Tourist Industry
Recently Published Documents


TOTAL DOCUMENTS

558
(FIVE YEARS 282)

H-INDEX

18
(FIVE YEARS 5)

2022 ◽  
Vol 355 ◽  
pp. 02070
Author(s):  
Daqing Zhang

Under the background of rapid urbanization and industrialization development, in order to satisfy the increasing demand of residents for domestic water, the establishment of water source protection zone is the most effective way to protect water resources at present. However, the influence on the social and economic development could not be ignored. The article analyzes the influence of the delimitation of water source protection zone on economy such as ecological migration, urban municipal pipe network construction, rural drinking water and urban water supply. The impact on economy like industrial enterprises, agricultural planting, livestock industry, aquaculture, tourist industry were also mentioned. The article triggers the exploration of the way to realize the coordination and sustainable development of economy, society, resources and environment


Author(s):  
S. A. Lochan ◽  
D. I. Korovin ◽  
D. V. Fedyunin

Big participants of IT market, whose profits can depend seriously on dynamics of tourist flows use today’s analytical systems in order to get information concerning tourist service providing. Such information can be used for efficient distribution of resources. In March 2021 spokespeople of such companies as ‘RZhD’, ‘Yandex’, ‘Megafon’, ‘MTS’, ‘Roscosmos’ and others delivered reports on possibility to use indirect data to analyze tourist flows at the round table discussion ‘Managing Tourist Industry on the Basis of Data’, that was arranged by the Analytical Center under the Government of the Russian Federation. Opportunities to use big data and advanced methods of data analysis were demonstrated. However, such systems are not meant to solve problems of social character. Moreover, a player cannot affect the steps and preferences of the considerable circle of people, which means that there is no need to test the community response on possible planned events that can increase usefulness of the entity. In view of state entities the latter is rather important, especially in case usefulness is considered in the social-economic aspect. As a conclusion the authors underline significance of tourist market modeling in Russia by using digital technologies.


2021 ◽  
Vol 34 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Cristina Pereira Araujo ◽  
Luciano Muniz Abreu

The present article examines the relationship between tourism, production of space and the role of residents at two hotspot tourist destinations in Brazil: Cabo Frio, located in State of Rio de Janeiro and Porto Seguro, in State of Bahia. The development of the tourist industry in the localities under study occurred at different points in time. In the first, the urbanization process was associated with the acquisition of second homes in the 1950s, while the second, located in the Northeast region of the country, this process emerged in conjunction with the mass tourism industry only in the late 1980s. We hope this research will enhance understanding of the process of urbanization and the configuration of tourism space and the conflicts arising from this in developing countries, notably Latin America. Our methodology employed theories based on those developed by Chesnais (1996, 2005, 2016), Harvey (2005, 2008, 2011, 2014), Santos (2006) and others to explain the production of space in a way that goes beyond the use of historical data and socioeconomic analysis. The initial conclusion was that, despite the differences in the process (mass tourism vs. second homes, development in space and over time and geographical position), the two geographical locations selected presented the same findings: unequal production of space and the exclusion of local populations. The tourism activity investigated in these two case studies thus appears to replicate the current stage of development in Brazil, characterized by inequality and exclusion and reflected in the landscapes of the country’s tourist destinations.


2021 ◽  
Vol 10 (10(5)) ◽  
pp. 1549-1561
Author(s):  
Gustav Visser ◽  
Jamie Cloete

Tourism is a dynamic system essentially connected to all aspects of human and natural environments. Among these tourism systems and products, providers of tourist accommodation stand out. Within this context, water provision is crucial for tourist accommodation. Unfortunately, climate variability, and therefore, water availability, can and does impact tourism systems and tourism products, perhaps disproportionately so. In South Africa generally, and in an established tourism destination region such as the Cape Winelands in particular, guest houses are key role-players in the tourist industry. Nonetheless, from 2015 to 2018, this destination region experienced a crippling long-lasting drought, leading to fears of an imminent “Day Zero” – a point at which taps run dry. This would have been calamitous for tourism. To avert this, various water management strategies were implemented by Stellenbosch guest houses – the focal point of the Cape Winelands tourism region – to cope with and adapt to the drought. This study sought to examine the water management strategies manifested in the study region. It is concluded that various strategies were followed, and some appear to be permanent, rather than once-off responses. While these strategies might lead to more responsible water management strategies in tourist accommodation going forward, it appears that adopting sustainable water use practices was only done under duress and serious resistance from some guests resulted. It may be that water supply augmentation is the only way to preserve the tourism industry.


