car t cell
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2022 ◽  
Vol 146 ◽  
pp. 112512
Author(s):  
Ali Zarezadeh Mehrabadi ◽  
Reza Ranjbar ◽  
Mahdieh Farzanehpour ◽  
Alireza Shahriary ◽  
Ruhollah Dorostkar ◽  
...  

Human Cell ◽  
2022 ◽  
Author(s):  
Tian Huan ◽  
Dongfeng Chen ◽  
Guodong Liu ◽  
Hailing Zhang ◽  
Xiaoyan Wang ◽  
...  

2022 ◽  
Author(s):  
Vardges Tserunyan ◽  
Stacey D Finley

In recent decades, chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have been successfully used to generate engineered T cells capable of recognizing and eliminating cancer cells. The structure of CARs frequently includes costimulatory domains, which enhance the T cell response upon antigen encounter. However, it is not fully known how the CAR co-stimulatory domains influence T cell activation in the presence of biological variability. In this work, we used mathematical modeling to elucidate how the inclusion of one such co-stimulatory molecule, CD28, impacts the response of a population of engineered T cells under different sources of variability. Particularly, our simulations demonstrate that CD28-bearing CARs mediate a faster and more consistent population response under both target antigen variability and kinetic rate variability. We identify kinetic parameters that have the most impact on mediating cell activation. Finally, based on our findings, we propose that enhancing the catalytic activity of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) can result in drastically reduced and more consistent response times among heterogeneous CAR T cell populations.


2022 ◽  
Vol 23 (2) ◽  
pp. 903
Author(s):  
Avinoam Reichman ◽  
Alexander Kunz ◽  
Jara J. Joedicke ◽  
Uta E. Höpken ◽  
Anna Keib ◽  
...  

Chimeric-antigen-receptor (CAR)-T-cell therapy is already widely used to treat patients who are relapsed or refractory to chemotherapy, antibodies, or stem-cell transplantation. Multiple myeloma still constitutes an incurable disease. CAR-T-cell therapy that targets BCMA (B-cell maturation antigen) is currently revolutionizing the treatment of those patients. To monitor and improve treatment outcomes, methods to detect CAR-T cells in human peripheral blood are highly desirable. In this study, three different detection reagents for staining BCMA-CAR-T cells by flow cytometry were compared. Moreover, a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to detect BCMA-CAR-T cells was established. By applying a cell-titration experiment of BCMA-CAR-T cells, both methods were compared head-to-head. In flow-cytometric analysis, the detection reagents used in this study could all detect BCMA-CAR-T cells at a similar level. The results of false-positive background staining differed as follows (standard deviation): the BCMA-detection reagent used on the control revealed a background staining of 0.04% (±0.02%), for the PE-labeled human BCMA peptide it was 0.25% (±0.06%) and for the polyclonal anti-human IgG antibody it was 7.2% (±9.2%). The ability to detect BCMA-CAR-T cells down to a concentration of 0.4% was similar for qPCR and flow cytometry. The qPCR could detect even lower concentrations (0.02–0.01%). In summary, BCMA-CAR-T-cell monitoring can be reliably performed by both flow cytometry and qPCR. In flow cytometry, reagents with low background staining should be preferred.


2022 ◽  
Vol 20 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Ali Zarezadeh Mehrabadi ◽  
Fatemeh Roozbahani ◽  
Reza Ranjbar ◽  
Mahdieh Farzanehpour ◽  
Alireza Shahriary ◽  
...  

Abstract Background Cancer is one of the critical issues of the global health system with a high mortality rate even with the available therapies, so using novel therapeutic approaches to reduce the mortality rate and increase the quality of life is sensed more than ever. Main body CAR-T cell therapy and oncolytic viruses are innovative cancer therapeutic approaches with fewer complications than common treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy and significantly improve the quality of life. Oncolytic viruses can selectively proliferate in the cancer cells and destroy them. The specificity of oncolytic viruses potentially maintains the normal cells and tissues intact. T-cells are genetically manipulated and armed against the specific antigens of the tumor cells in CAR-T cell therapy. Eventually, they are returned to the body and act against the tumor cells. Nowadays, virology and oncology researchers intend to improve the efficacy of immunotherapy by utilizing CAR-T cells in combination with oncolytic viruses. Conclusion Using CAR-T cells along with oncolytic viruses can enhance the efficacy of CAR-T cell therapy in destroying the solid tumors, increasing the permeability of the tumor cells for T-cells, reducing the disturbing effects of the immune system, and increasing the success chance in the treatment of this hazardous disease. In recent years, significant progress has been achieved in using oncolytic viruses alone and in combination with other therapeutic approaches such as CAR-T cell therapy in pre-clinical and clinical investigations. This principle necessitates a deeper consideration of these treatment strategies. This review intends to curtly investigate each of these therapeutic methods, lonely and in combination form. We will also point to the pre-clinical and clinical studies about the use of CAR-T cell therapy combined with oncolytic viruses.


2022 ◽  
Vol 11 ◽  
Author(s):  
Oren Pasvolsky ◽  
May Daher ◽  
Gheath Alatrash ◽  
David Marin ◽  
Naval Daver ◽  
...  

Despite advances in the understanding of the genetic landscape of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the addition of targeted biological and epigenetic therapies to the available armamentarium, achieving long-term disease-free survival remains an unmet need. Building on growing knowledge of the interactions between leukemic cells and their bone marrow microenvironment, strategies to battle AML by immunotherapy are under investigation. In the current review we describe the advances in immunotherapy for AML, with a focus on chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy. CARs constitute powerful immunologic modalities, with proven clinical success in B-Cell malignancies. We discuss the challenges and possible solutions for CAR T cell therapy development in AML, and examine the path currently being paved by preclinical and clinical efforts, from autologous to allogeneic products.


Author(s):  
Raphael Teipel ◽  
Frank P Kroschinsky ◽  
Michael Kramer ◽  
Theresa Kretschmann ◽  
Katharina Egger-Heidrich ◽  
...  

Inflammation plays an important role in CAR-T-cell therapy, especially in the pathophysiology of cytokine-release syndrome (CRS) and immune effector cell-associated neurotoxicity syndrome (ICANS). Clonal hematopoiesis of indetermined potential (CHIP) has also been associated with chronic inflammation. The relevance of CHIP in the context of CAR-T-cell treatment is currently widely unknown. We longitudinally evaluated the prevalence of CHIP, using a targeted deep sequencing approach in a cohort of patients with r/r B-NHL before and after CAR-T-cell treatment. The aim was to define the prevalence and variation of CHIP over time and to assess the influence on clinical inflammation syndromes (CRS/ICANS), cytopenia and outcome. Overall, 32 patients were included. CHIP was found in 11 of 32 patients (34 %) before CAR-T-cell therapy. CHIP progression was commonly detected in the later course. Patients with CHIP showed a comparable response rate to CAR-T-cell treatment but had an improved OS (not reached vs. 265 days, p=0.003). No significant difference was observed in terms of the occurrence and severity of CRS/ICANS, therapeutic usage of tocilizumab and glucocorticosteroids, paraclinical markers of inflammation (except ferritin) or dynamics of hematopoietic recovery. CHIP is commonly observed in patients undergoing CD19-directed CAR-T-cell therapy and is not associated with an inferior outcome.


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