Human Dignity
Recently Published Documents


TOTAL DOCUMENTS

3592
(FIVE YEARS 1904)

H-INDEX

30
(FIVE YEARS 11)

2022 ◽  
Vol 75 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Alexandre Ernesto Silva ◽  
Elysângela Dittz Duarte ◽  
Sérgio Joaquim Deodato Fernandes

ABSTRACT Objectives: to analyze palliative care production developed by health professionals to home care patients. Methods: this is an exploratory study, with a qualitative approach, using the transpersonal care theoretical framework. Thirteen interviews were conducted with health professionals and 18 observations were conducted on different cases. Content analysis was performed using MAXQDA©. Results: actions performed: maintenance and follow-up measures to people eligible for palliative care, in acts of dialogue and "listening" to caregivers and users, conducting guidelines for the care and self-care process, performing technical procedures, delivery of materials, referrals and medical prescriptions to users. Final Considerations: it is perceived the need for advances in the implementation of government policies in Brazil that insert palliative care into the Health Care Network through educational, managerial and care actions that ensure human dignity, thus allowing the development of these and other palliative care interventions.


Author(s):  
Tina Kotzé ◽  
Zsa-Zsa Boggenpoel

The Covid-19 pandemic, with its concomitant "stay at home" catchphrase, has certainly made living together as neighbours in a constitutional dispensation more tangible. Conflicts between neighbours will inevitably increase, especially in a time when citizens from different social, cultural, customary or religious backgrounds and with different rights and interests are restricted to the boundaries of their properties as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. The pandemic has provided us with the impetus to reflect upon the notion of "reasonableness" in neighbour law, particularly nuisance law in the narrow sense. In this context the role of neighbour law is ordinarily to regulate the relationship between neighbours. Therefore, neighbour law is crucial in that it resolves conflicts that arise between neighbours due to their everyday use of their properties. Whether the nuisance is objectively reasonable or goes beyond that which can be reasonably tolerable under the circumstances requires weighing up various factors dependant on the prevailing circumstances, rights, interests, values and obligations of the neighbours and the community. In the constitutional dispensation, based on the values of human dignity, equality, and freedom, this may inadvertently require courts to balance out and reconcile often opposing constitutional rights. To this end the underlying principle of nuisance law encapsulated in the phrases "give and take" and "live and let live" arguably already encapsulates the notion of balancing respective rights (constitutional or otherwise) and interests given the context of each case. However, courts do not always correctly apply the reasonableness test in a principled and coherent fashion, as illustrated in Ellaurie v Madrasah Taleemuddeen Islamic Institute 2021 2 SA 163 (KZD). This may lead to the conclusion that constitutional rights are ignored when the reasonableness test for nuisance law is applied. It is necessary to reconceptualise the reasonableness test in order to ensure that the common law is infused with constitutional values. There are numerous ways in which the ideals and values of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (and even specific constitutional rights other than property rights) could be advanced if courts were more willing (not being held back by conservatism) and able (equipped with the necessary vocabulary) to apply the common law in line with the Constitution. It is pivotal that courts apply the reasonableness test correctly, considering all the relevant circumstances of the case, including the broader constitutional values and ideals such as ubuntu. It is arguable that if this were done, nuisance law would have a greater potential to incorporate a wider range of rights, interests and values so that the outcomes would be fairer and more equitable, which is, after all, the goal of the reasonableness standard in neighbour law.


Author(s):  
Satarupa Dasgupta ◽  
Sunny Sinha ◽  
Raina Roy

This article investigates the impact of COVID-19 on the health and lived experiences of the transgender community in India. In particular, the study analyses how COVID-19 affects the lives of the transgender community in terms of their interaction with the government policymaking and identity negotiation, livelihoods, access to health resources, availability of gender transition services and status of mental health. The analysis shows that the COVID-19 pandemic and the government strategies to curb the spread of infection have exacerbated the challenges faced by the transgender community in India and threatened their survival. As disease outbreaks traditionally perpetuate gender inequities and increase vulnerabilities borne by marginalised groups, the analysis has implications for purposefully creating appropriate platforms for participation of the transgender community and designing and delivering suitable programs and services to enhance their welling and human dignity.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Elinda dwi sari

Human rights are fundamental rights and freedoms for all people, regardless of nationality, gender, gender, national or ethnic origin, race, religion, language or other status. Two values form the basis of the concept of human rights. The first is “human dignity” and the second is “equality”. Human rights are actually a (experimental) definition of the basic standards necessary for a dignified life. This paper was written to present information on human rights (HAM). The results of this discussion are Human Rights and Health Rights to Food.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Elinda dwi sari

Human rights are fundamental rights and freedoms for all people, regardless of nationality, gender, gender, national or ethnic origin, race, religion, language or other status. Two values form the basis of the concept of human rights. The first is “human dignity” and the second is “equality”. Human rights are actually a (experimental) definition of the basic standards necessary for a dignified life. This paper was written to present information on human rights (HAM). The results of this discussion are Human Rights and Health Rights to Food.


Medicne pravo ◽  
2021 ◽  
pp. 80-85
Author(s):  
K. Y. Tereshko

The concept of defamation and the composition of defamation tort are analyzed. Foreign experience and judicial practice of defamation application are given. The need to uphold the principle of ensuring a balance between the constitutional right to freedom of thought and speech, the right to free expression of one’s views and beliefs, on the one hand, and the right to respect for human dignity, constitutional guarantees of non-interference in private and family life, judicial protection of the right to rebuttal inaccurate personal information, on the other. The defamation balance between medical collegiality and critical assessment of doctors' activity is formulated. A «defamatory balance» has been formed between the collegiality of doctors and the critical evaluation of doctors' activities, which will be achieved by the preemptive right to freedom of expression to protect the lives and health of patients, actions in the public interest in the case law of the European Court of Human Rights.


2021 ◽  
Vol 18 (3) ◽  
pp. 507-519
Author(s):  
Peter Kondrla

The article analyses 20 years of experience with multicultural education in Slovakia. The starting point is to examine the causes and reasons why multicultural education has been included in the education system. The rationale for the introduction of multicultural education is interpreted in the context of the current possibilities and needs of society, identifying mainly the problems that multicultural education solves today. The basic principles and pillars of multicultural education are introduced and at the same time their strengths and weaknesses are examined. Emphasis is placed on human dignity and social responsibility as sources on which other values of multicultural education are based. In contrast to these principles is the environment in which education takes place. The school and family environment do not offer a sufficient principled background, do not prefer and often do not respect the values of multiculturalism. The resulting conflict of principles and environment poses the biggest problem and risk in multicultural education. Specific attention is paid to the issue of education in the mother tongue, this problem in Slovakia mainly affects the Roma minority. The inability to learn in ones mother tongue is contrary to equal opportunities as well as to the possibilities for the development of the human person in the context of his or her dignity. Finding perspectives requires a change from above, in the setting of the school environment as well as a change from below, i.e. a change in the value orientations and personal attitudes of individual teachers and changes in their preparation for the future profession.


Sign in / Sign up

Export Citation Format

Share Document