Author(s):  
Chitrranjan Singh

The COVID-19 pandemic is the world's most serious human calamity in 2020, and it has wreaked havoc on India's economy. The COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on India's economy in a variety of ways. The impact of COVID-19 on one of the most vital sectors, tourism, has been exceedingly distressing and has resulted in significant losses. As a developing economy, India was already in a precarious position before COVID-19. India's sudden nationwide lockdown was the world's largest. The four stages of continuous countrywide lockdown, which lasted more than two months, had a tremendous impact on India's tourism economy. The Indian travel and tourism sector contributed 6.8% of India's GDP in 2019 and generated 39,821 million jobs, or about 8.0 percent of total employment. The Indian tourism and hospitality industry is now forecasting a job loss of 38 million people. The Indian government has taken significant steps to resurrect the tourism industry. The Indian travel and tourist industry has begun to set general safety and hygienic standards for hosting and serving clients, as well as attempting to restore people's faith in travelling again following the corona outbreak.


2021 ◽  
Vol 13 (23) ◽  
pp. 13003
Author(s):  
Mercedes Raquel García Revilla ◽  
Olga Martínez Moure

Wine tourism, as a model of sustainable economic development in certain areas, is able to boost the competitiveness of a territory, improve wine production, respect the environment, and improve the living conditions of citizens. In this sense, this work will present an overview of this type of tourism worldwide and nationally, focusing on the province of Malaga. The diversification of the tourist industry has promoted the appearance, or extension, of new tourist activities beyond the typical activities associated with beach or cultural tourism. This has resulted in new job creation and new income generation options. Wine tourism promises and delivers a complete sensory experience, as tourists experience the consumption of wine from all senses: taste, smell, touch, sight, and sound. This experience is not limited to the consumption of the wine, but also includes the experience of a visit to wineries or vineyards, together with the necessary lodging, depending on location. In this way, the grouping of activities and the development of tourist routes stimulate cooperation between different companies in rural areas. Thus, we propose that tourism is a means by which economic and social development can be achieved in these areas and regeneration strategies can be implemented.


2021 ◽  
Vol 5 (S4) ◽  
pp. 1585-1599
Author(s):  
Vladyslava Liubarets ◽  
Iryna Zinkova ◽  
Yuliia Zemlina ◽  
Ganna Voroshylova ◽  
Anna M. Tymeychuk

The article identifies the challenges of the creative industries in tourism as an important phenomenon in the conditions of the urgent world issue COVID-19. The COVID-19 pandemic has been identified as a real challenge for travel companies around the world causing significant changes in the strategies for creating creative programs for the tourism industry. The analysis has been made, the issues and possibilities of introducing creative industries in tourism in the conditions of the ecological danger of COVID-19 have been determined. It is emphasized that creative tourism, as a self-sufficient product, easily changes the format and subject matter depending on the set objectives, while remaining creative in its nature and purpose. The main stakeholders of creative tourism have been identified: consumers of tourist services, tourist industry representatives (tour operators and agents, hoteliers, restaurateurs, guides, tour guides), the tourist community, local people, and commodity producers, authorities, cultural, scientific, and educational institutions. Measures to support the sphere of culture, cultural heritage protection, development of creative industries and tourism in Ukraine have been analyzed: preservation, promotion, and effective use of national cultural heritage, creation of conditions for tourist attractiveness of cultural heritage sites, support of creative industries.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Moira Fortin Cornejo

