Urologic Cancers
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Author(s):  
Paola Bertuccio ◽  
Claudia Santucci ◽  
Greta Carioli ◽  
Matteo Malvezzi ◽  
Carlo La Vecchia ◽  
...  

Author(s):  
J. Stangl-Kremser ◽  
A. Mari ◽  
L. Y. Lai ◽  
C. T. Lee ◽  
R. Vince ◽  
...  

Cancers ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 13 (7) ◽  
pp. 1529
Author(s):  
Catarina Lourenço ◽  
Vera Constâncio ◽  
Rui Henrique ◽  
Ângela Carvalho ◽  
Carmen Jerónimo

Urologic cancers are a heterogeneous group of tumors, some of which have poor prognosis. This is partly due to the unavailability of specific and sensitive diagnostic techniques and monitoring tests, ideally non- or minimally invasive. Hence, liquid biopsies are promising tools that have been gaining significant attention over the last decade. Among the different classes of biomarkers that can be isolated from biofluids, urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) are a promising low-invasive source of biomarkers, with the potential to improve cancer diagnosis and disease management. Different techniques have been developed to isolate and characterize the cargo of these vesicles; however, no consensus has been reached, challenging the comparison among studies. This results in a vast number of studies portraying an extensive list of uEV-derived candidate biomarkers for urologic cancers, with the potential to improve clinical outcome; however, without significant validation. Herein, we review the current published research on miRNA and protein-derived uEV for prostate, bladder and kidney cancers, focusing on different uEV isolation methods, and its implications for biomarker studies.


Author(s):  
So Yeon Kim ◽  
Eun Kyung Choe ◽  
Manu Shivakumar ◽  
Dokyoon Kim ◽  
Kyung-Ah Sohn

Abstract Motivation To better understand the molecular features of cancers, a comprehensive analysis using multi-omics data has been conducted. In addition, a pathway activity inference method has been developed to facilitate the integrative effects of multiple genes. In this respect, we have recently proposed a novel integrative pathway activity inference approach, iDRW and demonstrated the effectiveness of the method with respect to dichotomizing two survival groups. However, there were several limitations, such as a lack of generality. In this study, we designed a directed gene–gene graph using pathway information by assigning interactions between genes in multiple layers of networks. Results As a proof-of-concept study, it was evaluated using three genomic profiles of urologic cancer patients. The proposed integrative approach achieved improved outcome prediction performances compared with a single genomic profile alone and other existing pathway activity inference methods. The integrative approach also identified common/cancer-specific candidate driver pathways as predictive prognostic features in urologic cancers. Furthermore, it provides better biological insights into the prioritized pathways and genes in an integrated view using a multi-layered gene–gene network. Our framework is not specifically designed for urologic cancers and can be generally applicable for various datasets. Availability and implementation iDRW is implemented as the R software package. The source codes are available at https://github.com/sykim122/iDRW. Supplementary information Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Xiong Xiong ◽  
Wei He ◽  
Bin Xiong ◽  
Feng Yao

Abstract Background The urinary bladder tumour antigen (BTA) stat test has already been used for the diagnosis and monitoring of bladder cancer (BC). However, more evidence is needed regarding its efficacy and utility in the clinic. In this study, we investigated the influence of haematuria on the performance of the BTA stat test in a clinical cohort.Methods Urine samples from 836 subjects, including 50 healthy volunteers, 553 patients with benign urologic disorders, 124 patients with histologically proven BC, and 109 patients with other histologically proven urologic cancers, were analysed by the BTA stat test and urinalysis. We detected the sensitivity and specificity of the BTA stat test in each group and analysed the effect of haematuria on the specificity.Results Our data show that 58.06% of patients in the BC group had haematuria. Haematuria with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), renal hamartoma (RH) and urolithiasis were identified in 39.01%, 42.86% and 66.49% of patients with benign urologic disorders, respectively. Haematuria was identified in 48.72% of prostatic cancer patients and 67.74% of renal cancer patients. The overall sensitivity of the BTA stat test was 90.32%. The sensitivity was 97.22% in BC patients with haematuria and 80.77% in BC patients without haematuria. The overall specificity in healthy individuals, patients with benign urologic disorders and patients with other urologic cancers was 50.84%. In all patients with haematuria, the specificity of the BTA stat test was 15.82%, while the specificity was 72.6% in patients without haematuria.Conclusions Haematuria has a significant influence on the BTA stat test. The performance of the BTA stat test can be increased if patients with known or obvious haematuria conditions are excluded from the test.


