty-four preservice science teachers, who engaged in HBPW in a chemistry module, were purposively selected as the participants. The data were generated through individual reflections at the end of the semester. An adaption of the equivalence theory was ideal in analysing and interpreting the results. Results show that HBPW was flexible, empowering, contextualised, and enhanced active learning. New forms of interaction emerged in the absence of physical student-teacher and student-student interactions. Concerns over its ability to develop practical skills are expressed. Recommendations are made with a view to optimising HBPW. Keywords: emergency remote teaching, home-based practical work, laboratory-based practical work, pre-service science teachers, student-teacher interactions


2021 ◽  
Vol 20 (6) ◽  
pp. 864-867
Author(s):  
Todar Lakhvich

In previous editorial (Lakhvich, 2021) we have discussed three comprehensive roles of Science Education, determining its contribution to our life: if briefly, (1) Science Education gives the methodology to digest facts via the experiment, reasoning, and discussion; (2) Science Education gives rise to the development of logics, problem-solving skills, complements the command of language, social communication and etc.; (3) Science Education develops specific person’s thinking skills involved in inquiry, experimentation, evidence evaluation, speculation argumentation, and finally, inference. In this issue we pursue the topic discussing two more roles the Science Education contributes to our life


2021 ◽  
Vol 20 (6) ◽  
pp. 924-941
Author(s):  
Najah Hazirah Mohd Dzin ◽  
Yoon Fah Lay

Multiple choice tests are widely applied to assess students’ knowledge in science education. This study aimed at assessing the validity and reliability of Science Multiple-choice Test in Malaysia. The items for this test were formulated by the researcher together with a panel of science teachers and the head of the science department with close reference to Secondary School Standard Curriculum (KSSM) syllabus. The test consists of 50 multiple-choice items with four options. Rasch measurement model was adopted to evaluate the quality of the Science Multiple-choice Test in terms of reliability analysis, item polarity analysis (PTMEA-CORR), item fit analysis and Principal Component Analysis of Residuals (PCAR). The reliability analysis was performed using Cronbach’s Alpha, and the results of reliability and separation index respectively indicated good reliability level of the test items. In order to improve the validity of the test, two negatively worded items (Q39 and Q40) were removed. Lastly, the PCAR analysis showed the unexplained variance in the 1st contrast (5.4%) was found to be well controlled and was below the ceiling value of one-third of the variance explained by the item (18.7%). However, the positive value of the disattenuated correlations indicate no evidence of the presence of secondary dimension. Keywords: multiple-choice test, Rasch measurement model, reliability and validity, science subject, secondary school standard curriculum


2021 ◽  
Vol 20 (6) ◽  
pp. 881-893
Author(s):  
José Luís Araújo ◽  
Carla Morais ◽  
João Carlos Paiva

The promotion of positive attitudes towards science is an important goal of science education. This research aimed to identify students' attitudes towards science and whether their participation within a citizen science project has contributed to positive attitudinal changes. So, an attitudinal scale was developed, validated, and applied (as a pre and post-test) to 574 students aged between 12 and 14 years old. Positive attitudes towards science were recorded from the outset among children of both groups. Students' participation within the experimental group enhanced relevant positive attitudinal changes at the level of the critical analysis dimension, related to the perception of skills development such as questioning or critical thinking. Furthermore, positive attitudinal changes were achieved within the affinity dimension, related to perceived self-efficacy and appreciation of science and science classes. Positive attitudinal changes towards science among students indicate that citizen science contributes to enhance affective and attitudinal domains of their scientific literacy. Keywords: attitudes towards science scale, attitudinal changes, citizen science, science education, water quality monitoring


2021 ◽  
Vol 20 (6) ◽  
pp. 868-880
Author(s):  
Cenk Akay ◽  
Sedat Kanadli

There is a contradiction in the literature about the effect of REACT strategy on science achievement. This study aims to resolve this contradiction by determining the effect of REACT strategy on student science achievement and the factors affecting this strategy by integrating findings obtained from both qualitative and quantitative studies. The study was conducted using a mixed-research synthesis by including 19 quantitative and 10 qualitative studies. Data obtained from quantitative findings were combined using a meta-analysis method, and data from qualitative findings were combined using a thematic synthesis method. It was attempted to explain the variance between studies included in the meta-analysis by using analytic themes derived from the thematic synthesis. As a result of the meta-analysis, teaching based on the REACT strategy was found to have a strong effect on science achievement (ES = 1.041, 95% CI: 0.7876 to 1.2948). The thematic synthesis yielded four descriptive themes, “teaching-learning process in the REACT strategy”, “learning outcomes in the REACT strategy”, “limitations of the REACT strategy”, and “recommendations for practice”. Teaching based on the REACT strategy was found to contribute largely to the learning process and learning outcomes. Some limitations were found in practice, and recommendations were determined to address these limitations. Keywords: contextual teaching, mixed research synthesis, REACT strategy, science education


2021 ◽  
Vol 20 (6) ◽  
pp. 942-955
Author(s):  
Chu-yu Ou ◽  
Shao-Rui Xu ◽  
Chu-ting Lu ◽  
Shao-Na Zhou ◽  
Hua Xiao

Flow experience plays a major role in influencing students’ interest of STEM, which is the key to promote STEM talent development. Various teaching behaviors contribute differently to student learning performance and flow experience. Specifically, this research sought to concretely explore the different influences of Autonomy-supportive (AS) teaching behavior and Controlling (C) teaching behavior on students’ STEM learning performance and flow experience. The research conducted an experimental exploration of STEM project among primary school students in two groups with two different teaching behaviors (AS and C) respectively. T-test and ANCOVA analysis revealed that both teaching behaviors greatly contributed to improvement of students’ learning performance. MANCOVA analysis showed that students in Autonomy-supportive group got slightly significant higher flow experience than those in Control group. Regarding flow constructs, both groups had the similar level of engagement, but students in Autonomy-supportive group had higher enjoyment, and stronger control than those in the other group. In other words, Autonomy-supportive teaching behavior and Controlling teaching behavior both enhanced greatly students’ STEM learning performance. While Autonomy-supportive teaching behavior allowed students to be more enjoyable and have a higher level of control in STEM learning. Keywords: autonomy-supportive teaching, controlling teaching, flow experience, learning performance, intrinsic motivation, STEM project


2021 ◽  
Vol 20 (6) ◽  
pp. 956-968
Author(s):  
Feyzi Osman Pekel

Although "Reproduction, Growth, and Development in Living Things" (RGDLT) is a core topic in the Turkish science curriculum, it is known that students have difficulties in understanding. Integrating concept cartoons and argumentation into the teaching of this unit has the potential to promote students' interest and understanding. This research is the first to compare the effects of concept cartoons and argumentation-based concept cartoons on students' academic achievement in teaching sixth grade RGDLT subjects. The research was performed with two experimental groups and one control group in a secondary school in Turkey. A quasi-experimental research design was used in the research. Analysis of the post-test results revealed that the success of the group using concept cartoons was higher than the control group, but more importantly, the success of the group using argumentation-based concept cartoons was higher than the group using concept cartoons. The results of this research indicate that the academic achievement of students can be increased significantly when concept cartoons and argumentation-based concept cartoon activities are used in addition to the constructivist methods in teaching these subjects. The results of the research serve as a guide for teachers and researchers interested in teaching science and biology subjects. Keywords: argumentation, biology education, concept cartoons, living things, quasi-experimental research


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