<p>This thesis focuses on notions of ‘traditional’ and ‘contemporary’ theatre in two Pacific Island contexts, Aotearoa and Rapa Nui. It explores how notions of ‘tradition’ are imagined, recreated, and performed through the ‘contemporary’ creative arts, with a particular focus on theatre. It offers insight about culturally-situated understandings of ‘tradition’, and seeks to acknowledge diverse meanings and perceptions of theatre that exist across diverse Pacific Island cultures, languages, and epistemologies.   Ideas about what constitutes ‘tradition’ have been significantly impacted by colonial histories, and that these culturally and historically situated ideas have wide-ranging implications for creative possibilities in the ‘contemporary’ performing arts. ‘Traditional’ performances are often seen as acceptable and relevant to Indigenous communities in Aotearoa and Rapa Nui, contributing to processes of cultural reclaiming and revitalisation. Although cultural continuity is a significant theme in Indigenous theatre in Aotearoa and Rapa Nui, the different emphasis placed upon notions of ‘tradition’ across these comparative contexts has led to very different artistic possibilities being available. In Rapa Nui there is a general reluctance in the performing arts to deviate from ‘tradition’ or to declare work as ‘contemporary.’ The reproduction of ‘traditional’ styles and stories is one response to ongoing colonialism in Rapa Nui, and to the ever present demands of the tourist industry.  Māori and Samoan theatre practitioners in Aotearoa have developed theatre forms and processes that are based in cultural values and epistemologies while also being integrated with European theatre techniques, creating innovative approaches to ‘contemporary’ themes and understandings. These developments in the creative arts are supported by the availability of a wide range of theatre education opportunities. Culturally reflective and situated approaches to theatre education have enabled Indigenous theatre practitioners in Aotearoa to use theatre as a forum to express ideas and issues to the community weaving in a variety of different cultural influences, and techniques.  This thesis utilised a case-study methodology and open-ended interviews, framed under the research methodology of talanoa, to interact with Māori, Samoan diasporic and Rapanui theatre practitioners, in order to explore their perceptions towards ‘traditional’ and ‘contemporary’ practices. This research focuses on the positives of cultural dialogue, and it emerges from a desire to support intercultural theatre practices in Aotearoa and Rapa Nui.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Moira Fortin Cornejo

<p>This thesis focuses on notions of ‘traditional’ and ‘contemporary’ theatre in two Pacific Island contexts, Aotearoa and Rapa Nui. It explores how notions of ‘tradition’ are imagined, recreated, and performed through the ‘contemporary’ creative arts, with a particular focus on theatre. It offers insight about culturally-situated understandings of ‘tradition’, and seeks to acknowledge diverse meanings and perceptions of theatre that exist across diverse Pacific Island cultures, languages, and epistemologies.   Ideas about what constitutes ‘tradition’ have been significantly impacted by colonial histories, and that these culturally and historically situated ideas have wide-ranging implications for creative possibilities in the ‘contemporary’ performing arts. ‘Traditional’ performances are often seen as acceptable and relevant to Indigenous communities in Aotearoa and Rapa Nui, contributing to processes of cultural reclaiming and revitalisation. Although cultural continuity is a significant theme in Indigenous theatre in Aotearoa and Rapa Nui, the different emphasis placed upon notions of ‘tradition’ across these comparative contexts has led to very different artistic possibilities being available. In Rapa Nui there is a general reluctance in the performing arts to deviate from ‘tradition’ or to declare work as ‘contemporary.’ The reproduction of ‘traditional’ styles and stories is one response to ongoing colonialism in Rapa Nui, and to the ever present demands of the tourist industry.  Māori and Samoan theatre practitioners in Aotearoa have developed theatre forms and processes that are based in cultural values and epistemologies while also being integrated with European theatre techniques, creating innovative approaches to ‘contemporary’ themes and understandings. These developments in the creative arts are supported by the availability of a wide range of theatre education opportunities. Culturally reflective and situated approaches to theatre education have enabled Indigenous theatre practitioners in Aotearoa to use theatre as a forum to express ideas and issues to the community weaving in a variety of different cultural influences, and techniques.  This thesis utilised a case-study methodology and open-ended interviews, framed under the research methodology of talanoa, to interact with Māori, Samoan diasporic and Rapanui theatre practitioners, in order to explore their perceptions towards ‘traditional’ and ‘contemporary’ practices. This research focuses on the positives of cultural dialogue, and it emerges from a desire to support intercultural theatre practices in Aotearoa and Rapa Nui.</p>


Sign in / Sign up

Export Citation Format

Share Document