Author(s):  
Jennifer A. Vencill ◽  
Elizabeth L. Kacel ◽  
Svetlana Avulova ◽  
Shawna L. Ehlers
Keyword(s):  

2020 ◽  
Author(s):  
Xiong Xiong ◽  
Wei He ◽  
Bin Xiong ◽  
Feng Yao

Abstract Background: The urinary bladder tumour antigen (BTA) stat test has already been used for the diagnosis and monitoring of bladder cancer (BC). However, more evidence is needed regarding its efficacy and utility in the clinic. In this study, we investigated the influence of haematuria on the performance of the BTA stat test in a clinical cohort. Methods: Urine samples from 836 subjects, including 50 healthy volunteers, 553 patients with benign urologic disorders, 124 patients with histologically proven BC, and 109 patients with other histologically proven urologic cancers, were analysed by the BTA stat test and urinalysis. We detected the sensitivity and specificity of the BTA stat test in each group, and analysed the effect of haematuria on the specificity. Results: Our data showed that 58.06% of patients had haematuria in the BC group. Haematuria with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), renal hamartoma (RH) and urolithiasis were identified in 39.01%, 42.86% and 66.49% of patients with benign urologic disorders, respectively. Haematuria was identified in 48.72% of prostatic cancer patients and 67.74% of renal cancer patients. The overall sensitivity of the BTA stat test was 90.32%. The sensitivity was 97.22% in BC patients with haematuria and 80.77% in BC patients without haematuria. The overall specificity in healthy individuals, patients with benign urologic disorders and other urologic cancers was 50.84%. In all patients with haematuria, the specificity of the BTA stat test was 15.82%, while it was 72.6% in patients without haematuria. Conclusions: Haematuria has a significant influence on the BTA stat test. Thus, this test should not be used for the diagnosis of bladder cancer in patients with haematuria.


2020 ◽  
Vol 20 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Yilong Huang ◽  
Yunfeng Gao ◽  
Yushen Wu ◽  
Huapeng Lin

Abstract Background Several studies have reported that the systemic immune-inflammation index (SII) is associated with the prognosis of patients with urologic cancers (UCs). The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the prognostic value of SII in UC patients. Methods We searched public databases for relevant published studies on the prognostic value of SII in UC patients. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were extracted and pooled to assess the relationships between SII and overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), overall response rate (ORR) and disease control rate (DCR). Results A total of 14 studies with 3074 patients were included. From the pooled results, we found that high SII was associated with worse overall survival (OS) in patients with UC (HR 2.58, 95% CI 1.59–4.21). Patients with high SII values also had poorer PFS (HR 1.92, 95% CI 1.29–2.88) and CSS (HR 2.58, 95% CI 1.36–4.91) as well as lower ORRs (HR 0.40, 95% CI 0.22–0.71) than patients with low SII values. In addition, the subgroup analysis of OS and PFS showed that the prognosis of patients with high SII was worse than that of patients with low SII. Conclusions SII might be a promising noninvasive predictor in patients with UC. However, more samples and multicenter studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of SII in predicting the prognosis of patients with UC.


2020 ◽  
Vol 9 (5) ◽  
pp. 2348-2357
Author(s):  
Joseph T. Davis ◽  
Lars M. Wagner
Keyword(s):  

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