Youth With Adhd
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2021 ◽  
Vol 12 ◽  
Author(s):  
Hannah Bigelow ◽  
Marcus D. Gottlieb ◽  
Michelle Ogrodnik ◽  
Jeffrey D. Graham ◽  
Barbara Fenesi

This study investigated how acute exercise and mindfulness meditation impacts executive functioning and psycho-emotional well-being in 16 children and youth with ADHD aged 10–14 (male = 11; White = 80%). Participants completed three interventions: 10 min of exercise, 10 min of mindfulness meditation, and 10 min of reading (control). Before and after each intervention, executive functioning (inhibitory control, working memory, task-switching) and psycho-emotional well-being (mood, self-efficacy) were assessed. Mindfulness meditation increased performance on all executive functioning tasks whereas the other interventions did not (d = 0.55–0.86). Exercise enhanced positive mood and self-efficacy whereas the other interventions did not (d = 0.22–0.35). This work provides preliminary evidence for how acute exercise and mindfulness meditation can support differential aspects of executive and psycho-emotional functioning among children and youth with ADHD.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Deanna F. Klymkiw

Differences in attentional and impulse control may underlie the increased impairment associated with youth with ADHD and comorbid anxiety (ADHD+ANX) compared to youth with ADHD without anxiety; however, findings from studies using behavioural and self-report measures have been mixed. This study addressed this issue by exploring the impact of the addition of anxiety on attentional and impulse control at a neural level, using event-related potentials (ERPs). Youth aged 11 to 17 with ADHD without anxiety (n = 34) and ADHD+ANX (n = 33) completed a Go/No-Go and Selective Auditory Attention task. Results indicated that the addition of anxiety in youth with ADHD was associated with enhanced early attentional processing, as well as stronger activation of impulse control, as exhibited by greater EFP and N2 amplitudes, respectively. Future directions and clinical implications of these results are discussed.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Deanna F. Klymkiw

Differences in attentional and impulse control may underlie the increased impairment associated with youth with ADHD and comorbid anxiety (ADHD+ANX) compared to youth with ADHD without anxiety; however, findings from studies using behavioural and self-report measures have been mixed. This study addressed this issue by exploring the impact of the addition of anxiety on attentional and impulse control at a neural level, using event-related potentials (ERPs). Youth aged 11 to 17 with ADHD without anxiety (n = 34) and ADHD+ANX (n = 33) completed a Go/No-Go and Selective Auditory Attention task. Results indicated that the addition of anxiety in youth with ADHD was associated with enhanced early attentional processing, as well as stronger activation of impulse control, as exhibited by greater EFP and N2 amplitudes, respectively. Future directions and clinical implications of these results are discussed.


Author(s):  
Laura Harris-Lane ◽  
Jacqueline Hesson ◽  
Ken Fowler ◽  
Nicholas Harris

Positive mental health in youth has important implications for overall well-being. This study examined the extent to which different types of social support are associated with positive mental health among individuals, ages 15–24, diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Compared to respondents without a diagnosis of ADHD, those with a diagnosis had significantly lower scores on measures of positive mental health and on four of five types of social support. Among the five types of social support, social integration and reassurance of worth were found to be significant predictors of positive mental health in respondents diagnosed with ADHD.


Author(s):  
Tair Shabat ◽  
Haya Fogel-Grinvald ◽  
Dana Anaby ◽  
Anat Golos

Background: Children and youth with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may experience difficulties in participation, but few studies examine their participation and the environmental factors affecting participation. This study explored the participation and the environmental factors of children and youth, with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), in the following three settings: home, school, and community. Materials and Methods: Parents of 65 participants aged 6–14 (M = 9.91, SD = 1.87) with and without ADHD completed the Participation and Environment Measure for Children and Youth (PEM-CY) questionnaire, which evaluates participation and environmental factors, along with demographic and screening questionnaires. Results: The ADHD group (n = 31) scored significantly lower than the non-ADHD group (n = 34) in “frequency” at home, “involvement”, and overall environmental support in all settings, with parents expressing a greater desire to change their child’s home and community participation. For the ADHD group, a relationship was found between environmental support and involvement in all three settings. Conclusions: The findings demonstrated differences in the participation of children and youth with ADHD across different settings, compared to those without ADHD, and confirmed the effect of environmental factors on participation, especially involvement. It is essential to consider participation measures and environmental factors when designing interventions for children and youth with ADHD.


2020 ◽  
Vol 11 ◽  
Author(s):  
Lescia K. Tremblay ◽  
Christopher Hammill ◽  
Stephanie H. Ameis ◽  
Mehereen Bhaijiwala ◽  
Donald J. Mabbott ◽  
...  

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